accessory shoe definition, accessory shoe meaning | English dictionary

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accessory shoe

  

      n     (Photog)   a bracket on top of a camera to which a flash unit or other accessory may be fitted  
English Collins Dictionary - English Definition & Thesaurus  
Collins
accessory  
      n   pl   , -ries  
1    a supplementary part or object, as of a car, appliance, etc.  
2    often pl   a small accompanying item of dress, esp. of women's dress  
3    a person who incites someone to commit a crime or assists the perpetrator of a crime, either before or during its commission  
      adj  
4    supplementary; additional; subordinate  
5    assisting in or having knowledge of an act, esp. a crime  
     (C17: from Late Latin accessorius: see access)  
  accessorial      adj  
  accessorily      adv  
  accessoriness      n  


accessory fruit  
      n      another name for       pseudocarp  
accessory nerve  
      n   either one of the eleventh pair of cranial nerves, which supply the muscles of the head, shoulders, larynx, and pharynx and the viscera of the abdomen and thorax  
accessory shoe  
      n     (Photog)   a bracket on top of a camera to which a flash unit or other accessory may be fitted  

English Collins Dictionary - English Definition & Thesaurus  

Collins

accessory

  

      n  
1    abettor, accomplice, assistant, associate     (in crime)   colleague, confederate, helper, partner  
2    accent, accompaniment, addition, add-on, adjunct, adornment, aid, appendage, attachment, component, convenience, decoration, extension, extra, frill, help, supplement, trim, trimming  
      adj  
3    abetting, additional, aiding, ancillary, assisting in, auxiliary, contributory, extra, secondary, subordinate, supplemental, supplementary  

English Collins Dictionary - English synonyms & Thesaurus  

Collaborative Dictionary     English Definition
exp.
wait for something, usually linked to a previous event, to happen; expect something that can not be avoided to happen
n.
in American English, 'dirt' is what British people call 'soil' ('put some dirt in a plant pot'). In British English, dirt has the connotation of being dirty ('you've got some dirt on your shoe')
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