lose contact (with sb) meaning, lose contact (with sb) definition | English Cobuild dictionary

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Collins

contact

  
  ( contacts    plural & 3rd person present)   ( contacting    present participle)   ( contacted    past tense & past participle  )
1       n-uncount   Contact involves meeting or communicating with someone, especially regularly.  
also N in pl, oft N with/between n  
Opposition leaders are denying any contact with the government in Kabul..., He forbade contacts between directors and executives outside his presence.     
2    If you are in contactwith someone, you regularly meet them or communicate with them.  
in contact (with sb)      phrase   usu v-link PHR, oft PHR with n  
He was in direct contact with the kidnappers..., We do keep in contact.     
3       verb   If you contact someone, you telephone them, write to them, or go to see them in order to tell or ask them something.  
Contact the Tourist Information Bureau for further details...      V n  
When she first contacted me Frances was upset.      V n  
4       n-uncount   If you come into contact with someone or something, you meet that person or thing in the course of your work or other activities.  
into N with n  
The college has brought me into contact with western ideas.     
5    If you make contactwith someone, you find out where they are and talk or write to them.  
make contact (with sb)      phrase   V inflects, PHR with n, pl-n V  
Then, after she had become famous, he tried to make contact with her.     
6    If you lose contactwith someone who you have been friendly with, you no longer see them, speak to them, or write to them.  
lose contact (with sb)             phrase   V inflects, PHR with n, pl-n V  
Though they all live nearby, I lost contact with them really quickly..., Mother and son lost contact when Nicholas was in his early twenties.     
7       n-uncount   When people or things are in contact, they are touching each other.  
oft in/into N with n  
They compared how these organisms behaved when left in contact with different materials..., The cry occurs when air is brought into contact with the baby's larynx..., There was no physical contact, nor did I want any...     
8       n-uncount   Radio contact is communication by means of radio.  
...a technical problem reported by the pilot moments before he lost contact with the control tower.     
9       n-count   A contact is someone you know in an organization or profession who helps you or gives you information.  
Their contact in the United States Embassy was called Phil.     
10   
    to make eye contact  
    eye  
Translation English Cobuild Collins Dictionary  
Collins
lose     ( loses    3rd person present)   ( losing    present participle)   ( lost    past tense & past participle  )
1       verb   If you lose a contest, a fight, or an argument, you do not succeed because someone does better than you and defeats you.  
A C Milan lost the Italian Cup Final...      V n  
The government lost the argument over the pace of reform...      V n  
No one likes to be on the losing side.      V-ing  
2       verb   If you lose something, you do not know where it is, for example because you have forgotten where you put it.  
I lost my keys...      V n  
I had to go back for my checkup; they'd lost my X-rays.      V n  
3       verb   You say that you lose something when you no longer have it because it has been taken away from you or destroyed.  
I lost my job when the company moved to another state...      V n  
She was terrified they'd lose their home.      V n  
4       verb   If someone loses a quality, characteristic, attitude, or belief, they no longer have it.  
He lost all sense of reason...      V n  
He had lost his desire to live.      V n  
5       verb   If you lose an ability, you stop having that ability because of something such as an accident.  
They lost their ability to hear...      V n  
He had lost the use of his legs.      V n  
6       verb   If someone or something loses heat, their temperature becomes lower.  
Babies lose heat much faster than adults...      V n  
7       verb   If you lose blood or fluid from your body, it leaves your body so that you have less of it.  
During fever a large quantity of fluid is lost in perspiration.      V n  
8       verb   If you lose weight, you become less heavy, and usually look thinner.  
I have lost a lot of weight...      V n  
Martha was able to lose 25 pounds.      V n  
9       verb   If you lose a part of your body, it is cut off in an operation or in an accident.  
He lost a foot when he was struck by a train.      V n  
10       verb   If someone loses their life, they die.  
...the ferry disaster in 1987, in which 192 people lost their lives...      V n  
Hundreds of lives were lost in fighting.      V n  
11       verb   If you lose a close relative or friend, they die.  
My Grandma lost her brother in the war.      V n  
12       verb   If things are lost, they are destroyed in a disaster.  
usu passive  
...the famous Nankin pottery that was lost in a shipwreck off the coast of China.      be V-ed  
13       verb   If you lose time, something slows you down so that you do not make as much progress as you hoped.  
They claim that police lost valuable time in the early part of the investigation...      V n  
Six hours were lost in all.      V n  
14       verb   If you lose an opportunity, you do not take advantage of it.  
If you don't do it soon you're going to lose the opportunity...      V n  
They did not lose the opportunity to say what they thought of events.      V n to-inf  
...a lost opportunity.      V-ed  
15       verb   If you loseyourself in something or if you are lostin it, you give a lot of attention to it and do not think about anything else.   (=absorb)  
Michael held on to her arm, losing himself in the music...      V pron-refl in n  
He was lost in the contemplation of the landscape.      be V-ed in n  
16       verb   If a business loses money, it earns less money than it spends, and is therefore in debt.     (BUSINESS)  
His shops stand to lose millions of pounds...      V n  
17       verb   If something loses you a contest or loses you something that you had, it causes you to fail or to no longer have what you had.  
My own stupidity lost me the match...      V n n  
His economic mismanagement has lost him the support of the general public.      V n n  
18   
    lost  
19    If someone loses it, they become extremely angry or upset.  
INFORMAL  
lose it      phrase   V inflects  
I completely lost it. I went mad, berserk.     
20    If you lose your way, you become lost when you are trying to go somewhere.  
lose one's way      phrase   V inflects  
The men lost their way in a sandstorm.     
21   
    to lose your balance  
    balance  
    to lose the battle but win the war  
    battle  
    to lose contact  
    contact  
    to lose your cool  
    cool  
    to lose face  
    face  
    to lose your grip  
    grip  
    to lose your head  
    head  
    to lose heart  
    heart  
    to lose your mind  
    mind  
    to lose your nerve  
    nerve  
    to lose the plot  
    plot  
    to lose sight of  
    sight  
    to lose your temper  
    temper  
    to lose touch  
    touch  
    to lose track of  
    track   lose out      phrasal verb   If you lose out, you suffer a loss or disadvantage because you have not succeeded in what you were doing.   (=miss out)  
We both lost out...      V P  
Laura lost out to Tom...      V P to n  
Women have lost out in this new pay flexibility...      V P in n  
Egypt has lost out on revenues from the Suez Canal.      V P on n  

Translation English Cobuild Collins Dictionary  

Collins

lose

  
1    be deprived of, displace, drop, fail to keep, forget, mislay, misplace, miss, suffer loss  
2    capitulate, default, fail, fall short, forfeit, lose out on     (informal)   miss, pass up     (informal)   yield  
3    be defeated, be the loser, be worsted, come a cropper     (informal)   come to grief, get the worst of, lose out, suffer defeat, take a licking     (informal)  
4    consume, deplete, dissipate, drain, exhaust, expend, lavish, misspend, squander, use up, waste  
5    confuse, miss, stray from, wander from  
6    lap, leave behind, outdistance, outrun, outstrip, overtake, pass  
7    dodge, duck, elude, escape, evade, give someone the slip, shake off, slip away, throw off  

English Collins Dictionary - English synonyms & Thesaurus  

Collaborative Dictionary     English Cobuild
exp.
lose contact
v.
to have sexual intercourse with sb
v.
make an obscene and offensive gesture at someone by closing one's fist and extending one's middle finger upwards, interpreted as"Sod off!"; [US] flip (sb) off / flip (sb) the bird
Ex.: he has an unfortunate tendency and somewhat dangerous habit of giving the finger to motorists who cut in front of him.
exp.
get well with someone from the very beginning of the relationship
used when referring to romantic relationship, but also in a larger meaning: He hit it off with his teacher; he will continue taking classes with her.
v.
1. throw someone or something out of a window 2. [fig.][fam.] dismiss/remove (sb) from a position of authority/power
Ex1: The inspector considers the assumption that the victim might have been defenastrated. Ex2: Due to the lack of results, the decision was taken to 'defenestrate' the manager.
exp.
go crazy; get angry; lose self-control
E.g.: I will lose it if we keep listening to this song.
v.
update sb.
Did you hear what happened? - No, fill me in, please.
exp.
worry about something; be concerned about smth. (to the point of not being able to fall asleep)
exp.
to lose one's temper
very familiar
v.
to subject (an industry) to a business model in which services are offered on demand through direct contact between a customer and a supplier, usually via mobile technology
[Bus.] From the taxi company 'Uber', which pioneered this business model
exp.
to take OR bring somebody down a notch means to make them behave less arrogantly or proudly.
n.
In computer science, the File Allocation Table (FAT) is a file system popularized by Microsoft in the 1980's in their earliest computers. The FAT file system has continued to be developed and now comes in multiple varieties such as FAT12, FAT16, FAT32 and ExFAT.
[Tech.];[Comp.] Look at that floppy disk, see if it is formatted with the FAT file system.
n.
perpetrator(perpetrador)
n.
scallion (synonym)
exp.
(metaphorically) die
[Fig.]
n.
small handbag without handles
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