hold meaning, hold definition | English Cobuild dictionary

Search also in: Web News Encyclopedia Images
Collins
hold         

[

1]  
  ( holds    plural & 3rd person present)   ( holding    present participle)   ( held    past tense & past participle  )   (PHYSICALLY TOUCHING, SUPPORTING, OR CONTAINING)  
1       verb   When you hold    something, you carry or support it, using your hands or your arms.      
Hold the knife at an angle...      V n prep/adv  
He held the pistol in his right hand...      V n  
      Hold is also a noun., n-count   usu sing  
He released his hold on the camera.     
2       n-uncount   Hold is used in expressions such as grab hold of, catch hold of, and get hold of, to indicate that you close your hand tightly around something, for example to stop something moving or falling.  
N of n  
I was woken up by someone grabbing hold of my sleeping bag..., A doctor and a nurse caught hold of his arms...     
3       verb   When you hold    someone, you put your arms round them, usually because you want to show them how much you like them or because you want to comfort them.      
If only he would hold her close to him.      V n adv, Also V n  
4       verb   If you hold    someone in a particular position, you use force to keep them in that position and stop them from moving.      
He then held the man in an armlock until police arrived...      V n prep  
I'd got two nurses holding me down.      V n with adv, Also V n  
5       n-count   A hold    is a particular way of keeping someone in a position using your own hands, arms, or legs.      
...use of an unauthorized hold on a handcuffed suspect.     
6       verb   When you hold    a part of your body, you put your hand on or against it, often because it hurts.      
Soon she was crying bitterly about the pain and was holding her throat.      V n  
7       verb   When you hold    a part of your body in a particular position, you put it into that position and keep it there.      
Hold your hands in front of your face...      V n prep/adv  
He walked at a rapid pace with his back straight and his head held erect.      V-ed, Also V n adj  
8       verb   If one thing holds another in a particular position, it keeps it in that position.  
...the wooden wedge which held the heavy door open...      V n with adv  
They used steel pins to hold everything in place.      V n prep  
9       verb   If one thing is used to hold    another, it is used to store it.       (=store)  
Two knife racks hold her favourite knives.      V n  
10       n-count   In a ship or aeroplane, a hold    is a place where cargo or luggage is stored.      
oft n N  
A fire had been reported in the cargo hold.     
11       verb   If a place holds something, it keeps it available for reference or for future use.  
The Small Firms Service holds an enormous amount of information on any business problem...      V n  
12       verb   If something holds a particular amount of something, it can contain that amount.  
no cont  
One CD-ROM disk can hold over 100,000 pages of text.      V n  
13       verb   If a vehicle holds the road well, it remains in close contact with the road and can be controlled safely and easily.  
I thought the car held the road really well.      V n adv, Also V n  
14   
    holding  
Translation English Cobuild Collins Dictionary  
Collins
hold          [2]     ( holds    3rd person present)   ( holding    present participle)   ( held    past tense & past participle  )   (HAVING OR DOING)  
Hold is often used to indicate that someone or something has the particular thing, characteristic, or attitude that is mentioned. Therefore it takes most of its meaning from the word that follows it.     
1       verb   Hold is used with words and expressions indicating an opinion or belief, to show that someone has a particular opinion or believes that something is true.  
no cont  
He holds certain expectations about the teacher's role...      V n  
Current thinking holds that obesity is more a medical than a psychological problem...      V that  
The public, meanwhile, hold architects in low esteem.      V n in n  
...a widely held opinion.      V-ed  
2       verb   Hold is used with words such as `fear' or `mystery' to indicate someone's feelings towards something, as if those feelings were a characteristic of the thing itself.  
no passive  
Death doesn't hold any fear for me...      V n for n  
It held more mystery than even the darkest jungle...      V n  
3       verb   Hold is used with nouns such as `office', `power', and `responsibility' to indicate that someone has a particular position of power or authority.  
She has never held ministerial office...      V n  
4       verb   Hold is used with nouns such as `permit', `degree', or `ticket' to indicate that someone has a particular document that allows them to do something.  
He did not hold a firearm certificate...      V n  
Passengers holding tickets will receive refunds.      V n  
5       verb   Hold is used with nouns such as `party', `meeting', `talks', `election', and `trial' to indicate that people are organizing a particular activity.  
The German sports federation said it would hold an investigation.      V n  
  holding      n-uncount   N of n  
They also called for the holding of multi-party general elections.     
6       v-recip   Hold is used with nouns such as `conversation', `interview', and `talks' to indicate that two or more people meet and discuss something.  
The Prime Minister, is holding consultations with his colleagues to finalise the deal...      V n with n  
The engineer and his son held frequent consultations concerning technical problems...      pl-n V  
They can't believe you can even hold a conversation.      V n (non-recip)  
7       verb   Hold is used with nouns such as `shares' and `stock' to indicate that someone owns a particular proportion of a business.  
The group said it continues to hold 1,774,687 Vons shares...      V n  
    holding  
8       verb   Hold is used with words such as `lead' or `advantage' to indicate that someone is winning or doing well in a contest.  
He continued to hold a lead in Angola's presidential race...      V n  
9       verb   Hold is used with nouns such as `attention' or `interest' to indicate that what you do or say keeps someone interested or listening to you.   (=keep)  
If you want to hold someone's attention, look them directly in the eye but don't stare...      V n  
10       verb   If you hold    someone responsible, liable, or accountable for something, you will blame them if anything goes wrong.      
It's impossible to hold any individual responsible.      V n adj  

Translation English Cobuild Collins Dictionary  

Collins
hold          [3]     ( holds    3rd person present)   ( holding    present participle)   ( held    past tense & past participle  )   (CONTROLLING OR REMAINING)  
1       verb   If someone holds you in a place, they keep you there as a prisoner and do not allow you to leave.  
The inside of a van was as good a place as any to hold a kidnap victim...      V n  
Somebody is holding your wife hostage...      V n n  
Japan had originally demanded the return of two seamen held on spying charges.      V-ed  
2       verb   If people such as an army or a violent crowd hold    a place, they control it by using force.      
Demonstrators have been holding the square since Sunday.      V n  
3       n-sing   If you have a hold   over someone, you have power or control over them, for example because you know something about them you can use to threaten them or because you are in a position of authority.      
usu N over/on n  
He had ordered his officers to keep an exceptionally firm hold over their men...     
4       verb   If you ask someone to hold   , or to hold   the line, when you are answering a telephone call, you are asking them to wait for a short time, for example so that you can find the person they want to speak to.         
no passive   (=hold on)  
Could you hold the line and I'll just get my pen...      V n  
A telephone operator asked him to hold.      V  
5       verb   If you hold    telephone calls for someone, you do not allow people who phone to speak to that person, but take messages instead.      
He tells his secretary to hold his calls.      V n  
6       verb   If something holds at a particular value or level, or is held there, it is kept at that value or level.  
OPEC production is holding at around 21.5 million barrels a day...      V prep/adv/adj  
The Prime Minister yesterday ruled out Government action to hold down petrol prices...      V n with adv  
The final dividend will be held at 20.7p, after an 8 per cent increase.      V n prep/adj  
...provided the pound holds its value against the euro.      V n  
7       verb   If you hold    a sound or musical note, you continue making it.      
...a voice which hit and held every note with perfect ease and clarity.      V n  
8       verb   If you hold    something such as a train, a lift, or an elevator, you delay it.      
A London Underground spokesman defended the decision to hold the train until police arrived.      V n  
9       verb   If an offer or invitation still holds, it is still available for you to accept.  
Does your offer still hold?      V  
10       verb   If a good situation holds, it continues and does not get worse or fail.  
Our luck couldn't hold for ever...      V  
Would the weather hold?...      V  
11       verb   If an argument or theory holds, it is true or valid, even after close examination.  
Today, most people think that argument no longer holds...      V  
      Hold up means the same as hold   ., phrasal verb      
Democrats say arguments against the bill won't hold up.      V P  
12       verb   If part of a structure holds, it does not fall or break although there is a lot of force or pressure on it.  
How long would the roof hold?      V  
13       verb   If laws or rules hold   , they exist and remain in force.      
These laws also hold for universities.      V  
14       verb   If you hold to a promise or to high standards of behaviour, you keep that promise or continue to behave according to those standards.  
FORMAL  
(=stick to)  

Will the President be able to hold to this commitment?...      V to n  
15       verb   If someone or something holds you to a promise or to high standards of behaviour, they make you keep that promise or those standards.  
Don't hold me to that...      V n to n  

Translation English Cobuild Collins Dictionary  

Collins
hold          [4]     ( holds    3rd person present)   ( holding    present participle)   ( held    past tense & past participle  )   (PHRASES)  
Please look at category 13 to see if the expression you are looking for is shown under another headword.     
1    If you hold forthon a subject, you speak confidently and for a long time about it, especially to a group of people.  
hold forth      phrase   V inflects, oft PHR on n  
Barry was holding forth on politics.     
2    If you get hold of an object or information, you obtain it, usually after some difficulty.  
get hold of sth      phrase   V inflects, PHR n  
It is hard to get hold of guns in this country.     
3    If you get hold of a fact or a subject, you learn about it and understand it well.  
  (BRIT)  
INFORMAL  
get hold of sth      phrase   V inflects, PHR n  
He first had to get hold of some basic facts.     
4    If you get hold of someone, you manage to contact them.  
get hold of sb      phrase   V inflects, PHR n  
The only electrician we could get hold of was miles away.     
5    If you say `Hold it', you are telling someone to stop what they are doing and to wait.  
hold it      convention   (=stop)  
Hold it! Don't move!     
6    If you put something on hold, you decide not to do it, deal with it, or change it now, but to leave it until later.  
on hold      phrase   PHR after v, v-link PHR  
He put his retirement on hold until he had found a solution...     
7    If you hold    your own, you are able to resist someone who is attacking or opposing you.      
hold one's own      phrase   V inflects  
The Frenchman held his own against the challenger.     
8    If you can do something well enough to hold    your own, you do not appear foolish when you are compared with someone who is generally thought to be very good at it.      
hold one's own      phrase   V inflects, oft PHR against n  
She can hold her own against almost any player.     
9    If you hold still, you do not move.  
hold still      phrase   V inflects  
Can't you hold still for a second?     
10    If something takes hold, it gains complete control or influence over a person or thing.  
take hold      phrase   V inflects, oft PHR of n  
She felt a strange excitement taking hold of her...     
11    If you hold tight, you put your hand round or against something in order to prevent yourself from falling over. A bus driver might say `Hold tight!' to you if you are standing on a bus when it is about to move.  
hold tight      phrase   V inflects, oft PHR prep   (=hang on)  
He held tight to the rope...     
12    If you hold tight, you do not immediately start a course of action that you have been planning or thinking about.  
hold tight      phrase   V inflects  
The unions have circulated their branches, urging members to hold tight until a national deal is struck.     
13   
    to hold something at bay  
    bay  
    to hold your breath  
    breath  
    to hold something in check  
    check  
    to hold court  
    court  
    to hold fast  
    fast  
    to hold the fort  
    fort  
    to hold your ground  
    ground  
    to hold your peace  
    peace  
    to hold someone to ransom  
    ransom  
    to hold sway  
    sway  
    to hold your tongue  
    tongue  

Translation English Cobuild Collins Dictionary  

Collins
hold          [5]     ( holds    3rd person present)   ( holding    present participle)   ( held    past tense & past participle  )   (PHRASAL VERBS)   hold against      phrasal verb   If you hold    something against someone, you let their actions in the past influence your present attitude towards them and cause you to deal severely or unfairly with them.      
Bernstein lost the case, but never held it against Grundy.      V n P n   hold back  
1       phrasal verb   If you hold back or if something holds you back, you hesitate before you do something because you are not sure whether it is the right thing to do.  
The administration had several reasons for holding back...      V P  
Melancholy and mistrust of men hold her back.      V n P  
2       phrasal verb   To hold    someone or something back means to prevent someone from doing something, or to prevent something from happening.      
Stagnation in home sales is holding back economic recovery...      V P n (not pron)  
Jake wanted to wake up, but sleep held him back.      V n P  
3       phrasal verb   If you hold    something back, you keep it in reserve to use later.      
Farmers apparently hold back produce in the hope that prices will rise.      V P n (not pron), Also V n P  
4       phrasal verb   If you hold    something back, you do not include it in the information you are giving about something.      
You seem to be holding something back.      V n P  
5       phrasal verb   If you hold back something such as tears or laughter, or if you hold back, you make an effort to stop yourself from showing how you feel.  
She kept trying to hold back her tears...      V P n (not pron)  
I was close to tears with frustration, but I held back.      V P, Also V n P   hold down  
1       phrasal verb   If you hold down a job or a place in a team, you manage to keep it.  
oft with brd-neg  
He never could hold down a job...      V P n (not pron)  
Constant injury problems had made it tough for him to hold down a regular first team place.      V P n (not pron), Also V n P  
2       phrasal verb   If you hold    someone down, you keep them under control and do not allow them to have much freedom or power or many rights.      
Everyone thinks there is some vast conspiracy wanting to hold down the younger generation.      V P n (not pron)   hold in      phrasal verb   If you hold in an emotion or feeling, you do not allow yourself to express it, often making it more difficult to deal with.  
Depression can be traced to holding in anger...      V P n (not pron)  
Go ahead and cry. Don't hold it in.      V n P   hold off  
1       phrasal verb   If you hold off doing something, you delay doing it or delay making a decision about it.  
The hospital staff held off taking Rosenbaum in for an X-ray...      V P -ing  
They have threatened military action but held off until now.      V P  
2       phrasal verb   If you hold off a challenge in a race or competition, you do not allow someone to pass you.  
Between 1987 and 1990, Steffi Graf largely held off Navratilova's challenge for the crown.      V P n (not pron)   hold on   , hold onto  
1       phrasal verb   If you hold on, or hold onto something, you keep your hand on it or around it, for example to prevent the thing from falling or to support yourself.  
His right arm was extended up beside his head, still holding on to a coffee cup...      V P to n  
He was struggling to hold onto a rock on the face of the cliff...      V P n  
Despite her aching shoulders, Nancy held on.      V P  
2       phrasal verb   If you hold on, you manage to achieve success or avoid failure in spite of great difficulties or opposition.  
This Government deserved to lose power a year ago. It held on.      V P  
3       phrasal verb   If you ask someone to hold on, you are asking them to wait for a short time.  
SPOKEN  
(=hang on)  

The manager asked him to hold on while he investigated.      V P   hold on to   , hold onto  
1       phrasal verb   If you hold on to something that gives you an advantage, you succeed in keeping it for yourself, and prevent it from being taken away or given to someone else.  
Firms are now keen to hold on to the people they recruit.      V P P n  
...a politician who knew how to hold onto power.      V P n  
2       phrasal verb   If you hold on to something, you keep it for a longer time than would normally be expected.   (=keep)  
Do you think you could hold on to that report for the next day or two?...      V P P n  
People hold onto letters for years and years.      V P n  
3       phrasal verb   If you hold on to your beliefs, ideas, or principles, you continue to believe in them and do not change or abandon them if others try to influence you or if circumstances cause you to doubt them.  
He was imprisoned for 19 years yet held on to his belief in his people.      V P P n   hold out  
1       phrasal verb   If you hold out your hand or something you have in your hand, you move your hand away from your body, for example to shake hands with someone.  
`I'm Nancy Drew,' she said, holding out her hand...      V P n (not pron)  
2       phrasal verb   If you hold outfor something, you refuse to accept something which you do not think is good enough or large enough, and you continue to demand more.  
I should have held out for a better deal...      V P for n  
He can only hold out a few more weeks.      V P  
3       phrasal verb   If you say that someone is holding outon you, you think that they are refusing to give you information that you want.  
INFORMAL   He had always believed that kids could sense it when you held out on them.      V P on n  
4       phrasal verb   If you hold out, you manage to resist an enemy or opponent in difficult circumstances and refuse to give in.  
One prisoner was still holding out on the roof of the jail.      V P  
5       phrasal verb   If you hold out hope of something happening, you hope that in the future something will happen as you want it to.  
He still holds out hope that they could be a family again.      V P n (not pron)   hold over  
1       phrasal verb   If you hold    something over someone, you use it in order to threaten them or make them do what you want.      
Did Laurie know something, and hold it over Felicity?      V n P n  
2       phrasal verb   If something isheld over, it does not happen or it is not dealt with until a future date.  
Further voting might be held over until tomorrow...      be V-ed P  
We would have held the story over until the next day.      V n P, Also V P n (not pron)   hold together      phrasal verb   If you hold    a group of people together, you help them to live or work together without arguing, although they may have different aims, attitudes, or interests.      
Her 13-year-old daughter is holding the family together...      V n P  
...the political balance which holds together the government...      V P n (not pron)  
The coalition will never hold together for six months.      V P   hold up  
1       phrasal verb   If you hold up your hand or something you have in your hand, you move it upwards into a particular position and keep it there.  
She held up her hand stiffly...      V P n (not pron)  
Hold it up so that we can see it.      V n P  
2       phrasal verb   If one thing holds up another, it is placed under the other thing in order to support it and prevent it from falling.  
Mills have iron pillars all over the place holding up the roof...      V P n (not pron)  
Her legs wouldn't hold her up.      V n P  
3       phrasal verb   To hold up a person or process means to make them late or delay them.   (=delay)  
Why were you holding everyone up?...      V n P  
Continuing violence could hold up progress towards reform.      V P n (not pron)  
4       phrasal verb   If someone holds up a place such as a bank or a shop, they point a weapon at someone there to make them give them money or valuable goods.   (=rob)  
A thief ran off with hundreds of pounds yesterday after holding up a petrol station.      V P n (not pron), Also V n P  
5       phrasal verb   If you hold up something such as someone's behaviour, you make it known to other people, so that they can criticize or praise it.  
He had always been held up as an example to the younger ones.      be V-ed P as n, Also V n P as n  
6       phrasal verb   If something such as a type of business holds up in difficult conditions, it stays in a reasonably good state.  
Children's wear is one area that is holding up well in the recession.      V P  
7       phrasal verb   If an argument or theory holds up, it is true or valid, even after close examination.   (=stand up)  
I'm not sure if the argument holds up, but it's stimulating.     
8   
    hold-up   hold with      phrasal verb   If you do not hold with an activity or action, you do not approve of it.  
with brd-neg  
I don't hold with the way they do things nowadays.      V P n  

Translation English Cobuild Collins Dictionary  

Collins

hold

  

      vb  
1    have, keep, maintain, occupy, own, possess, retain  
2    adhere, clasp, cleave, clinch, cling, clutch, cradle, embrace, enfold, grasp, grip, stick  
3    arrest, bind, check, confine, curb, detain, impound, imprison, pound, restrain, stay, stop, suspend  
4    assume, believe, consider, deem, entertain, esteem, judge, maintain, presume, reckon, regard, think, view  
5    continue, endure, last, persevere, persist, remain, resist, stay, wear  
6    assemble, call, carry on, celebrate, conduct, convene, have, officiate at, preside over, run, solemnize  
7    bear, brace, carry, prop, shoulder, support, sustain, take  
8    accommodate, comprise, contain, have a capacity for, seat, take  
9    apply, be in force, be the case, exist, hold good, operate, remain true, remain valid, stand up  
10    hold one's own      do well, hold fast, hold out, keep one's head above water, keep pace, keep up, maintain one's position, stand firm, stand one's ground, stay put, stick to one's guns     (informal)  
      n  
11    clasp, clutch, grasp, grip  
12    anchorage, foothold, footing, leverage, prop, purchase, stay, support, vantage  
13    ascendancy, authority, clout     (informal)   control, dominance, dominion, influence, mastery, pull     (informal)   sway  
  
Antonyms     
  
1    bestow, give, give up, hand over, offer, turn over  
2    come undone, let go, loosen  
3    free, let go, let loose, release  
4    deny, disavow, disclaim, put down, refute, reject  
5    give up, give way  
6    call off, cancel, postpone  
7    break, give way  


hold back  
1    check, control, curb, inhibit, rein, repress, restrain, stem the flow, suppress  
2    desist, forbear, keep back, refuse, withhold  
hold forth     
declaim, descant, discourse, go on, harangue, lecture, orate, preach, speak, speechify, spiel     (informal)   spout     (informal)  
hold off  
1    avoid, defer, delay, keep from, postpone, put off, refrain  
2    fend off, keep off, rebuff, repel, repulse, stave off  
hold out  
1    extend, give, offer, present, proffer  
2    carry on, continue, endure, hang on, last, persevere, persist, stand fast, stay the course, withstand  
hold over     
adjourn, defer, delay, postpone, put off, suspend, take a rain check on     (U.S. & Canad. informal)   waive  
hold-up  
1    bottleneck, delay, difficulty, hitch, obstruction, setback, snag, stoppage, traffic jam, trouble, wait  
2    burglary, mugging     (informal)   robbery, steaming     (informal)   stick-up     (slang, chiefly U.S.)   theft  
hold up  
1    delay, detain, hinder, impede, retard, set back, slow down, stop  
2    bolster, brace, buttress, jack up, prop, shore up, support, sustain  
3    mug     (informal)   rob, stick up     (slang, chiefly U.S.)   waylay  
4    display, exhibit, flaunt, present, show  
5    bear up, endure, last, survive, wear  
hold with     
agree to or with, approve of, be in favour of, countenance, subscribe to, support, take kindly to  
  
Antonyms     
   be against, disagree with, disapprove of, hold out against, oppose  

English Collins Dictionary - English synonyms & Thesaurus  

hold on tight! exp.
expression used for letting someone know that he/she should prepare for a difficult or unpleasant upcoming event

Additional comments:

crepidule:

unlexiking : Merci Iris, je m'étais mis dans la tête que c'était à peu...

To ensure the quality of comments, you need to be connected. It’s easy and only takes a few seconds
Or Sign up/login to Reverso account

Collaborative Dictionary     English Cobuild
exp.
it's said for determining someone to calm down, be patient, control his/her reactions
exp.
expression used when referring to something that is unlikely to happen soon (not in the time interval that one can resist holding his breath)
E.g.: "Will the economy recover any soon?" - "Don't hold your breath."
id.
expression referring to the belief that those who hold the power are entitled to anything
o.
Actual hold of digital assets with or without lawful title.
[Tech.];[Leg.] hold of digital assets
n.
Actual hold (complete or partial control) of digital assets with or without lawful title
[Tech.];[Leg.] hold of digital assets in cyberspace
o.
It is right of every netizen to hold any opinion in cyberspace without any sanction.
[Tech.] freedom of expression
exp.
User’s online presence that hold the potential to be the key to ones online identity, value and worth.
[Tech.]
n.
device that holds a book while reading it
To add entries to your own vocabulary, become a member of Reverso community or login if you are already a member. It's easy and only takes a few seconds:
Or sign up in the traditional way

Advertising
Advertising