ha meaning, ha definition | English Cobuild dictionary

Search also in: Web News Encyclopedia Images
Collins

ha

  
, hah   Ha is used in writing to represent a noise that people make to show they are surprised, annoyed, or pleased about something.      exclam  
Ha! said Wren. Think I'd trust you?...     
    ha ha  


ha.  
ha. is a written abbreviation for hectare.  
ha ha   , ha ha ha  
1       exclam   Ha ha is used in writing to represent the sound that people make when they laugh.  
I dropped my bag at the officer's feet. The bank notes fell out. `Ha ha ha!' he laughed. `Got no money, uh?'     
2       exclam   People sometimes say `ha ha' to show that they are not amused by what you have said, or do not believe it.  
SPOKEN   He said `vegetarians unite', and I looked at him and said `yeah, ha ha'.     
hoo-ha     
If there is a hoo-ha, there is a lot of fuss about something.  
INFORMAL      n-sing   also no det  
Schulman is a little tired of the hoo-ha about the all-women team.     
Translation English Cobuild Collins Dictionary  
See also:

ha., has, ha ha, ha ha ha

that ship has sailed exp.
expression used to describe a lost opportunity or something that is unlikely to happen in the current circumstances

Example

He couldn't play tennis anymore after his accident. That ship has sailed for him.

Additional comments:

To ensure the quality of comments, you need to be connected. It’s easy and only takes a few seconds
Or Sign up/login to Reverso account

Collaborative Dictionary     English Cobuild
exp.
the show is over, you can go home, the main purpose of your presence is gone
was used in Elvis concerts to prevent people from waiting an encore
exp.
it sounds interesting or attractive
exp.
expression used to describe something that is in decline or has lost the qualities that made it popular, appealing, successful
used originally in media to describe a show or a movie that is declining in popularity. E.g: I loved their ads, but with the last ones they just jump the shark.
q.
This expression means it is better to let one's emotions out, rather than bottled up inside. It is also often said when someone has gas.
this is just something my grandmother would say in cajun french
n.
an Internet business which has failed
adj.
an element that has a single dominating theme
for instance : having a theme that continues through more than one movement of a musical composition
v.
A culture of internet only jobs has coined the phrase Wirk. Wirk simply means Internet Work. Internet work is defined by job opportunities that did not exist before the rise of the internet and furthermore the work is likely to be carried out over the internet and payment received for work undertaken via the internet. Wirk describes both full time and part time internet work. Because of the nature of Wirk and the ability for anyone that has internet connection to earn money from Wirk, it is currently more likely to be a part time occupation than full time. Paid Online Questionnaires, Content Writing, Search Marketing are all examples of Wirk.
This is a term rising in popularity
n.
in American English, 'dirt' is what British people call 'soil' ('put some dirt in a plant pot'). In British English, dirt has the connotation of being dirty ('you've got some dirt on your shoe')
n.
a person who has a lack of experience, skill or knowledge in a particular sphere or activity, especially computing or the use of the Internet
[Slang];[Pej.] Also written "n00b" (with zeros). The word came from "newb" or "newbie" which refers to someone who is just starting out in the use of the Net.
adj.
Qualifies a person who has a deep understanding of a certain topic, usually feminism.
Example: Love hearing Daniel Radcliffe praise the HeForShe campaign, he is so woke!'
adv.
A formal word that is put in the beginning of sentence that has a similar meaning to furthermore, therefore, and from now on
I like ice-cream; Hence, I have lots of ice-cream cups in my fridge
n.
an affectionate slang name for a penis, similar to tadger, which is a more common used term. Used especially in the North of England, Todger has also been used as a nickname, particularly for males called Tom and Todd
n.
Bookish knowledge; knowledge obtained through hearsay, has no sound basis
n.
sigle of "Air Launched Cruise Missile" that can find his target electronically by his own means at a long distance according to a memorized map of the landscape he has to pass over
can also be launched from the soil or the sea. they can be reprogrammed or destroyed during the fly by the "sender"
n.
a body part is a part of a human body, usually one that has been cut or torn from the body in a violent incident (such as an accident, an explosion, etc)
n.
1. a package containing food, clothes or other items that the receiver has difficulties in procuring by himself; 2. a package containing small gifts for close persons
n.
money paid to someone because they have suffered injury or loss, or because what they own has been damaged
[US] She received a compensation from the government for the damage caused to her property.
n.
Abandoning something that one has intimate knowledge of for something unknown and probably highly risky to one's well-being.
n.
verification conducted by police to find out if a person has a criminal record or not.
Usually requested by an individual for new employment, citizenship applications, name changes, etc.
n.
Phrase used when someone has brought all the evidences to support his point of view; "I'm done with explanations"
n.
(in an auction, negotiation or other business competition) the situation in which the winning party has overrated the pursued object
[Bus.]
n.
is a test process that is performed after the software has been changed in order to verify if the changes didn't affect other software parts
n.
a patient who lost is tracheal reflexes by general anesthesia or Coma ; state whos trache has been protected by a tube that permits artificial ventilation.
Medical term
n.
unconventional monetary policy used by central banks to stimulate the national economy when conventional monetary policy has become ineffective.
n.
means a different approach or a welcome change to something. Ex.: anna has lots of wonderful ideas and motivation - she is a breath of fresh air.
[Fig.]
n.
Opposition to the disestablishment of the Church of England i.e.the English branch of the Western Christian Church, which combines Catholic and Protestant traditions, rejects the Pope’s authority, and has the monarch as its titular head
n.
Patient that has lost reactivity , reactions to stimulations, reflexes (Areflexia) = Dead or Comatous
n.
artificial long word coined to mean a lung disease known as silicosis, a type of pneumoconiosis caused by inhalation of ultra-microscopic particles of crystalline silica volcanic dust. It has the particularity of being the longest word in the English language published in a dictionary
Longer tech. terms exist (up to 189,819 letters!).The word, presumably coined in 1935 by E.M. Smith (pres. of the National Puzzlers'League) in imitation of very long medical terms, contains 45 letters
id.
expression meaning that one should not criticize someone else for a mistake that he/she also makes or a flaw that he/she also has
To add entries to your own vocabulary, become a member of Reverso community or login if you are already a member. It's easy and only takes a few seconds:
Or sign up in the traditional way

Advertising
Advertising