freezing point meaning, freezing point definition | English Cobuild dictionary

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freezing point

  
     ( freezing points    plural  ) , freezing-point  
1       n-uncount   Freezing point is 0° Celsius, the temperature at which water freezes. Freezing point is often used when talking about the weather.  
usu above/below/to N  
The temperature remained below freezing point throughout the day.     
2       n-count   The freezing point of a particular substance is the temperature at which it freezes.  
usu with poss  
Translation English Cobuild Collins Dictionary  
Collins
freezing  
1       adj   If you say that something is freezing or freezing cold, you are emphasizing that it is very cold.,   (emphasis)    The cinema was freezing., ...a freezing January afternoon.     
2       adj   If you say that you are freezing or freezing cold, you emphasizing that you feel very cold.  
v-link ADJ     (emphasis)    `You must be freezing,' she said.     
3       n-uncount   Freezing means the same as freezing point.  
It's 15 degrees below freezing.     
4   
    freeze  


freezing point        ( freezing points    plural  ) , freezing-point  
1       n-uncount   Freezing point is 0° Celsius, the temperature at which water freezes. Freezing point is often used when talking about the weather.  
usu above/below/to N  
The temperature remained below freezing point throughout the day.     
2       n-count   The freezing point of a particular substance is the temperature at which it freezes.  
usu with poss  

Translation English Cobuild Collins Dictionary  

Collins

freezing

  
  
arctic, biting, bitter, chill, chilled, cold as ice, cutting, frost-bound, frosty, glacial, icy, numbing, parky     (Brit. informal)   penetrating, polar, raw, Siberian, wintry  

English Collins Dictionary - English synonyms & Thesaurus  

See also:

frenzied, free, freewheeling

Collaborative Dictionary     English Cobuild
n.
the point where a minor change turns into a major and irreversible one
[Bus.] E.g. : Some have anticipated that social media would be the tipping point of web marketing.
n.
point of view
In cinema, refers to camera technique (caméra subjective).
exp.
ça ne sert à rien de pleurer ; ce qui est fait est fait ; inutile de se lamenter sur une chose qu'on ne peut pas changer
n.
a point in a system that is isolated from other parts of the architecture
[Tech.]
exp.
reach an extreme point or an upper limit; exhaust all options or resources
n.
the diametrically opposite point on Earth's surface for a specific place
id.
go mad; become extremely and uncontrollably angry, often to the point of violence
[Slang];[US];[Fam.] Derives from a series of incidents from 1986 onward in which US Postal Service workers shot and killed managers, fellow workers, and members of the police or general public in acts of mass murder.
n.
series of concentric, expanding circles caused by ripples in water from a central point
n.
Phrase used when someone has brought all the evidences to support his point of view; "I'm done with explanations"
exp.
(about a movie or TV series) reach a point when, due to a unauthentic scene, it loses the appreciation of the public
made popular by "Indiana Jones" whose hero survives an explosion by hiding in a fridge
exp.
expression used to point out that one has to struggle or suffer to achieve his goal
Jason: Damn it! I can't take it anymore. This exercise is killing me! Ray: Yeah but it’ll help you lose weight. Don't you know? No pain, no gain!
id.
avoid the main topic ; discuss a matter without coming to the point ; to not speak directly/frankly/bluntly about the issue
Ex: Please, stop beating around the bush and get to the point! Also: beat about the bush
exp.
worry about something; be concerned about smth. (to the point of not being able to fall asleep)
id.
expression used to point out that one will eventually face the consequences of his own actions
n.
to get so focused on the details or intricacies of something that you miss the big picture or the main point
His book subject is quite good, but he tends to miss the forest for the trees. (tending to get in too much detail and miss the essence).
exp.
used to point out that small problems or unpleasant events can in the end help things get better
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