many people synonym, many people definition | Thesaurus

Collins

many  


      adj  
1    abundant, copious, countless, divers     (archaic)   frequent, innumerable, manifold, multifarious, multifold, multitudinous, myriad, numerous, profuse, sundry, umpteen     (informal)   varied, various  
      n  
2    a horde, a lot, a mass, a multitude, a thousand and one, heaps     (informal)   large numbers, lots     (informal)   piles     (informal)   plenty, scores, tons     (informal)   umpteen     (informal)  
3    the many      crowd, hoi polloi, majority, masses, multitude, people, rank and file  
English Collins Dictionary - English synonyms & Thesaurus  
See also:

mangy, manly, man, mainly

Collaborative Dictionary     English Thesaurus
n.
people
Slang; used as written abbreviation
n.
ruling other people things
I respect the people in the past who were dominant and had power to control a government such as Nobutaka Oda who was a samurai because he controlled almost all areas in Japan.
n.
characteristic of awesome people or things
n.
one who solves people's problems
n.
face that people are showing during orgasm
SLANG
v.
snubbing people by using one's mobile phone
[Neologism] portmanteau word : phone + snubbing
n.
a player who asks too many funny questions that can be related as being stupid
Origin of the word is a "newbie" that can be shortened as a Newb
adj.
Term used to describe low grade marijuana. This type of marijuana is usually brown, seedy, dry. The term is also used by many pot heads to describe anything that is low grade.
n.
Makes new purchases everyday keep up to make a new position with many individual connection gainers in the winning economy.
n.
One place to find many different unique antiques, collectibles, and novelty items
n.
an ambitious woman who thinks her career really matters more than many things and is not willing to compromise on it
n.
person who assists elderly people in their daily life
exp.
when you are happy, people will want to be around you and share your happiness, but when you are sad, people will avoid you.
v.
to lie lazily (in the sun): lizards bask on rocks, people bask on beaches. Also fig: to bask in someone's reflected glory; to bask in media attention.
n.
in American English, 'dirt' is what British people call 'soil' ('put some dirt in a plant pot'). In British English, dirt has the connotation of being dirty ('you've got some dirt on your shoe')
v.
meet people on a chat on Internet or via e-mail or social networks. meet virtually and not physically
INTERNET
n.
classical African concept, humanist phylosophy focusing on people`s interrelations. It is originary from Bantu languages.
"I am what I am because of who we all are" , "Live consciuosly" are sayings belonging to this phylosophy
n.
rules concerning what people are owed to or allowed of, according to ethical principles of freedom and applied in society
n.
police crowd management technique that consists of herding people into a compact group. AKA corralling
n.
remnants of disputes that make a relationship between people or companies difficult to maintain, even without an open dispute
adj.
always thinking of what other people want and being anxious not to disturb them
I want to be a considerate person who always help friends when they are in trouble.
n.
financial support for project provided collectively by a network of people on the Internet
exp.
expression used to describe an attempt to organize a difficult or unpredictable situation; trying to coordinate a group of people who tend to act chaotically
[Bus.] E.g: Some say that managing a team is herding cats.
n.
using a lot of people (Internet users mostly) to contribute to a collective work. For example Wikipedia uses crowdsourcing
exp.
expression used for pointing out that, if you love someone, you accept also things and people dear to the person you love
n.
expression used for describing a perfect compatibility (between people, things, factors etc.)
exp.
if people live in each other's pocket, they spend a lot of time together
exp.
The actual say is: "You can catch more flies with honey than with vinegar" This means that it is easier to persuade people if you use polite arguments and flattery than if you are confrontational.
id.
expression meaning that one should not criticize someone else for a mistake that he/she also makes or a flaw that he/she also has

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"Collins Cobuild English Dictionary for Advanced Learners 4th edition published in 2003 © HarperCollins Publishers 1987, 1995, 2001, 2003 and Collins A-Z Thesaurus 1st edition first published in 1995 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995"
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