to feel cheerful meaning, to feel cheerful definition | English Cobuild dictionary

Collins

feel

  

      vb   , feels, feeling, felt  
1    to perceive (something) by touching  
2    to have a physical or emotional sensation of (something)  
to feel heat, to feel anger     
3    tr   to examine (something) by touch  
4    tr   to find (one's way) by testing or cautious exploration  
5    copula   to seem or appear in respect of the sensation given  
I feel tired, it feels warm     
6    to have an indistinct, esp. emotional conviction; sense (esp. in the phrase feel in one's bones)  
7    intr; foll by: for   to show sympathy or compassion (towards)  
I feel for you in your sorrow     
8    to believe, think, or be of the opinion (that)  
he feels he must resign     
9    tr; often foll. by up  
Slang   to pass one's hands over the sexual organs of  
10    feel like   to have an inclination (for something or doing something)  
I don't feel like going to the pictures     
11    feel (quite) oneself   to be fit and sure of oneself  
12    feel up to   usually used with a negative or in a question   to be fit enough for (something or doing something)  
I don't feel up to going out tonight     
      n  
13    the act or an instance of feeling, esp. by touching  
14    the quality of or an impression from something perceived through feeling  
the house has a homely feel about it     
15    the sense of touch  
the fabric is rough to the feel     
16    an instinctive aptitude; knack  
she's got a feel for this sort of work     
     (Old English felan; related to Old High German fuolen, Old Norse falma to grope, Latin palma palm1)  


artificial feel  
      n   a system, used in aircraft that have fully powered control surfaces, providing the pilot with simulated aerodynamic forces on the controls  
feel-good  
      adj   causing or characterized by a feeling of self-satisfaction  
feel-good factor     
English Collins Dictionary - English Definition & Thesaurus  
Collaborative Dictionary     English Definition
v.
to feel ashamed
v.
If someone freaks out, or something freaks them out mm they suddenly feel surprised,upset,angry,or confused
[US] I remember the first time I went onstage, I freaked out completely.
n.
To delibaretly make someone feel frightened especially so that they will do what you want ; scared and follow directions of yours or what you want thing to be ...
exp.
think alike about a certain topic; be aligned in opinions; feel the same way about smth.

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"Collins English Dictionary 5th Edition first published in 2000 © HarperCollins Publishers 1979, 1986, 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000 and Collins A-Z Thesaurus 1st edition first published in 1995 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995"