to be on very good terms with sb definition, to be on very good terms with sb meaning | English dictionary

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very  


      adv  
1    (intensifier) used to add emphasis to adjectives that are able to be graded  
very good, very tall     
      adj   prenominal  
2    (intensifier) used with nouns preceded by a definite article or possessive determiner, in order to give emphasis to the significance, appropriateness or relevance of a noun in a particular context, or to give exaggerated intensity to certain nouns  
the very man I want to see, his very name struck terror, the very back of the room     
3    (intensifier) used in metaphors to emphasize the applicability of the image to the situation described  
he was a very lion in the fight     
4    Archaic  
a    real or true; genuine  
the very living God     
b    lawful  
the very vengeance of the gods     
     (C13: from Old French verai true, from Latin verax true, from verus true)  
In strict usage adverbs of degree such as very, too, quite, really, and extremely are used only to qualify adjectives: he is very happy; she is too sad. By this rule, these words should not be used to qualify past participles that follow the verb to be, since they would then be technically qualifying verbs. With the exception of certain participles, such as tired or disappointed, that have come to be regarded as adjectives, all other past participles are qualified by adverbs such as much, greatly, seriously, or excessively: he has been much (not very) inconvenienced; she has been excessively (not too) criticized  


very high frequency  
      n   a radio-frequency band or radio frequency lying between 30 and 300 megahertz,   (Abbrev.)    VHF  
very large-scale integration  
      n     (Computing)   the process of fabricating a few thousand logic gates or more in a single integrated circuit,   (Abbrev.)    VLSI  
Very light  
      n   a coloured flare fired from a special pistol (Very pistol) for signalling at night, esp. at sea  
     (C19: named after Edward W. Very (1852--1910), US naval ordnance officer)  
very low frequency  
      n   a radio-frequency band or radio frequency lying between 3 and 30 kilohertz,   (Abbrev.)    VLF  
Very Reverend  
      n   a title of respect for a variety of ecclesiastical officials, such as deans and the superiors of some religious houses  
English Collins Dictionary - English Definition & Thesaurus  
Collaborative Dictionary     English Definition
exp.
be very expensive; cost a lot
v.
to be lost
he went missing my dog went missing for three days
adj.
able to be seen
[US] Ex.: the car in front of us was visible because we had the lights on
exp.
to be unable to think for oneself
used in a condescending way
exp.
to be left in a state of confusion or uncertainty
exp.
he is a very good seller
n.
[child] to be sent to a care organization run by the social services, or to be looked after by foster parents
exp.
to be likely to do something
banks set to miss lending targets
exp.
think alike about a certain topic; be aligned in opinions; feel the same way about smth.
adj.
to be gutsy means to have guts
to be gutsy: avoir du cran
adj.
(about persons) not to be trusted; dangerous
exp.
When sth sounds too good to be true and not as good as it seems to be and you suspect that there is a hidden problem
v.
A culture of internet only jobs has coined the phrase Wirk. Wirk simply means Internet Work. Internet work is defined by job opportunities that did not exist before the rise of the internet and furthermore the work is likely to be carried out over the internet and payment received for work undertaken via the internet. Wirk describes both full time and part time internet work. Because of the nature of Wirk and the ability for anyone that has internet connection to earn money from Wirk, it is currently more likely to be a part time occupation than full time. Paid Online Questionnaires, Content Writing, Search Marketing are all examples of Wirk.
This is a term rising in popularity
exp.
A thing which ought to be perfectly vertical but which through fault is slanting is said to be off plumb.
exp.
"to be up for it" means to be willing to participate
she's really up for it: elle est partante
n.
a person paid by the state to work in the interests of the nation who considers it to be a ‘right’ to be able abuse his or her authority to ensure personal gain for himself or herself at the expense of the nation…
neologism ... created on some blog
n.
this expression means 'he is very good at criticizing others but he can't accept criticism from others'
exp.
not to be able to act like a man, be a pussy
slang
n.
the process of reaching a conclusion about something because of other things that you know to be true
[US] I often find my stuff by using deduction but sometimes it doesn't help at all.
n.
Someone (usually a young man) who tries unsuccessfully to be funny by making lame jokes and doing stupid things
US English, colloquial
exp.
The transference of virtual assets and value stored on web possible to be distributed upon user’s death.
[Tech.]
n.
To delibaretly make someone feel frightened especially so that they will do what you want ; scared and follow directions of yours or what you want thing to be ...
exp.
User’s online presence that hold the potential to be the key to ones online identity, value and worth.
[Tech.]
n.
Something that as soon as it is done becomes decided upon to repeat the next year and years to come. Does not necessarily have to had been done previous years to be defined an instant tradition.
exp.
home is the best place to be no matter where it is
exp.
expression used for warning that, although something seems to be over, settled, new events that could change the situation may occur
syn.: "it ain't over till it's over"
exp.
when you are happy, people will want to be around you and share your happiness, but when you are sad, people will avoid you.

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"Collins English Dictionary 5th Edition first published in 2000 © HarperCollins Publishers 1979, 1986, 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000 and Collins A-Z Thesaurus 1st edition first published in 1995 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995"
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