there's more to come definition, there's more to come meaning | English dictionary

Collins

nothing  


      pron  
1    indefinite   no thing; not anything, as of an implied or specified class of things  
I can give you nothing     
2    no part or share  
to have nothing to do with this crime     
3    a matter of no importance or significance  
it doesn't matter, it's nothing     
4    indicating the absence of anything perceptible; nothingness  
5    indicating the absence of meaning, value, worth, etc.  
to amount to nothing     
6    zero quantity; nought  
7    be nothing to  
a    not to concern or be significant to (someone)  
b    to be not nearly as good as  
8    have or be nothing to do with   to have no connection with  
9    have (got) nothing on  
a    to have no engagements to keep  
b    to be undressed or naked  
c    Informal   to compare unfavourably with  
10    in nothing flat  
Informal   in almost no time; very quickly or soon  
11    nothing but   not something other than; only  
12    nothing doing  
Informal   an expression of dismissal, disapproval, lack of compliance with a request, etc.  
13    nothing if not   at the very least; certainly  
14    nothing less than or nothing short of   downright; truly  
15    (there's) nothing for it   (there's) no choice; no other course  
16    there's nothing like          a general expression of praise  
there's nothing like a good cup of tea     
17    there's nothing to it   it is very simple, easy, etc.  
18    think nothing of  
a    to regard as routine, easy, or natural  
b    to have no compunction or hesitation about  
c    to have a very low opinion of  
19    to say nothing of   as well as; even disregarding  
he was warmly dressed in a shirt and heavy jumper, to say nothing of his thick overcoat     
20    stop at nothing   to be prepared to do anything; be unscrupulous or ruthless  
      adv  
21    in no way; not at all  
he looked nothing like his brother     
      n  
22    Informal   a person or thing of no importance or significance  
23    sweet nothings   words of endearment or affection  
     (Old English nathing, nan thing, from nan none1 + thing1)  
Nothing normally takes a singular verb, but when nothing but is followed by a plural form of a noun, a plural verb is usually used: it was a large room where nothing but souvenirs were sold  
English Collins Dictionary - English Definition & Thesaurus  
Collaborative Dictionary     English Definition
exp.
there is something really obvious that no one talks about
n.
a very creative person; someone who is always able to come up with fresh ideas
[Bus.]
n.
Something that as soon as it is done becomes decided upon to repeat the next year and years to come. Does not necessarily have to had been done previous years to be defined an instant tradition.
exp.
come on
Slang; written abbreviation, there`s no difference in pronunciation for "c`mon "and "come on".
exp.
quit disobeying; start acting like someone would want to
E.g. Finally, her husband has come to heel and they will buy a new car, as she wants.
exp.
to become more serious
q.
This expression means it is better to let one's emotions out, rather than bottled up inside. It is also often said when someone has gas.
this is just something my grandmother would say in cajun french
exp.
acronyme de "there is no alternative"
phrase chère jadis à Mme THATCHER reprise au G20 de novembre 2011 contre le Premier ministre grec et son référendum
id.
the carrot is more effective than the stick
exp.
The actual say is: "You can catch more flies with honey than with vinegar" This means that it is easier to persuade people if you use polite arguments and flattery than if you are confrontational.
exp.
what's up
sms like writing, incorrect form in English
exp.
it's ready!
or "dinner's ready!"; "lunch is ready!"; "breakfast's ready!"
o.
could refer to a very weak cup of tea/pint of beer
n.
(in an auction, negotiation or other business competition) the situation in which the winning party has overrated the pursued object
[Bus.]
n.
a mess, a failure
[Slang];[UK] it comes from the cooking domain where the phrase described a dish that was not tasty enough and therefore thrown away to dogs
exp.
stop talking; refrain from saying something
informal
exp.
the best, the dog's bollocks , the bee's knees
exp.
the duck's nuts, the best, the dog's bollocks
exp.
When sth sounds too good to be true and not as good as it seems to be and you suspect that there is a hidden problem
exp.
be kept waiting
exp.
The duck's nuts, the best, the top.
exp.
to rattle someone's cage means to do something that is likely to annoy them or unsettle them
exp.
take credit for another person's accomplishment
exp.
kill someone; cause a big damage to someone
exp.
to lose one's temper
very familiar
exp.
(about a positive event/situation) happen out of the blue, without any effort from the impacted persons
v.
spoil someone's plans; spoil someone's pleasure or joy.
I hate to rain on your parade, but we will not be able to host your birthday party next week.
id.
make a lot of efforts to understand something
exp.
expression used to describe the practice of a company using internally the marketed products
[Bus.] expression originating from and widely used in software industry; the practice is also known as "dogfooding"

head

Reverso Community

  • Create your own vocabulary list
  • Contribute to the Collaborative Dictionary
  • Improve and share your linguistic knowledge
Advertising
"Collins English Dictionary 5th Edition first published in 2000 © HarperCollins Publishers 1979, 1986, 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000 and Collins A-Z Thesaurus 1st edition first published in 1995 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995"
Advertising