that's an understatement definition, that's an understatement meaning | English dictionary



      determiner   used before a singular n  
a    used preceding a noun that has been mentioned at some time or is understood  
that idea of yours     
b    (as pronoun)  
don't eat that, that's what I mean     
a    used preceding a noun that denotes something more remote or removed  
that dress is cheaper than this one, that building over there is for sale     
b    (as pronoun)  
that is John and this is his wife, give me that         Compare       this  
3    used to refer to something that is familiar  
that old chap from across the street     
4    and (all) that  
Informal   everything connected with the subject mentioned  
he knows a lot about building and that     
5    at that   completive-intensive   additionally, all things considered, or nevertheless  
he's a pleasant fellow at that, I might decide to go at that     
6    like that  
a    with ease; effortlessly  
he gave me the answer just like that     
b    of such a nature, character, etc.  
he paid for all our tickets — he's like that     
7    that is  
a    to be precise  
b    in other words  
c    for example  
8    that's more like it   that is better, an improvement, etc.  
9    that's that          there is no more to be done, discussed, etc.  
10    with (or at) that   thereupon; having said or done that  
      conj   subordinating  
11    used to introduce a noun clause  
I believe that you'll come     
12      (Also)    so that, in order that   used to introduce a clause of purpose  
they fought that others might have peace     
13    used to introduce a clause of result  
he laughed so hard that he cried     
14    used to introduce a clause after an understood sentence expressing desire, indignation, or amazement  
oh, that I had never lived!     
15    used with adjectives or adverbs to reinforce the specification of a precise degree already mentioned  
go just that fast and you should be safe     
16      (Also)    all that   usually used with a negative  
Informal   (intensifier)  
he wasn't that upset at the news     
17    Dialect   (intensifier)  
the cat was that weak after the fight     
18    used to introduce a restrictive relative clause  
the book that we want     
19    used to introduce a clause with the verb to be to emphasize the extent to which the preceding noun is applicable  
genius that she is, she outwitted the computer     
     (Old English thæt; related to Old Frisian thet, Old Norse, Old Saxon that, Old High German daz, Greek to, Latin istud, Sanskrit tad)  
Precise stylists maintain a distinction between that and which: that is used as a relative pronoun in restrictive clauses and which in nonrestrictive clauses. In the book that is on the table is mine, the clause that is on the table is used to distinguish one particular book (the one on the table) from another or others (which may be anywhere, but not on the table). In the book, which is on the table, is mine, the which clause is merely descriptive or incidental. The more formal the level of language, the more important it is to preserve the distinction between the two relative pronouns; but in informal or colloquial usage, the words are often used interchangeably  
English Collins Dictionary - English Definition & Thesaurus  
Collaborative Dictionary     English Definition
means "that's just the way it is"
c'est comme ça, point barre
cela dépasse les bornes
c'est gentil de votre part
c'est toi qui le dis
cà ne casse pas des briques
c'est çà
c'est du moins mon opinion
there is something really obvious that no one talks about
c'est du moins ce qu'il raconte
c'est un coup à se tuer
c'est bien un coup à lui
You say 'top that!' when you have achieved something and you want to challenge other people to do better
I know four celebrities - top that!
to rattle someone's cage means to do something that is likely to annoy them or unsettle them
take credit for another person's accomplishment
expression used to describe a lost opportunity or something that is unlikely to happen in the current circumstances
the duck's nuts, the best, the dog's bollocks
the best, the dog's bollocks , the bee's knees
when sth sounds too good to be true and not as good as it seems to be and you suspect that there is a hidden problem
The duck's nuts, the best, the top.
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"Collins English Dictionary 5th Edition first published in 2000 © HarperCollins Publishers 1979, 1986, 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000 and Collins A-Z Thesaurus 1st edition first published in 1995 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995"