something came up definition, something came up meaning | English dictionary

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something

  

      pron  
1    an unspecified or unknown thing; some thing  
he knows something you don't, take something warm with you     
2    something or other   one unspecified thing or an alternative thing  
3    an unspecified or unknown amount; bit  
something less than a hundred     
4    an impressive or important person, thing, or event  
isn't that something?     
      adv  
5    to some degree; a little; somewhat  
to look something like me     
6    foll by an adj  
Informal   (intensifier)  
it hurts something awful     


-something  
      n combining form  
a    a person whose age can be approximately expressed by a specified decade  
b    (as modifier)  
the thirtysomething market     
     (C20: from the US television series thirtysomething)  
English Collins Dictionary - English Definition & Thesaurus  
Collaborative Dictionary     English Definition
exp.
worry about something; be concerned about smth. (to the point of not being able to fall asleep)
exp.
to be likely to do something
banks set to miss lending targets
v.
change something into something better
Jesus can fanute water into wine.
v.
to feed something incorrectly
v.
not to include something
I want to try a diet that excludes dairy products.
n.
something excellent, impressive
E.g.: The concert was a real doozy.
n.
something easy to get
n.
something that improves morale
id.
put a stop to something
exp.
something is easy to do
v.
continue to have something; keep something
n.
making something known that was secret
v.
make something succeed strongly and rapidly
v.
the action of expanding, broaden something
exp.
go crazy about something, get enthusiastic
v.
say publicly that something should be done
I never advocate my opinion because I am shy to speak in front of many people.
v.
to try to judge something without calculating
Sentence: I always try estimating how much I will spend before going shopping.
n.
the greater number or part of something
"the majority of" can only refer to a number of things or people. When talking about an amount, "most of" should be used. Ex.: Most of (not the majority of) the harvest was saved.
exp.
stop talking; refrain from saying something
informal
n.
the most important or central part of something
[US] The core of the book focuses on the period between 1660 and 1857.
exp.
polite expression offering to do something for someone
exp.
little or no possibility of something to happen
exp.
go for something, take one's chances
id.
make a lot of efforts to understand something
exp.
expression used to designate something that happens very rarely
exp.
expression used to indicate that something happens very quickly
exp.
spend time and energy doing something that is pointless
expression arisen in the 15th century when Newcastle (England) was a major exporter of coal
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