rattle somebody's cage definition, rattle somebody's cage meaning | English dictionary

rattle somebody's cage exp.
to rattle someone's cage means to do something that is likely to annoy them or unsettle them

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Collaborative Dictionary     English Definition
use the authority given by a position (in society, in a company etc.) to determine someone to act in a certain manner
E.g: He is not eager to attend the event, but he has to be there because his boss pulled rank on him.
defeat someone with arguments during a discussion; knock out [Fig.]
take credit for another person's accomplishment
the duck's nuts, the best, the dog's bollocks
the best, the dog's bollocks , the bee's knees
The duck's nuts, the best, the top.
spoil someone's plans; spoil someone's pleasure or joy.
I hate to rain on your parade, but we will not be able to host your birthday party next week.
what's up
sms like writing, incorrect form in English
could refer to a very weak cup of tea/pint of beer
(in an auction, negotiation or other business competition) the situation in which the winning party has overrated the pursued object
a mess, a failure
[Slang];[UK] it comes from the cooking domain where the phrase described a dish that was not tasty enough and therefore thrown away to dogs
means a liquid is not clear: this tea's got bits in it, I don't like yogurt with bits in it
assez proche de l'idée de 'il y a à boire et à manger'
if people live in each other's pocket, they spend a lot of time together
stop talking; refrain from saying something
when sth sounds too good to be true and not as good as it seems to be and you suspect that there is a hidden problem
be kept waiting
kill someone; cause a big damage to someone
to dress up as somebody or something, as a children's game
to lose one's temper
very familiar
(about a positive event/situation) happen out of the blue, without any effort from the impacted persons
make a lot of efforts to understand something
expression used to describe the practice of a company using internally the marketed products
[Bus.] expression originating from and widely used in software industry; the practice is also known as "dogfooding"
one who solves people's problems
something is easy to do
it's the best there is
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1    to make or cause to make a rapid succession of short sharp sounds, as of loose pellets colliding when shaken in a container  
2    to shake or cause to shake with such a sound  
the explosion rattled the windows     
3    to send, move, drive, etc., with such a sound  
the car rattled along the country road     
4    intr; foll by: on   to chatter idly; talk, esp. at length  
he rattled on about his work     
5    tr; foll by: off, out etc.   to recite perfunctorily or rapidly  
6    tr  
Informal   to disconcert; make frightened or anxious  
7    a rapid succession of short sharp sounds  
8    a baby's toy filled with small pellets that rattle when shaken  
9    a series of loosely connected horny segments on the tail of a rattlesnake, vibrated to produce a rattling sound  
10    any of various European scrophulariaceous plants having a capsule in which the seeds rattle, such as Pedicularis palustris (red rattle) and Rhinanthus minor (yellow rattle)  
11    idle chatter  
12    an idle chatterer  
13      (Med)      another name for       rale  
     (C14: from Middle Dutch ratelen; related to Middle High German razzen, of imitative origin)  
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