i didn't see that coming definition, i didn't see that coming meaning | English dictionary

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that

  
  (unstressed)  
      determiner   used before a singular n  
1   
a    used preceding a noun that has been mentioned at some time or is understood  
that idea of yours     
b    (as pronoun)  
don't eat that, that's what I mean     
2   
a    used preceding a noun that denotes something more remote or removed  
that dress is cheaper than this one, that building over there is for sale     
b    (as pronoun)  
that is John and this is his wife, give me that         Compare       this  
3    used to refer to something that is familiar  
that old chap from across the street     
4    and (all) that  
Informal   everything connected with the subject mentioned  
he knows a lot about building and that     
5    at that   completive-intensive   additionally, all things considered, or nevertheless  
he's a pleasant fellow at that, I might decide to go at that     
6    like that  
a    with ease; effortlessly  
he gave me the answer just like that     
b    of such a nature, character, etc.  
he paid for all our tickets <emdash> he's like that     
7    that is  
a    to be precise  
b    in other words  
c    for example  
8    that's more like it   that is better, an improvement, etc.  
9    that's that          there is no more to be done, discussed, etc.  
10    with (or at) that   thereupon; having said or done that  
      conj   subordinating  
11    used to introduce a noun clause  
I believe that you'll come     
12      (Also)    so that, in order that   used to introduce a clause of purpose  
they fought that others might have peace     
13    used to introduce a clause of result  
he laughed so hard that he cried     
14    used to introduce a clause after an understood sentence expressing desire, indignation, or amazement  
oh, that I had never lived!     
      adv  
15    used with adjectives or adverbs to reinforce the specification of a precise degree already mentioned  
go just that fast and you should be safe     
16      (Also)    all that   usually used with a negative  
Informal   (intensifier)  
he wasn't that upset at the news     
17    Dialect   (intensifier)  
the cat was that weak after the fight     
      pron  
18    used to introduce a restrictive relative clause  
the book that we want     
19    used to introduce a clause with the verb to be to emphasize the extent to which the preceding noun is applicable  
genius that she is, she outwitted the computer     
     (Old English thæt; related to Old Frisian thet, Old Norse, Old Saxon that, Old High German daz, Greek to, Latin istud, Sanskrit tad)  
Precise stylists maintain a distinction between that and which: that is used as a relative pronoun in restrictive clauses and which in nonrestrictive clauses. In the book that is on the table is mine, the clause that is on the table is used to distinguish one particular book (the one on the table) from another or others (which may be anywhere, but not on the table). In the book, which is on the table, is mine, the which clause is merely descriptive or incidental. The more formal the level of language, the more important it is to preserve the distinction between the two relative pronouns; but in informal or colloquial usage, the words are often used interchangeably  
English Collins Dictionary - English Definition & Thesaurus  
See also:

that, that, all that, all that

Collaborative Dictionary     English Definition
n.
is a test process that is performed after the software has been changed in order to verify if the changes didn't affect other software parts
exp.
I can't understand it, I can't believe it, I can't accept it
exp.
¡no toques eso!
n.
Phrase used when someone has brought all the evidences to support his point of view; "I'm done with explanations"
n.
"It's a list of all the people and things I hate so much I want to hit them in the face with a shovel." Concept coming from the Marian Keyes novel, The Mystery of Mercy Close (2012).
exp.
if you can't be arsed to do something, you can't be bothered to do it (you are too lazy to do it)
colloquial, British, very common
exp.
expression used when referring to something that is unlikely to happen soon (not in the time interval that one can resist holding his breath)
E.g.: "Will the economy recover any soon?" - "Don't hold your breath."
exp.
I have no idea; I don't have a clue
[Informal] E.g.: Why was she upset? - Beats me!
v.
A culture of internet only jobs has coined the phrase Wirk. Wirk simply means Internet Work. Internet work is defined by job opportunities that did not exist before the rise of the internet and furthermore the work is likely to be carried out over the internet and payment received for work undertaken via the internet. Wirk describes both full time and part time internet work. Because of the nature of Wirk and the ability for anyone that has internet connection to earn money from Wirk, it is currently more likely to be a part time occupation than full time. Paid Online Questionnaires, Content Writing, Search Marketing are all examples of Wirk.
This is a term rising in popularity
n.
means a liquid is not clear: this tea's got bits in it, I don't like yogurt with bits in it
assez proche de l'idée de 'il y a à boire et à manger'
exp.
acronym of As Far As I Know, from the best of my knowledge, according to the information that I have
n.
a website that did not undergo any change for a long period of time
[Comp.];[Slang]
n.
addendum to a contract in general that you do not wish for everyone to see
[Leg.]
exp.
You say 'top that!' when you have achieved something and you want to challenge other people to do better
I know four celebrities - top that!
n.
person that you date
exp.
face a specific situation; act in a certain way
E.g.: John went out of rehab a few days ago and he is determined to not go down that road again.
exp.
expression used to describe a lost opportunity or something that is unlikely to happen in the current circumstances
n.
something that improves morale
exp.
t'as pas compris, tu veux que je te fasses un dessin?
what part of "you can't come with us" don't you understand? what part of "NO" don't you understand?
exp.
expression used for warning that, although something seems to be over, settled, new events that could change the situation may occur
syn.: "it ain't over till it's over"
exp.
consider that two parties don't owe anything to each other
exp.
a humorous way of saying that someone doesn't like or love the speaker.
[Hum.] E.g.: You've seen the way she treated me last time we met. It's clear: she loves me not.
id.
expression used to show full agreement on smth.
n.
face that people are showing during orgasm
SLANG

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"Collins English Dictionary 5th Edition first published in 2000 © HarperCollins Publishers 1979, 1986, 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000 and Collins A-Z Thesaurus 1st edition first published in 1995 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995"
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