have (got) the wood on definition, have (got) the wood on meaning | English dictionary



1    the hard fibrous substance consisting of xylem tissue that occurs beneath the bark in trees, shrubs, and similar plants  
   Related adjs       ligneous       xyloid  
2    the trunks of trees that have been cut and prepared for use as a building material  
3    a collection of trees, shrubs, herbs, grasses, etc., usually dominated by one or a few species of tree: usually smaller than a forest  
an oak wood         Related adj       sylvan  
4    fuel; firewood  
5      (Golf)  
a    a long-shafted club with a broad wooden or metal head, used for driving: numbered from 1 to 7 according to size, angle of face, etc.  
b    (as modifier)  
a wood shot     
6      (Tennis, etc.)   the frame of a racket  
he hit a winning shot off the wood     
7    one of the biased wooden bowls used in the game of bowls  
8      (Music)      short for       woodwind  
See also  
    woods       3  
a    casks, barrels, etc., made of wood  
b    from the wood   (of a beverage) from a wooden container rather than a metal or glass one  
10    have (got) the wood on            (Austral. and N.Z.)  
informal   to have an advantage over  
11    out of the wood or woods   clear of or safe from dangers or doubts  
we're not out of the wood yet     
12    see the wood for the trees   used with a negative   to obtain a general view of a situation, problem, etc., without allowing details to cloud one's analysis  
he can't see the wood for the trees     
13    modifier   made of, used for, employing, or handling wood  
a wood fire     
14    modifier   dwelling in, concerning, or situated in a wood  
a wood nymph     
15    tr   to plant a wood upon  
16    to supply or be supplied with fuel or firewood,   (See also)        woods  
     (Old English widu, wudu; related to Old High German witu, Old Norse vithr)  
  woodless      adj  
English Collins Dictionary - English Definition & Thesaurus  
      vb   , has, having, had   mainly tr  
1    to be in material possession of; own  
he has two cars     
2    to possess as a characteristic quality or attribute  
he has dark hair     
3    to receive, take, or obtain  
she had a present from him, have a look     
4    to hold or entertain in the mind  
to have an idea     
5    to possess a knowledge or understanding of  
I have no German     
6    to experience or undergo  
to have a shock     
7    to be infected with or suffer from  
to have a cold     
8    to gain control of or advantage over  
you have me on that point     
9    usually passive  
Slang   to cheat or outwit  
he was had by that dishonest salesman     
10    foll by: on   to exhibit (mercy, compassion, etc., towards)  
have mercy on us, Lord     
11    to engage or take part in  
to have a conversation     
12    to arrange, carry out, or hold  
to have a party     
13    to cause, compel, or require to (be, do, or be done)  
have my shoes mended     
14    takes an infinitive with: to   used as an auxiliary to express compulsion or necessity  
I had to run quickly to escape him     
15    to eat, drink, or partake of  
to have a good meal     
16    Taboo slang   to have sexual intercourse with  
he had her on the sofa     
17    used with a negative   to tolerate or allow  
I won't have all this noise     
18    to declare, state, or assert  
rumour has it that they will marry     
19    to put or place  
I'll have the sofa in this room     
20    to receive as a guest  
to have three people to stay     
21    to beget or bear (offspring)  
she had three children     
22    takes a past participle   used as an auxiliary to form compound tenses expressing completed action  
I have gone, I shall have gone, I would have gone, I had gone     
23    had better or best   ought to: used to express compulsion, obligation, etc.  
you had better go     
24    had rather or sooner   to consider or find preferable that  
I had rather you left at once     
25    have done      See       done       3  
26    have had it  
a    to be exhausted, defeated, or killed  
b    to have lost one's last chance  
c    to become unfashionable  
27    have it   to win a victory  
28    have it away (or off)  
Taboo     (Brit)  
slang   to have sexual intercourse  
29    have it coming  
Informal   to be about to receive or to merit punishment or retribution  
30    have it in for  
Informal   to wish or intend harm towards  
31    have it so good   to have so many benefits, esp. material benefits  
32    have to do with  
a    to have dealings or associate with  
I have nothing to do with her     
b    to be of relevance to  
this has nothing to do with you     
33    I have it  
Informal   I know the answer  
34    let (someone) have it  
Slang   to launch or deliver an attack on, esp. to discharge a firearm at (someone)  
35    not having any   foll by: of  
Informal   refusing to take part or be involved (in)  
36    usually pl   a person or group of people in possession of wealth, security, etc.  
the haves and the have-nots         See also       have at       have in       have on       have out       have up  
     (Old English habban; related to Old Norse hafa, Old Saxon hebbian, Old High German haben, Latin habere)  

Informal   (of people attempting arduous or dangerous tasks) brave or spirited  
a have-a-go pensioner     
have at  
      vb   intr, prep  
Archaic   to make an opening attack on, esp. in fencing  
have in  
      vb   tr, adv  
1    to ask (a person) to give a service  
we must have the electrician in to mend the fire     
2    to invite to one's home  
      n   usually pl   a person or group of people in possession of relatively little material wealth  
have on  
      vb   tr  
1    usually adv   to wear  
2    usually adv   to have (a meeting or engagement) arranged as a commitment  
what does your boss have on this afternoon?     
3    adv  
Informal   to trick or tease (a person)  
4    prep   to have available (information or evidence, esp. when incriminating) about (a person)  
the police had nothing on him, so they let him go     
have out  
      vb   tr, adv  
1    to settle (a matter) or come to (a final decision), esp. by fighting or by frank discussion (often in the phrase have it out)  
2    to have extracted or removed  
I had a tooth out     
have up  
      vb   tr, adv; usually passive   to cause to appear for trial  
he was had up for breaking and entering     

English Collins Dictionary - English Definition & Thesaurus  



1    hold, keep, obtain, occupy, own, possess, retain  
2    accept, acquire, gain, get, obtain, procure, receive, secure, take  
3    comprehend, comprise, contain, embody, include, take in  
4    endure, enjoy, experience, feel, meet with, suffer, sustain, undergo  
5      (slang)   cheat, deceive, dupe, fool, outwit, stiff     (slang)   swindle, take in     (informal)   trick  
6      (usually)       have to   be bound, be compelled, be forced, be obliged, have got to, must, ought, should  
7    allow, consider, entertain, permit, put up with     (informal)   think about, tolerate  
8    bear, beget, bring forth, bring into the world, deliver, give birth to  
9    have had it        (informal)   be defeated, be exhausted, be finished, be out, be past it     (informal)   be pooped     (U.S. slang)   be stonkered     (slang)  

have on  
1    be clothed in, be dressed in, wear  
2    be committed to, be engaged to, have on the agenda, have planned  
3      (of a person)   deceive, kid     (informal)   play a joke on, pull someone's leg, take the mickey, tease, trick, wind up     (Brit. slang)  

English Collins Dictionary - English synonyms & Thesaurus  

Collaborative Dictionary     English Definition
expression meaning that several or all members of a family have something in common (a skill, a feature, a path or a behavior)
E.g.: He became an actor too. It runs in the family.
(in neomarxist thought) the second main exploitive social class: The bourgeoisie of formation. The members of the formoisie have human capital, receive high wages (the most frequently thanks to their diplomas) and consume more than the world GDP. (neologism 1993 Yanick Toutain)
[Hum. Sc.] The formoisie is the social class that created social-democracy and stalinism.
(in neomarxist thought) the third main exploitive social class: The bourgeoisie of innovation. The members of the innovoisie have usually human innovating capital. They receive (as individuals) copyrights or patent rights and consume more than the world GDP. (neologism 1996 Yanick Toutain)
Materialistic concept neonewtonist. In its measures, this variation of length of traveled route (by unit of time) by a group of photons ( φ is the initial of photons) - the light signal - is equal to what is collectively called " radial velocity". It distinguishes itself from it in its gnoseology.
Phys. Concept before 2007 The redshift indicates the phi-speed of a star. But do not give the immediate knowledge of its absolute speed.
n. 1. friendly, affectionate love; familial love 2. (astrology) horizon in the Leo/Aquarius axis 3. (sociology) the love between friends
A living being with storge feels a strong sense of duty and is often willing to die to protect this love.
series of functions performed by an electronic system independently of (not connected to) the cyberspace.
(in an auction, negotiation or other business competition) the situation in which the winning party has overrated the pursued object
scallion (synonym)
(metaphorically) die
small handbag without handles
have a great time; enjoy oneself
casser en (morceaux, deux)
bitch (alternative term)
acronym of Lunar Module, little vehicle created especially to move on the moon during XXth century 's space conquest.
(metaphorically) manipulation attempt
His speech was nothing but smoke and mirrors
means a liquid is not clear: this tea's got bits in it, I don't like yogurt with bits in it
assez proche de l'idée de 'il y a à boire et à manger'
buttocks of (adult) woman
Slang; refers to a person's "bottom," in American English. A bit more polite than "ass," less clinical than "buttocks."
un bon temps (sport)
to say, pronounce, speak
ex.: The child sounded out each word out loud as she read her book.
expression used for saying that someone is worth being kept close (as a friend, partner..)
boire quelque chose dans (une tasse)
in American English, 'dirt' is what British people call 'soil' ('put some dirt in a plant pot'). In British English, dirt has the connotation of being dirty ('you've got some dirt on your shoe')
cell mate (in a prison)
(of sound) hollow and deep-sounding
tending to repair (also reparatory)
To add entries to your own vocabulary, become a member of Reverso community or login if you are already a member. It's easy and only takes a few seconds:
Or sign up in the traditional way

  • Create your own vocabulary list
  • Contribute to the Collaborative Dictionary
  • Improve and share your linguistic knowledge
"Collins English Dictionary 5th Edition first published in 2000 © HarperCollins Publishers 1979, 1986, 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000 and Collins A-Z Thesaurus 1st edition first published in 1995 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995"