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full

  
[2]  
      vb   (of cloth, yarn, etc.) to become or to make (cloth, yarn, etc.) heavier and more compact during manufacture through shrinking and beating or pressing  
     (C14: from Old French fouler, ultimately from Latin fullo a fuller1)  
English Collins Dictionary - English Definition & Thesaurus  
Collins
full   [1]  
      adj  
1    holding or containing as much as possible; filled to capacity or near capacity  
2    abundant in supply, quantity, number, etc.  
full of energy     
3    having consumed enough food or drink  
4    (esp. of the face or figure) rounded or plump; not thin  
5    prenominal   with no part lacking; complete  
a full dozen     
6    prenominal   with all privileges, rights, etc.; not restricted  
a full member     
7    prenominal   of, relating to, or designating a relationship established by descent from the same parents  
full brother     
8    filled with emotion or sentiment  
a full heart     
9    postpositive; foll by: of   occupied or engrossed (with)  
full of his own projects     
10      (Music)  
a    powerful or rich in volume and sound  
b    completing a piece or section; concluding  
a full close     
11    (of a garment, esp. a skirt) containing a large amount of fabric; of ample cut  
12    (of sails, etc.) distended by wind  
13    (of wine, such as a burgundy) having a heavy body  
14    (of a colour) containing a large quantity of pure hue as opposed to white or grey; rich; saturated  
15    Informal   drunk  
16      (Nautical)      another term for       close-hauled  
17    full of pride or conceit; egoistic  
18    filled to capacity  
the cinema was full up     
19    (esp. of a pack of hounds) in hot pursuit of quarry  
20    at the height of activity  
the party was in full swing     
      adv  
21   
a    completely; entirely  
b    (in combination)  
full-grown, full-fledged     
22    exactly; directly; right  
he hit him full in the stomach     
23    very; extremely (esp. in the phrase full well)  
24    full out   with maximum effort or speed  
      n  
25    the greatest degree, extent, etc.  
26      (Brit)   a ridge of sand or shingle along a seashore  
27    in full   without omitting, decreasing, or shortening  
we paid in full for our mistake     
28    to the full   to the greatest extent; thoroughly; fully  
      vb  
29    tr     (Needlework)   to gather or tuck  
30    intr   (of the moon) to be fully illuminated  
     (Old English; related to Old Norse fullr, Old High German foll, Latin plenus, Greek pleres; see fill)  
  fullness     (esp. U.S.)  
  fulness      n  

English Collins Dictionary - English Definition & Thesaurus  

Collins
perfect  
      adj  
1    having all essential elements  
2    unblemished; faultless  
a perfect gemstone     
3    correct or precise  
perfect timing     
4    utter or absolute  
a perfect stranger     
5    excellent in all respects  
a perfect day     
6      (Maths)   exactly divisible into equal integral or polynomial roots  
36 is a perfect square     
7      (Botany)  
a    (of flowers) having functional stamens and pistils  
b    (of plants) having all parts present  
8      (Grammar)   denoting a tense of verbs used in describing an action that has been completed by the subject. In English this is a compound tense, formed with have or has plus the past participle  
9      (Music)  
a    of or relating to the intervals of the unison, fourth, fifth, and octave  
b    (of a cadence) ending on the tonic chord, giving a feeling of conclusion,   (Also)    full, final             Compare       imperfect       6  
10    Archaic   positive certain, or assured  
      n  
11      (Grammar)  
a    the perfect tense  
b    a verb in this tense  
      vb   tr  
12    to make perfect; improve to one's satisfaction  
he is in Paris to perfect his French     
13    to make fully accomplished  
14      (Printing)   to print the reverse side of (a printed sheet of paper)  
     (C13: from Latin perfectus, from perficere to perform, from per through + facere to do)  
  perfectness      n  
For most of its meanings, the adjective perfect describes an absolute state, i.e. one that cannot be qualified; thus something is either perfect or not perfect, and cannot be more perfect or less perfect. However when perfect means excellent in all respects, a comparative can be used with it without absurdity: the next day the weather was even more perfect  


chock-full   , choke-full, chuck-full  
      adj   postpositive   completely full  
     (C17 choke-full; see choke, full)  
choke-full  
      adj      a less common spelling of       chock-full  
chuck-full  
      adj      a less common spelling of       chock-full  
cram-full  
      adj   stuffed full  
full   [1]  
      adj  
1    holding or containing as much as possible; filled to capacity or near capacity  
2    abundant in supply, quantity, number, etc.  
full of energy     
3    having consumed enough food or drink  
4    (esp. of the face or figure) rounded or plump; not thin  
5    prenominal   with no part lacking; complete  
a full dozen     
6    prenominal   with all privileges, rights, etc.; not restricted  
a full member     
7    prenominal   of, relating to, or designating a relationship established by descent from the same parents  
full brother     
8    filled with emotion or sentiment  
a full heart     
9    postpositive; foll by: of   occupied or engrossed (with)  
full of his own projects     
10      (Music)  
a    powerful or rich in volume and sound  
b    completing a piece or section; concluding  
a full close     
11    (of a garment, esp. a skirt) containing a large amount of fabric; of ample cut  
12    (of sails, etc.) distended by wind  
13    (of wine, such as a burgundy) having a heavy body  
14    (of a colour) containing a large quantity of pure hue as opposed to white or grey; rich; saturated  
15    Informal   drunk  
16      (Nautical)      another term for       close-hauled  
17    full of pride or conceit; egoistic  
18    filled to capacity  
the cinema was full up     
19    (esp. of a pack of hounds) in hot pursuit of quarry  
20    at the height of activity  
the party was in full swing     
      adv  
21   
a    completely; entirely  
b    (in combination)  
full-grown, full-fledged     
22    exactly; directly; right  
he hit him full in the stomach     
23    very; extremely (esp. in the phrase full well)  
24    full out   with maximum effort or speed  
      n  
25    the greatest degree, extent, etc.  
26      (Brit)   a ridge of sand or shingle along a seashore  
27    in full   without omitting, decreasing, or shortening  
we paid in full for our mistake     
28    to the full   to the greatest extent; thoroughly; fully  
      vb  
29    tr     (Needlework)   to gather or tuck  
30    intr   (of the moon) to be fully illuminated  
     (Old English; related to Old Norse fullr, Old High German foll, Latin plenus, Greek pleres; see fill)  
  fullness     (esp. U.S.)  
  fulness      n  
full   [2]  
      vb   (of cloth, yarn, etc.) to become or to make (cloth, yarn, etc.) heavier and more compact during manufacture through shrinking and beating or pressing  
     (C14: from Old French fouler, ultimately from Latin fullo a fuller1)  
full blood  
      n  
1    an individual, esp. a horse or similar domestic animal, of unmixed race or breed  
2    the relationship between individuals having the same parents  
full-blooded  
      adj  
1    (esp. of horses) of unmixed ancestry; thoroughbred  
2    having great vigour or health; hearty; virile  
  full-bloodedness      n  
full-blown  
      adj  
1    characterized by the fullest, strongest, or best development  
2    in full bloom  
full board  
      n  
a    the provision by a hotel of a bed and all meals  
b    (as modifier)  
full board accommodation     
full-bodied  
      adj   having a full rich flavour or quality  
full-bottomed  
      adj   (of a wig) long at the back  
full-court press  
      n     (Basketball)   the tactic of harrying the opposing team in all areas of the court, as opposed to the more usual practice of trying to defend one's own basket  
full-cream  
      adj   denoting or made with whole unskimmed milk  
full dress  
      n  
a    a formal or ceremonial style of dress, such as white tie and tails for a man and a full-length evening dress for a woman  
b    (as modifier)  
full-dress uniform     
full employment  
      n   a state in which the labour force and other economic resources of a country are utilized to their maximum  
full-faced  
      adj  
1    having a round full face  
2      (Also)    full face   facing towards the viewer, with the entire face visible  
3       another name for       bold face  
  fullface      n, adv  
full-fledged  
      adj      See       fully fledged  
full-frontal  
      adj  
1    Informal   (of a nude person or a photograph of a nude person) exposing the genitals to full view  
2    all-out; unrestrained  
      n  
  full frontal  
3    a full-frontal photograph  
full house  
      n  
1      (Poker)   a hand with three cards of the same value and another pair  
2    a theatre, etc., filled to capacity  
3    (in bingo, etc.) the set of numbers needed to win  
full-length  
      n   modifier  
1    extending to or showing the complete length  
a full-length mirror     
2    of the original length; not abridged  
full monty  
      n  
the  
Informal   something in its entirety  
     (of unknown origin)  
full moon  
      n  
1    one of the four phases of the moon, occurring when the earth lies between the sun and the moon so that the moon is visible as a fully illuminated disc  
2    the moon in this phase  
3    the time at which this occurs  
full-mouthed  
      adj  
1    (of livestock) having a full adult set of teeth  
2    uttered loudly  
a full-mouthed oath     
full nelson  
      n   a wrestling hold, illegal in amateur wrestling, in which a wrestler places both arms under his opponent's arms from behind and exerts pressure with both palms on the back of the neck  
   Compare       half-nelson  
full-on  
      adj  
Informal   complete; unrestrained  
full-on military intervention, full-on hard rock     
full pitch  
      n     (Cricket)      another term for       full toss  
full professor  
      n     (U.S. and Canadian)   a university teacher of the highest academic rank  
full radiator  
      n     (Physics)      another name for       black body  
full-rigged  
      adj   (of a sailing vessel) having three or more masts rigged square  
full sail  
      adv  
1    at top speed  
      adj   postpositive  
      adv  
2    with all sails set  
  full-sailed      adj  
full-scale  
      n   modifier  
1    (of a plan, etc.) of actual size; having the same dimensions as the original  
2    done with thoroughness or urgency; using all resources; all-out  
full score  
      n   the entire score of a musical composition, showing each part separately  
full stop   , full point  
      n   the punctuation mark (<dot>) used at the end of a sentence that is not a question or exclamation, after abbreviations, etc.,   (Also called (esp. U.S. and Canadian))    period  
full time  
      n   the end of a football or other match  
   Compare       half-time  
full-time  
      adj  
1    for the entire time appropriate to an activity  
a full-time job, a full-time student     
      adv  
  full time  
2    on a full-time basis  
he works full time        (Compare)        part-time  
  full-timer      n  
full toss   , full pitch  
      n     (Cricket)   a bowled ball that reaches the batsman without bouncing  
full-wave rectifier  
      n   an electronic circuit in which both half-cycles of incoming alternating current furnish the direct current output  

English Collins Dictionary - English Definition & Thesaurus  

Collins

full

  
1    brimful, brimming, bursting at the seams, complete, entire, filled, gorged, intact, loaded, replete, sated, satiated, satisfied, saturated, stocked, sufficient  
2    abundant, adequate, all-inclusive, ample, broad, comprehensive, copious, detailed, exhaustive, extensive, generous, maximum, plenary, plenteous, plentiful, thorough, unabridged  
3    chock-a-block, chock-full, crammed, crowded, in use, jammed, occupied, packed, taken  
4    clear, deep, distinct, loud, resonant, rich, rounded  
5    baggy, balloon-like, buxom, capacious, curvaceous, large, loose, plump, puffy, rounded, voluminous, voluptuous  
6    in full      completely, in its entirety, in total, in toto, without exception  
7    to the full      completely, entirely, fully, thoroughly, to the utmost, without reservation  
  
Antonyms     
   abridged, blank, devoid, empty, exhausted, faint, incomplete, limited, partial, restricted, thin, tight, vacant, void  


full-blooded     
ballsy     (taboo slang)   gutsy     (slang)   hearty, lusty, mettlesome, red-blooded, vigorous, virile  
full-blown  
1    advanced, complete, developed, entire, full, full-scale, full-sized, fully developed, fully fledged, fully formed, fully grown, progressed, total, whole  
2    blossoming, flowering, full, in full bloom, opened out, unfolded  
  
Antonyms     
  
1    dormant, latent, potential, undeveloped  
full-bodied     
fruity, full-flavoured, heady, heavy, mellow, redolent, rich, strong, well-matured  
full-grown     
adult, developed, full-fledged, grown-up, in one's prime, marriageable, mature, nubile, of age, ripe  
  
Antonyms     
   adolescent, green, premature, undeveloped, unfledged, unformed, unripe, untimely, young  
full-scale     
all-encompassing, all-out, comprehensive, exhaustive, extensive, full-dress, in-depth, major, proper, sweeping, thorough, thoroughgoing, wide-ranging  

English Collins Dictionary - English synonyms & Thesaurus  

Collaborative Dictionary     English Definition
id.
expression used to show full agreement on smth.
v.
A culture of internet only jobs has coined the phrase Wirk. Wirk simply means Internet Work. Internet work is defined by job opportunities that did not exist before the rise of the internet and furthermore the work is likely to be carried out over the internet and payment received for work undertaken via the internet. Wirk describes both full time and part time internet work. Because of the nature of Wirk and the ability for anyone that has internet connection to earn money from Wirk, it is currently more likely to be a part time occupation than full time. Paid Online Questionnaires, Content Writing, Search Marketing are all examples of Wirk.
This is a term rising in popularity
n.
Free On Board: A legal term meaning that when the seller loads merchandise for transportation, he bears full responsibility for it but if the merchandise is later lost or harmed, the buyer suffers the loss.
v.
1. the operation or work of cutting grass and curing it for hay 2. the act of taking full advantage of an easy opportunity

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"Collins English Dictionary 5th Edition first published in 2000 © HarperCollins Publishers 1979, 1986, 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000 and Collins A-Z Thesaurus 1st edition first published in 1995 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995"