find fault (with) definition, find fault (with) meaning | English dictionary

Collins

fault

  

      n  
1    an imperfection; failing or defect; flaw  
2    a mistake or error  
3    an offence; misdeed  
4    responsibility for a mistake or misdeed; culpability  
5      (Electronics)   a defect in a circuit, component, or line, such as a short circuit  
6      (Geology)   a fracture in the earth's crust resulting in the relative displacement and loss of continuity of the rocks on either side of it  
7      (Tennis, squash, etc.)   an invalid serve, such as one that lands outside a prescribed area  
8    (in showjumping) a penalty mark given for failing to clear or refusing a fence, exceeding a time limit, etc.  
9      (Hunting)   an instance of the hounds losing the scent  
10    deficiency; lack; want  
11    at fault  
a    guilty of error; culpable  
b    perplexed  
c    (of hounds) having temporarily lost the scent  
12    find fault (with)          to seek out minor imperfections or errors (in); carp (at)  
13    to a fault   excessively  
      vb  
14      (Geology)   to undergo or cause to undergo a fault  
15    tr   to find a fault in, criticize, or blame  
16    intr   to commit a fault  
     (C13: from Old French faute, from Vulgar Latin fallita (unattested), ultimately from Latin fallere to fail)  
English Collins Dictionary - English Definition & Thesaurus  
Collins
find  
      vb   , finds, finding, found   mainly tr  
1    to meet with or discover by chance  
2    to discover or obtain, esp. by search or effort  
to find happiness     
3    may take a clause as object   to become aware of; realize  
he found that nobody knew     
4    may take a clause as object   to regard as being; consider  
I find this wine a little sour     
5    to look for and point out (something to be criticized)  
to find fault     
6    also intr     (Law)   to determine an issue after judicial inquiry and pronounce a verdict (upon)  
the court found the accused guilty     
7    to regain (something lost or not functioning)  
to find one's tongue     
8    to reach (a target)  
the bullet found its mark     
9    to provide, esp. with difficulty  
we'll find room for you too     
10    to be able to pay  
I can't find that amount of money     
11    find oneself   to realize and accept one's real character; discover one's true vocation  
12    find one's feet   to become capable or confident, as in a new job  
      n  
13    a person, thing, etc., that is found, esp. a valuable or fortunate discovery  
     (Old English findan; related to Old Norse finna, Gothic finthan, Old High German fintan to find)  
  findable      adj  


find out  
      vb   adv  
1    to gain knowledge of (something); learn  
he found out what he wanted     
2    to detect the crime, deception, etc., of (someone)  
find the lady  
      n      another name for       three-card trick  

English Collins Dictionary - English Definition & Thesaurus  

Collins

find

  

      vb  
1    catch sight of, chance upon, come across, come up with, descry, discover, encounter, espy, expose, ferret out, hit upon, lay one's hand on, light upon, locate, meet, recognize, run to earth, run to ground, spot, stumble upon, track down, turn up, uncover, unearth  
2    achieve, acquire, attain, earn, gain, get, obtain, procure, win  
3    get back, recover, regain, repossess, retrieve  
4    arrive at, ascertain, become aware, detect, discover, experience, learn, note, notice, observe, perceive, realise, remark  
5    be responsible for, bring, contribute, cough up     (informal)   furnish, provide, purvey, supply  
      n  
6    acquisition, asset, bargain, catch, discovery, good buy  
  
Antonyms     
  
1    lose, mislay, misplace, miss, overlook  


find out  
1    detect, discover, learn, note, observe, perceive, realize  
2    bring to light, catch, detect, disclose, expose, reveal, rumble     (Brit. informal)   suss (out)     (slang)   uncover, unmask  

English Collins Dictionary - English synonyms & Thesaurus  

Collaborative Dictionary     English Definition
exp.
get well with someone from the very beginning of the relationship
used when referring to romantic relationship, but also in a larger meaning: He hit it off with his teacher; he will continue taking classes with her.
n.
Materialistic concept neonewtonist. In its measures, this variation of length of traveled route (by unit of time) by a group of photons ( φ is the initial of photons) - the light signal - is equal to what is collectively called " radial velocity". It distinguishes itself from it in its gnoseology.
Phys. Concept before 2007 The redshift indicates the phi-speed of a star. But do not give the immediate knowledge of its absolute speed.
n.
avoir le temps de (faire)
n.
scallion (synonym)
exp.
(metaphorically) die
[Fig.]
n.
small handbag without handles
num.
casser en (morceaux, deux)
n.
bitch (alternative term)
nm.
acronym of Lunar Module, little vehicle created especially to move on the moon during XXth century 's space conquest.
exp.
(metaphorically) manipulation attempt
His speech was nothing but smoke and mirrors
n.
be silent, stop talking etc
n.
buttocks of (adult) woman
Slang; refers to a person's "bottom," in American English. A bit more polite than "ass," less clinical than "buttocks."
n.
un bon temps (sport)
v.
to say, pronounce, speak
ex.: The child sounded out each word out loud as she read her book.
exp.
expression used for saying that someone is worth being kept close (as a friend, partner..)
n.
boire quelque chose dans (une tasse)
n.
cell mate (in a prison)
[Slang]
adj.
(of sound) hollow and deep-sounding
adj.
tending to repair (also reparatory)
n.
piegamento in avanti (in piedi)
n.
v.
perceive (an idea or situation) mentally
"I just realised how important is that trip for you."
exp.
(colloquially) tattoo on the lower back
n.
endearment phrase used for someone we find sweet
[Fam.] syn.: sweetie, pumpkin, cutie, cutesy pie
adj.
who cannot find a partner, a date
[Fam.]
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"Collins English Dictionary 5th Edition first published in 2000 © HarperCollins Publishers 1979, 1986, 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000 and Collins A-Z Thesaurus 1st edition first published in 1995 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995"
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