caution money meaning, caution money definition | English Cobuild dictionary

Collins

caution money

  

      n     (Chiefly Brit)   a sum of money deposited as security for good conduct, against possible debts, etc.  
English Collins Dictionary - English Definition & Thesaurus  
Collins
caution  
      n  
1    care, forethought, or prudence, esp. in the face of danger; wariness  
2    something intended or serving as a warning; admonition  
3      (Law)     (chiefly Brit)   a formal warning given to a person suspected or accused of an offence that his words will be taken down and may be used in evidence  
4    a notice entered on the register of title to land that prevents a proprietor from disposing of his land without a notice to the person who entered the caution  
5    Informal   an amusing or surprising person or thing  
she's a real caution     
      vb  
6    tr   to urge or warn (a person) to be careful  
7    tr     (Law)     (chiefly Brit)   to give a caution to (a person)  
8    intr   to warn, urge, or advise  
he cautioned against optimism     
     (C13: from Old French, from Latin cautio, from cavere to beware)  
  cautioner      n  


caution money  
      n     (Chiefly Brit)   a sum of money deposited as security for good conduct, against possible debts, etc.  

English Collins Dictionary - English Definition & Thesaurus  

Collins

caution

  

      n  
1    alertness, belt and braces, care, carefulness, circumspection, deliberation, discretion, forethought, heed, heedfulness, prudence, vigilance, watchfulness  
2    admonition, advice, counsel, injunction, warning  
      vb  
3    admonish, advise, tip off, urge, warn  
  
Antonyms     
,       n   carelessness, daring, imprudence, rashness, recklessness  
      vb   dare  

English Collins Dictionary - English synonyms & Thesaurus  

Collaborative Dictionary     English Definition
exp.
easily gained money
o.
eMoney is electronic money exchangeable electronically for good and services via cyber digital device.
[Tech.] eMoney is electronic money exchangeable electronically via cyber digital device as cell phone
n.
eMoney is electronic money exchangeable electronically via cyber digital device.
[Tech.] eMoney is electronic money exchangeable electronically via cyber digital device as cell phone
v.
used for saying that you think someone is spending too much money on things they do not need
v.
be exactly right
[Fam.] Ex.: Her guess was right on the money.
v.
A culture of internet only jobs has coined the phrase Wirk. Wirk simply means Internet Work. Internet work is defined by job opportunities that did not exist before the rise of the internet and furthermore the work is likely to be carried out over the internet and payment received for work undertaken via the internet. Wirk describes both full time and part time internet work. Because of the nature of Wirk and the ability for anyone that has internet connection to earn money from Wirk, it is currently more likely to be a part time occupation than full time. Paid Online Questionnaires, Content Writing, Search Marketing are all examples of Wirk.
This is a term rising in popularity
n.
A prostitute who exchanges sexual favors for crack cocaine instead of money.
[Slang]
n.
money paid to someone because they have suffered injury or loss, or because they own has been damaged
[US] She received compensation from the government for the damage caused to her property.
n.
money that is paid because someone suffered from a loss of what they own (such as injury)
When you are responsible for someone's serious injury, I think you should pay compensation to that person.
v.
the secretary of state is required by the police and criminal evidence act to make provision by regulations for recording, in national police records, convictions and cautions for such offences as are required.

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"Collins English Dictionary 5th Edition first published in 2000 © HarperCollins Publishers 1979, 1986, 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000 and Collins A-Z Thesaurus 1st edition first published in 1995 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995"