you are more than welcome, you're more than welcome meani... | English Cobuild dictionary

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more

  

More is often considered to be the comparative form of much and many.     
1       det   You use more to indicate that there is a greater amount of something than before or than average, or than something else. You can use `a little', `a lot', `a bit', `far', and `much' in front of more.  
DET pl-n/n-uncount     (Antonym: less)    More and more people are surviving heart attacks..., He spent more time perfecting his dance moves instead of gym work., ...teaching more children foreign languages other than English...     
      More is also a pronoun., pron  
As the level of work increased from light to heavy, workers ate more..., He had four hundred dollars in his pocket. Billy had more.     
      More is also a quantifier., quant   QUANT of def-n  
Employees may face increasing pressure to take on more of their own medical costs in retirement...     
2       prep-phrase   You use more than before a number or amount to say that the actual number or amount is even greater.  
PREP amount   (=over)  
The Afghan authorities say the airport had been closed for more than a year., ...classy leather and silk jackets at more than £250.     
3       adv   You use more to indicate that something or someone has a greater amount of a quality than they used to or than is average or usual.  
ADV adj/adv     (Antonym: less)    Prison conditions have become more brutal..., We can satisfy our basic wants more easily than in the past.     
4       adv   If you say that something is more one thing than another, you mean that it is like the first thing rather than the second.  
ADV group than group/cl, ADV of a n     (Antonym: less)    The exhibition at Boston's Museum of Fine Arts is more a production than it is a museum display..., He's more like a film star than a life-guard, really..., She looked more sad than in pain..., Sue screamed, not loudly, more in surprise than terror..., She's more of a social animal than me.     
5       adv   If you do something more than before or more than someone else, you do it to a greater extent or more often.  
ADV with v     (Antonym: less)    When we are tired, tense, depressed or unwell, we feel pain much more..., What impressed me more was that she knew Tennessee Williams.     
6       adv   You can use more to indicate that something continues to happen for a further period of time.  
ADV after v  
Things might have been different if I'd talked a bit more.      You can use some more to indicate that something continues to happen for a further period of time.  
some more      phrase   PHR after v  
We walked some more.     
7       adv   You use more to indicate that something is repeated. For example, if you do something `once more', you do it again once.  
adv ADV, n ADV  
This train would stop twice more in the suburbs before rolling southeast toward Munich..., The breathing exercises should be repeated several times more.     
8       det   You use more to refer to an additional thing or amount. You can use `a little', `a lot', `a bit', `far' and `much' in front of more.  
DET pl-n/n-uncount  
They needed more time to consider whether to hold an inquiry.     
      More is also an adjective., adj   ADJ n  
We stayed in Danville two more days..., Are you sure you wouldn't like some more wine?     
      More is also a pronoun., pron  
Oxfam has appealed to western nations to do more to help the refugees..., `None of them are very nice folks.'<emdash>`Tell me more.'     
9       adv   You use more in conversations when you want to draw someone's attention to something interesting or important that you are about to say.  
ADV adv/adj     (Antonym: less)    Europe's economies have converged in several areas. More interestingly, there has been convergence in economic growth rates..., More seriously for him, there are members who say he is wrong on this issue.     
10    You can use more and more to indicate that something is becoming greater in amount, extent, or degree all the time.  
more and more      phrase   usu PHR with v, PHR group/cl  
Her life was heading more and more where she wanted it to go...     
11    If something is more or less true, it is true in a general way, but is not completely true.  
more or less      phrase   PHR with group/cl, PHR before v     (vagueness)    The Conference is more or less over..., He more or less started the firm...     
12    If something is more than a particular thing, it has greater value or importance than this thing.  
more than      phrase   v-link PHR n  
He's more than a coach, he's a friend.     
13    You use more than to say that something is true to a greater degree than is necessary or than average.  
more than      phrase   PHR n, PHR adj  
Lithuania produces more than enough food to feed itself.     
14    You use no more than or not more than when you want to emphasize how small a number or amount is.  
no more than/not more than      phrase   PHR amount     (emphasis, Antonym: no less than)    He was a kid really, not more than eighteen or nineteen.     
15    If you say that someone or something is nothing more than a particular thing, you are emphasizing that they are only that thing, and nothing more interesting or important.  
nothing more than      phrase   v-link PHR n     (emphasis)    The newly discovered notes are nothing more than Lang's personal journal.     
16    You can use what is more or what's more to introduce an extra piece of information which supports or emphasizes the point you are making.  
what is more      phrase   V inflects, PHR cl     (emphasis)    (=moreover, furthermore)  
You should remember it, and what's more, you should get it right.     
17   
    all the more  
    all  
    any more  
    any  


ever more      , evermore  
Ever more means for all the time in the future.      adv   ADV with v, oft for ADV  
They will bitterly regret what they have done for ever more..., The editor's decision is final and shall evermore remain so.     
Translation English - Cobuild Collins Dictionary  
Collaborative Dictionary     English Cobuild
id.
def.: if you are too confident about yourself, something bad will happen to show you that you are not as good as you think you are
exp.
when you are happy, people will want to be around you and share your happiness, but when you are sad, people will avoid you.
exp.
The actual say is: "You can catch more flies with honey than with vinegar" This means that it is easier to persuade people if you use polite arguments and flattery than if you are confrontational.
exp.
if you can't be arsed to do something, you can't be bothered to do it (you are too lazy to do it)
colloquial, British, very common
exp.
an expression used to when you are about to cry
[Slang] Ex. : oh my creys!
id.
At a point where you know you have to make a decision that not only effects your life, not only the life of the objects you love but the ones that you consider as well. More than one crux will certainly cause an individual to have a dilemma or two.
n.
(in neomarxist thought) the second main exploitive social class: The bourgeoisie of formation. The members of the formoisie have human capital, receive high wages (the most frequently thanks to their diplomas) and consume more than the world GDP. (neologism 1993 Yanick Toutain)
[Hum. Sc.] The formoisie is the social class that created social-democracy and stalinism.
n.
(in neomarxist thought) the third main exploitive social class: The bourgeoisie of innovation. The members of the innovoisie have usually human innovating capital. They receive (as individuals) copyrights or patent rights and consume more than the world GDP. (neologism 1996 Yanick Toutain)
adj.
having a single dominating theme; esp : having a theme continuing through more than one movement of a musical composition
n.
an ambitious woman who thinks her career really matters more than many things and is not willing to compromise on it
id.
the carrot is more effective than the stick
n.
very imposing or impressive
[Bus.];
adv.
maximum; no more (or later) than; at the most
E.g.: You have to be back at 11 o'clock tops; The show lasted one hour tops
adj.
a person with more power or authority than others
Eg.: Your father is one of the dominant man in his section because he is boss.
exp.
to become more serious
v.
A culture of internet only jobs has coined the phrase Wirk. Wirk simply means Internet Work. Internet work is defined by job opportunities that did not exist before the rise of the internet and furthermore the work is likely to be carried out over the internet and payment received for work undertaken via the internet. Wirk describes both full time and part time internet work. Because of the nature of Wirk and the ability for anyone that has internet connection to earn money from Wirk, it is currently more likely to be a part time occupation than full time. Paid Online Questionnaires, Content Writing, Search Marketing are all examples of Wirk.
This is a term rising in popularity
exp.
love you loads
"je t'aime beaucoup" in French
exp.
what about you
Slang; written abbreviation
exp.
go away idiot, fool ; leave me alone idiot, fool ; fuck you idiot, fool ; fuck off idiot, fool.
[Slang];[Vulg.]
exp.
you only live once
[Fam.] acronym
o.
talk to you later
n.
person that you date
exp.
it's said when someone has done things in the wrong order
adj.
done because you want to
[US] i did the proyect voluntary to improve my grade
adj.
the decision is yours
id.
expression used to show full agreement on smth.
adj.
undesirable, at much lower standards than expected
synonym for "shitty"
q.
This expression means it is better to let one's emotions out, rather than bottled up inside. It is also often said when someone has gas.
this is just something my grandmother would say in cajun french

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"Collins Cobuild English Dictionary for Advanced Learners 4th edition published in 2003 © HarperCollins Publishers 1987, 1995, 2001, 2003 and Collins A-Z Thesaurus 1st edition first published in 1995 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995"
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