yea or nay meaning, yea or nay definition | English Cobuild dictionary

Collins

yea

  
1       convention   Yea is an old-fashioned, poetic, or religious word for `yes'.  
2       convention   Yea is sometimes used to mean `yes' when people are talking about voting for or agreeing to do something.  
The House of Commons can merely say yea or nay to the executive judgment.     
Translation English Cobuild Collins Dictionary  
See also:

year, yeah, ye, yearn

Collaborative Dictionary     English Cobuild
n.
a potential benefit or disadvantage
n.
Arotten apple is a member of a group, or a single element in a set of things, that is bad and likely to corrupt the other people or things in the group
Allusion to the expression "One bad apple spoils the barrel"
conj.
or rather...
v.
explain or bring up
adj.
without nationality or nations
the chambers dictionnary 10th edition.
adj.
rigorously strict or just
Ex.: The judge took the maliciousness of the crime into account and decided upon a rhadamanthine punishment.
n.
very imposing or impressive
[Bus.];
adj.
suitable in quantity or quality
n.
any distracting or deceptive maneuver
exp.
it sounds interesting or attractive
n.
Materialistic concept neonewtonist. In its measures, this variation of length of traveled route (by unit of time) by a group of photons ( φ is the initial of photons) - the light signal - is equal to what is collectively called " radial velocity". It distinguishes itself from it in its gnoseology.
Phys. Concept before 2007 The redshift indicates the phi-speed of a star. But do not give the immediate knowledge of its absolute speed.
v.
to visit unexpectedly or inconventiently
the whole family descended on us for the weekend
exp.
amongst other things said or stated
At the panel she stated her claims inter-alia
n.
characteristic of awesome people or things
id.
use your common sense or resourcefulness
n.
person or tool who creates or translates subtitles
[Fam.]
n.
the greater number or part of something
"the majority of" can only refer to a number of things or people. When talking about an amount, "most of" should be used. Ex.: Most of (not the majority of) the harvest was saved.
n.
a leader in a race or competition
n.
valuable virtual or digital assets in cyberspace
[Tech.]
exp.
home is the best place to be no matter where it is
n.
the most important or central part of something
[US] The core of the book focuses on the period between 1660 and 1857.
n.
name given to isolated or fictive places;
v.
perceive (an idea or situation) mentally
"I just realised how important is that trip for you."
exp.
get drunk or take drugs; get high
exp.
little or no possibility of something to happen
o.
A designate space or part space in cyberspace
[Tech.];[Leg.] designate space in cyberspace
n.
last days, hours or minutes of life
Medical term
n.
a model or example that shows how something works
I like to read books that are a paradigm of human life because I can learn from them.
exp.
yell at someone; attack someone verbally or physically
[Slang];[UK]
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"Collins Cobuild English Dictionary for Advanced Learners 4th edition published in 2003 © HarperCollins Publishers 1987, 1995, 2001, 2003 and Collins A-Z Thesaurus 1st edition first published in 1995 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995"
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