take the law into your own hands meaning, take the law in... | English Cobuild dictionary

Collins

law

  
  ( laws    plural  )
1       n-sing   The law is a system of rules that a society or government develops in order to deal with crime, business agreements, and social relationships. You can also use the law to refer to the people who work in this system.  
the N  
Obscene and threatening phone calls are against the law..., They are seeking permission to begin criminal proceedings against him for breaking the law on financing political parties..., There must be changes in the law quickly to stop this sort of thing ever happening to anyone else..., The book analyses why women kill and how the law treats them.     
2       n-uncount   Law is used to refer to a particular branch of the law, such as criminal law or company law.  
usu adj N  
He was a professor of criminal law at Harvard University law school..., Important questions of constitutional law were involved.     
3       n-count   A law is one of the rules in a system of law which deals with a particular type of agreement, relationship, or crime.  
oft n N  
...the country's liberal political asylum law..., The law was passed on a second vote.     
4       n-plural   Thelawsof an organization or activity are its rules, which are used to organize and control it.  
the N of n, supp N   (=rule)  
...the laws of the Church of England..., Match officials should not tolerate such behaviour but instead enforce the laws of the game.     
5       n-count   A law is a rule or set of rules for good behaviour which is considered right and important by the majority of people for moral, religious, or emotional reasons.   (=code)  
...inflexible moral laws.     
6       n-count   A law is a natural process in which a particular event or thing always leads to a particular result.  
with supp  
The laws of nature are absolute.     
7       n-count   A law is a scientific rule that someone has invented to explain a particular natural process.  
with supp  
...the law of gravity.     
8       n-uncount   Law or the law is all the professions which deal with advising people about the law, representing people in court, or giving decisions and punishments.  
A career in law is becoming increasingly attractive to young people..., Nearly 100 law firms are being referred to the Solicitors' Disciplinary Tribunal.     
9       n-uncount   Law is the study of systems of law and how laws work.  
He came to Oxford and studied law..., He holds a law degree from Bristol University.     
10   
    court of law  
    rule of law  
11    If you accuse someone of thinking they are above the law, you criticize them for thinking that they are so clever or important that they do not need to obey the law.  
above the law      phrase   v-link PHR     (disapproval)    One opposition member of parliament accuses the government of wanting to be above the law...     
12    The law of averages is the idea that something is sure to happen at some time, because of the number of times it generally happens or is expected to happen.  
the law of averages      phrase  
On the law of averages we just can't go on losing.     
13    If you have to do something by law or if you are not allowed to do something by law, the law states that you have to do it or that you are not allowed to do it.  
by law      phrase   PHR with cl  
By law all restaurants must display their prices outside...     
14    If you say that someone lays down the law, you are critical of them because they give other people orders and they think that they are always right.  
lay down the law      phrase   V inflects     (disapproval)    ...traditional parents, who believed in laying down the law for their offspring.     
15    If someone takes the law into their own hands, they punish someone or do something to put a situation right, instead of waiting for the police or the legal system to take action.  
take the law into your own hands             phrase   V inflects  
The speeding motorist was pinned to the ground by angry locals who took the law into their own hands until police arrived.     
16    If you say that someone is a law unto himself or herself, you mean that they behave in an independent way, ignoring laws, rules, or conventional ways of doing things.  
a law unto yourself      phrase   v-link PHR  
Some of the landowners were a law unto themselves. There was nobody to check their excesses and they exploited the people.     
17   
    Sod's law  
    sod  
Translation English - Cobuild Collins Dictionary  
Collins
take   [1]     ( takes    3rd person present)   ( taking    present participle)   ( took    past tense)   ( taken    past participle  )   (USED WITH NOUNS DESCRIBING ACTIONS)  
Take is used in combination with a wide range of nouns, where the meaning of the combination is mostly given by the noun. Many of these combinations are common idiomatic expressions whose meanings can be found at the appropriate nouns. For example, the expression take care is explained at care.     
1       verb   You can use take followed by a noun to talk about an action or event, when it would also be possible to use the verb that is related to that noun. For example, you can say `she took a shower' instead of `she showered'.  
Betty took a photograph of us...      V n  
I've never taken a holiday since starting this job...      V n  
There's not enough people willing to take the risk...      V n  
2       verb   In ordinary spoken or written English, people use take with a range of nouns instead of using a more specific verb. For example people often say `he took control' or `she took a positive attitude' instead of `he assumed control' or `she adopted a positive attitude'.  
The Patriotic Front took power after a three-month civil war...      V n  
I felt it was important for women to join and take a leading role...      V n  

Translation English - Cobuild Collins Dictionary  

Collins

take

  

      vb  
1    abduct, acquire, arrest, capture, carry off, cart off     (slang)   catch, clutch, ensnare, entrap, gain possession of, get, get hold of, grasp, grip, have, help oneself to, lay hold of, obtain, receive, secure, seize, win  
2    abstract, appropriate, blag     (slang)   cabbage     (Brit. slang)   carry off, filch, misappropriate, nick     (slang, chiefly Brit.)   pinch     (informal)   pocket, purloin, run off with, steal, swipe     (slang)   walk off with  
3    book, buy, engage, hire, lease, pay for, pick, purchase, rent, reserve, select  
4    abide, bear, brave, brook, endure, go through, hack     (slang)   pocket, put up with     (informal)   stand, stomach, submit to, suffer, swallow, thole     (Scot.)   tolerate, undergo, weather, withstand  
5    consume, drink, eat, imbibe, ingest, inhale, swallow  
6    accept, adopt, assume, enter upon, undertake  
7    do, effect, execute, have, make, perform  
8    assume, believe, consider, deem, hold, interpret as, perceive, presume, receive, regard, see as, think of as, understand  
9    be efficacious, do the trick     (informal)   have effect, operate, succeed, work  
10    bear, bring, carry, cart, convey, ferry, fetch, haul, tote     (informal)   transport  
11    accompany, bring, conduct, convoy, escort, guide, hold (someone's) hand, lead, usher  
12    attract, become popular, captivate, charm, delight, enchant, fascinate, please, win favour  
13    call for, demand, necessitate, need, require  
14    deduct, eliminate, remove, subtract  
15    accept, accommodate, contain, have room for, hold  
16      (slang)   bilk, cheat, con     (informal)   deceive, defraud, do     (slang)   dupe, fiddle     (informal)   gull     (archaic)   pull a fast one on     (informal)   stiff     (slang)   swindle  
      n  
17    catch, gate, haul, proceeds, profits, receipts, return, revenue, takings, yield  
  
Antonyms     
  
1    free, let go, release  
2    give, give back, hand over, restore, return, surrender, yield  
4    avoid, dodge, give in, give way  
6    decline, dismiss, eschew, ignore, refuse, reject, scorn, spurn  
9    fail, flop     (informal)  
10    send  
14    add, put  


take aback     
astonish, astound, bewilder, disconcert, flabbergast     (informal)   floor     (informal)   nonplus, stagger, startle, stun, surprise  
take back  
1    disavow, disclaim, recant, renege, renounce, retract, unsay, withdraw  
2    get back, recapture, reclaim, reconquer, regain, repossess, retake  
3    accept back, exchange, give one a refund for  
take down  
1    make a note of, minute, note, put on record, record, set down, transcribe, write down  
2    depress, drop, haul down, let down, lower, pull down, remove, take off  
3    demolish, disassemble, dismantle, level, raze, take apart, take to pieces, tear down  
4    deflate, humble, humiliate, mortify, put down     (slang)  
take in  
1    absorb, assimilate, comprehend, digest, get the hang of     (informal)   grasp, understand  
2    comprise, contain, cover, embrace, encompass, include  
3    accommodate, admit, let in, receive  
4      (informal)   bilk, cheat, con     (informal)   cozen, deceive, do     (slang)   dupe, fool, gull     (archaic)   hoodwink, mislead, pull the wool over (someone's) eyes     (informal)   stiff     (slang)   swindle, trick  
take off  
1    discard, divest oneself of, doff, drop, peel off, remove, strip off  
2    become airborne, leave the ground, lift off, take to the air  
3      (informal)   abscond, beat it     (slang)   decamp, depart, disappear, go, hit the road     (slang)   hook it     (slang)   leave, pack one's bags     (informal)   set out, slope off, split     (slang)   strike out  
4      (informal)   caricature, hit off, imitate, lampoon, mimic, mock, parody, satirize, send up     (Brit. informal)   spoof     (informal)   take the piss (out of)     (taboo slang)   travesty  
take on  
1    employ, engage, enlist, enrol, hire, retain  
2    acquire, assume, come to have  
3    accept, address oneself to, agree to do, have a go at     (informal)   tackle, undertake  
4    compete against, contend with, enter the lists against, face, fight, match oneself against, oppose, pit oneself against, vie with  
5      (informal)   break down, get excited, get upset, give way, make a fuss  
take over     
assume control of, become leader of, come to power, gain control of, succeed to, take command of  
take to  
1    flee to, head for, make for, man, run for  
2    become friendly, be pleased by, be taken with, conceive an affection for, get on with, like, warm to  
3    have recourse to, make a habit of, resort to  
take up  
1    adopt, assume, become involved in, engage in, start  
2    begin again, carry on, continue, follow on, go on, pick up, proceed, recommence, restart, resume  
3    absorb, consume, cover, extend over, fill, occupy, use up  

English Collins Dictionary - English synonyms & Thesaurus  

Collaborative Dictionary     English Cobuild
exp.
go for something, take one's chances
exp.
go out in the street to protest
exp.
sleep for a short period of time, have a light sleep
exp.
meet someone by chance
E.g.I ran into James the other day when I was shopping (meaning=I met James without planning it, by chance)
exp.
I can't understand it, I can't believe it, I can't accept it
exp.
to take OR bring somebody down a notch means to make them behave less arrogantly or proudly.
exp.
to take OR turn OR bring something down a notch means to decrease its intensity
exp.
expression used to describe the practice of a company using internally the marketed products
[Bus.] expression originating from and widely used in software industry; the practice is also known as "dogfooding"
exp.
sauve ton coeur
No idea what this means MJB
exp.
it's said for determining someone to calm down, be patient, control his/her reactions
id.
use your common sense or resourcefulness
exp.
(about a positive event/situation) happen out of the blue, without any effort from the impacted persons
n.
[child] to be sent to a care organization run by the social services, or to be looked after by foster parents
exp.
do something which puts you in a very difficult situation and limits the way that you can act
n.
to support your family
exp.
expression used for catching the attention of an audience
exp.
calm down!
exp.
absolutely not; not in this lifetime
Slang expression used mostly in 19th century
exp.
get drunk or take drugs; get high
exp.
take credit for another person's accomplishment
adj.
brought into servitude; slave to someone
exp.
expression used when referring to something that is unlikely to happen soon (not in the time interval that one can resist holding his breath)
E.g.: "Will the economy recover any soon?" - "Don't hold your breath."
exp.
your best clothes that you wear on special occasions
exp.
expression used to encourage someone to share with you what's on his mind
n.
new trend in computing to take into account the environmental aspect when designing IT systems.
exp.
do not take into account, disregard, ignore on purpose, avoid, dismiss
E.g: His boss asked him for a report, but he gave it the go-by.
n.
belle-soeur
exp.
= get your knickers in a twist/knot
US English, colloquial

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"Collins Cobuild English Dictionary for Advanced Learners 4th edition published in 2003 © HarperCollins Publishers 1987, 1995, 2001, 2003 and Collins A-Z Thesaurus 1st edition first published in 1995 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995"
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