take someone for granted meaning, take someone for granted definition | English Cobuild dictionary

Collins

grant

  
  ( grants    plural & 3rd person present)   ( granting    present participle)   ( granted    past tense & past participle  )
1       n-count   A grant is an amount of money that a government or other institution gives to an individual or to an organization for a particular purpose such as education or home improvements.  
They'd got a special grant to encourage research..., Unfortunately, my application for a grant was rejected.     
2       verb   If someone in authority grants you something, or if something is grantedto you, you are allowed to have it.  
FORMAL  
(=give)  

France has agreed to grant him political asylum...      V n n  
It was a Labour government which granted independence to India and Pakistan...      V n to n  
Permission was granted a few weeks ago.      be V-ed  
3       verb   If you grantthat something is true, you accept that it is true, even though your opinion about it does not change.  
The magistrates granted that the charity was justified in bringing the action.      V that   You use `I grant you' or `I'll grant you' to say that you accept something is true, even though your opinion about it does not change.  
I grant you/I'll grant you      phrase   oft PHR that  
He took a risk, I'll grant you. But when you think about it, the risk was pretty small...     
4    If you say that someone takes you for granted, you are complaining that they benefit from your help, efforts, or presence without showing that they are grateful.  
take someone for granted             phrase   take inflects  
The officials felt taken for granted and grumbled loudly.     
5    If you take something for granted, you believe that it is true or accept it as normal without thinking about it.  
take something for granted      phrase   take inflects  
I was amazed that virtually all the things I took for granted up north just didn't happen in London.     
6    If you take it for grantedthat something is the case, you believe that it is true or you accept it as normal without thinking about it.  
take it for granted      phrase   take inflects, PHR that  
He seemed to take it for granted that he should speak as a representative.     
Translation English Cobuild Collins Dictionary  
Collins
take          [1]     ( takes    3rd person present)   ( taking    present participle)   ( took    past tense)   ( taken    past participle  )   (USED WITH NOUNS DESCRIBING ACTIONS)  
Take is used in combination with a wide range of nouns, where the meaning of the combination is mostly given by the noun. Many of these combinations are common idiomatic expressions whose meanings can be found at the appropriate nouns. For example, the expression take care is explained at care.     
1       verb   You can use take    followed by a noun to talk about an action or event, when it would also be possible to use the verb that is related to that noun. For example, you can say `she took a shower' instead of `she showered'.      
Betty took a photograph of us...      V n  
I've never taken a holiday since starting this job...      V n  
There's not enough people willing to take the risk...      V n  
2       verb   In ordinary spoken or written English, people use take    with a range of nouns instead of using a more specific verb. For example people often say `he took control' or `she took a positive attitude' instead of `he assumed control' or `she adopted a positive attitude'.      
The Patriotic Front took power after a three-month civil war...      V n  
I felt it was important for women to join and take a leading role...      V n  

Translation English Cobuild Collins Dictionary  

Collins

take

  

      vb  
1    abduct, acquire, arrest, capture, carry off, cart off     (slang)   catch, clutch, ensnare, entrap, gain possession of, get, get hold of, grasp, grip, have, help oneself to, lay hold of, obtain, receive, secure, seize, win  
2    abstract, appropriate, blag     (slang)   cabbage     (Brit. slang)   carry off, filch, misappropriate, nick     (slang, chiefly Brit.)   pinch     (informal)   pocket, purloin, run off with, steal, swipe     (slang)   walk off with  
3    book, buy, engage, hire, lease, pay for, pick, purchase, rent, reserve, select  
4    abide, bear, brave, brook, endure, go through, hack     (slang)   pocket, put up with     (informal)   stand, stomach, submit to, suffer, swallow, thole     (Scot.)   tolerate, undergo, weather, withstand  
5    consume, drink, eat, imbibe, ingest, inhale, swallow  
6    accept, adopt, assume, enter upon, undertake  
7    do, effect, execute, have, make, perform  
8    assume, believe, consider, deem, hold, interpret as, perceive, presume, receive, regard, see as, think of as, understand  
9    be efficacious, do the trick     (informal)   have effect, operate, succeed, work  
10    bear, bring, carry, cart, convey, ferry, fetch, haul, tote     (informal)   transport  
11    accompany, bring, conduct, convoy, escort, guide, hold (someone's) hand, lead, usher  
12    attract, become popular, captivate, charm, delight, enchant, fascinate, please, win favour  
13    call for, demand, necessitate, need, require  
14    deduct, eliminate, remove, subtract  
15    accept, accommodate, contain, have room for, hold  
16      (slang)   bilk, cheat, con     (informal)   deceive, defraud, do     (slang)   dupe, fiddle     (informal)   gull     (archaic)   pull a fast one on     (informal)   stiff     (slang)   swindle  
      n  
17    catch, gate, haul, proceeds, profits, receipts, return, revenue, takings, yield  
  
Antonyms     
  
1    free, let go, release  
2    give, give back, hand over, restore, return, surrender, yield  
4    avoid, dodge, give in, give way  
6    decline, dismiss, eschew, ignore, refuse, reject, scorn, spurn  
9    fail, flop     (informal)  
10    send  
14    add, put  


take aback     
astonish, astound, bewilder, disconcert, flabbergast     (informal)   floor     (informal)   nonplus, stagger, startle, stun, surprise  
take back  
1    disavow, disclaim, recant, renege, renounce, retract, unsay, withdraw  
2    get back, recapture, reclaim, reconquer, regain, repossess, retake  
3    accept back, exchange, give one a refund for  
take down  
1    make a note of, minute, note, put on record, record, set down, transcribe, write down  
2    depress, drop, haul down, let down, lower, pull down, remove, take off  
3    demolish, disassemble, dismantle, level, raze, take apart, take to pieces, tear down  
4    deflate, humble, humiliate, mortify, put down     (slang)  
take in  
1    absorb, assimilate, comprehend, digest, get the hang of     (informal)   grasp, understand  
2    comprise, contain, cover, embrace, encompass, include  
3    accommodate, admit, let in, receive  
4      (informal)   bilk, cheat, con     (informal)   cozen, deceive, do     (slang)   dupe, fool, gull     (archaic)   hoodwink, mislead, pull the wool over (someone's) eyes     (informal)   stiff     (slang)   swindle, trick  
take off  
1    discard, divest oneself of, doff, drop, peel off, remove, strip off  
2    become airborne, leave the ground, lift off, take to the air  
3      (informal)   abscond, beat it     (slang)   decamp, depart, disappear, go, hit the road     (slang)   hook it     (slang)   leave, pack one's bags     (informal)   set out, slope off, split     (slang)   strike out  
4      (informal)   caricature, hit off, imitate, lampoon, mimic, mock, parody, satirize, send up     (Brit. informal)   spoof     (informal)   take the piss (out of)     (taboo slang)   travesty  
take on  
1    employ, engage, enlist, enrol, hire, retain  
2    acquire, assume, come to have  
3    accept, address oneself to, agree to do, have a go at     (informal)   tackle, undertake  
4    compete against, contend with, enter the lists against, face, fight, match oneself against, oppose, pit oneself against, vie with  
5      (informal)   break down, get excited, get upset, give way, make a fuss  
take over     
assume control of, become leader of, come to power, gain control of, succeed to, take command of  
take to  
1    flee to, head for, make for, man, run for  
2    become friendly, be pleased by, be taken with, conceive an affection for, get on with, like, warm to  
3    have recourse to, make a habit of, resort to  
take up  
1    adopt, assume, become involved in, engage in, start  
2    begin again, carry on, continue, follow on, go on, pick up, proceed, recommence, restart, resume  
3    absorb, consume, cover, extend over, fill, occupy, use up  

English Collins Dictionary - English synonyms & Thesaurus  

Collaborative Dictionary     English Cobuild
exp.
go for something, take one's chances
exp.
to take OR bring somebody down a notch means to make them behave less arrogantly or proudly.
exp.
to take OR turn OR bring something down a notch means to decrease its intensity
exp.
sleep for a short period of time, have a light sleep
exp.
go out in the street to protest
exp.
take credit for another person's accomplishment
exp.
meet someone by chance
E.g.I ran into James the other day when I was shopping (meaning=I met James without planning it, by chance)
n.
when a person kills someone then takes their own life it is referred to as a murder suicide
exp.
I can't understand it, I can't believe it, I can't accept it
exp.
find a a partner for someone and act as an intermediary for the two persons to meet
exp.
kill someone; cause a big damage to someone
exp.
yell at someone; attack someone verbally or physically
[Slang];[UK]
exp.
get seriously involved in a relationship
exp.
get drunk or take drugs; get high
n.
دل را به دریا زدن
exp.
get well with someone from the very beginning of the relationship
used when referring to romantic relationship, but also in a larger meaning: He hit it off with his teacher; he will continue taking classes with her.
n.
ability to make decisions and take action without waiting for someone to tell you what to do
I showed my initiative when I became a group leader in class.
n.
someone who talks too much
[Australia] ; [NZ]
n.
someone who is going through struggles
n.
someone who works as a dishwasher
[Slang]
adj.
brought into servitude; slave to someone
n.
right granted to a general assembly to give an opinion on the salaries and bonuses of top managers
[Bus.]
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"Collins Cobuild English Dictionary for Advanced Learners 4th edition published in 2003 © HarperCollins Publishers 1987, 1995, 2001, 2003 and Collins A-Z Thesaurus 1st edition first published in 1995 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995"
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