speak for yourself meaning, speak for yourself definition | English Cobuild dictionary

Collins

speak

  
  ( speaks    3rd person present)   ( speaking    present participle)   ( spoke    past tense)   ( spoken    past participle  )
1       verb   When you speak, you use your voice in order to say something.  
He tried to speak, but for once, his voice had left him...      V  
I rang the hotel and spoke to Louie...      V to/with n  
She says she must speak with you at once...      V to/with n  
She cried when she spoke of Oliver.      V of/about n  
...as I spoke these idiotic words.      V n  
  spoken      adj   ADJ n  
...a marked decline in the standards of written and spoken English in Britain.     
2       verb   When someone speaksto a group of people, they make a speech.  
When speaking to the seminar Mr Franklin spoke of his experience, gained on a recent visit to Trinidad...      V to n  
He's determined to speak at the Democratic Convention...      V  
The President spoke of the need for territorial compromise.      V of n  
3       verb   If you speak for a group of people, you make their views and demands known, or represent them.  
He said it was the job of the Church to speak for the underprivileged...      V for n  
I speak for all 7,000 members of our organization...      V for n  
4       verb   If you speak a foreign language, you know the language and are able to have a conversation in it.  
He doesn't speak English...      V n  
5       verb   People sometimes mention something that has been written by saying what the author speaks of.  
Throughout the book Liu speaks of the abuse of Party power...      V of n  
St Paul speaks of the body as the `temple of the Holy Spirit'.      V of n as n  
6       v-recip   If two people arenotspeaking, they no longer talk to each other because they have quarrelled.  
with neg  
He is not speaking to his mother because of her friendship with his ex-wife...      V to n  
The co-stars are still not speaking.      pl-n V  
7       verb   If you say that something speaks foritself, you mean that its meaning or quality is so obvious that it does not need explaining or pointing out.  
no cont  
...the figures speak for themselves<endash>low order books, bleak prospects at home and a worsening outlook for exports...      V for pron-refl  
8   
    speaking  
9    If you say `Speak for yourself' when someone has said something, you mean that what they have said is only their opinion or applies only to them.  
INFORMAL  
speak for yourself      convention  
`We're not blaming you,' Kate said. `Speak for yourself,' Boris muttered.     
10    If a person or thing is spoken for or has been spoken for, someone has claimed them or asked for them, so no-one else can have them.  
be spoken for             phrase   V inflects  
She'd probably drop some comment about her `fiancé' into the conversation so that he'd think she was already spoken for...     
11    Nothing to speak of means `hardly anything' or `only unimportant things'.  
to speak of      phrase   n PHR, with brd-neg  
They have no weaponry to speak of..., `Any fresh developments?'<emdash>`Nothing to speak of.'     
12    If you speak well of someone or speak highly of someone, you say good things about them. If you speak ill of someone, you criticize them.  
speak well/highly/ill of sb      phrase   V inflects, PHR n  
Both spoke highly of the Russian president..., It seemed she found it difficult to speak ill of anyone.     
13    You use so to speak to draw attention to the fact that you are describing or referring to something in a way that may be amusing or unusual rather than completely accurate.  
so to speak      phrase   PHR with cl  
I ought not to tell you but I will, since you're in the family, so to speak...     
14    If you are on speaking termswith someone, you are quite friendly with them and often talk to them.  
on speaking terms      phrase   usu v-link PHR, oft PHR with n  
For a long time her mother and her grandmother had hardly been on speaking terms.     
15   
    to speak your mind  
    mind  
    to speak volumes  
    volume   speak out      phrasal verb   If you speak out against something or in favour of something, you say publicly that you think it is bad or good.  
As tempers rose, he spoke out strongly against some of the radical ideas for selling off state-owned property...      V P prep  
Even then, she continued to speak out at rallies around the country.      V P   speak up  
1       phrasal verb   If you speak up, you say something, especially to defend a person or protest about something, rather than just saying nothing.  
Uncle Herbert never argued, never spoke up for himself...      V P for n  
2       phrasal verb   If you ask someone to speak up, you are asking them to speak more loudly.  
no cont  
I'm quite deaf<endash>you'll have to speak up.      V P  
Translation English - Cobuild Collins Dictionary  
Collins
speak     ( speaks    3rd person present)   ( speaking    present participle)   ( spoke    past tense)   ( spoken    past participle  )
1       verb   When you speak, you use your voice in order to say something.  
He tried to speak, but for once, his voice had left him...      V  
I rang the hotel and spoke to Louie...      V to/with n  
She says she must speak with you at once...      V to/with n  
She cried when she spoke of Oliver.      V of/about n  
...as I spoke these idiotic words.      V n  
  spoken      adj   ADJ n  
...a marked decline in the standards of written and spoken English in Britain.     
2       verb   When someone speaksto a group of people, they make a speech.  
When speaking to the seminar Mr Franklin spoke of his experience, gained on a recent visit to Trinidad...      V to n  
He's determined to speak at the Democratic Convention...      V  
The President spoke of the need for territorial compromise.      V of n  
3       verb   If you speak for a group of people, you make their views and demands known, or represent them.  
He said it was the job of the Church to speak for the underprivileged...      V for n  
I speak for all 7,000 members of our organization...      V for n  
4       verb   If you speak a foreign language, you know the language and are able to have a conversation in it.  
He doesn't speak English...      V n  
5       verb   People sometimes mention something that has been written by saying what the author speaks of.  
Throughout the book Liu speaks of the abuse of Party power...      V of n  
St Paul speaks of the body as the `temple of the Holy Spirit'.      V of n as n  
6       v-recip   If two people arenotspeaking, they no longer talk to each other because they have quarrelled.  
with neg  
He is not speaking to his mother because of her friendship with his ex-wife...      V to n  
The co-stars are still not speaking.      pl-n V  
7       verb   If you say that something speaks foritself, you mean that its meaning or quality is so obvious that it does not need explaining or pointing out.  
no cont  
...the figures speak for themselves<endash>low order books, bleak prospects at home and a worsening outlook for exports...      V for pron-refl  
8   
    speaking  
9    If you say `Speak for yourself' when someone has said something, you mean that what they have said is only their opinion or applies only to them.  
INFORMAL  
speak for yourself      convention  
`We're not blaming you,' Kate said. `Speak for yourself,' Boris muttered.     
10    If a person or thing is spoken for or has been spoken for, someone has claimed them or asked for them, so no-one else can have them.  
be spoken for      phrase   V inflects  
She'd probably drop some comment about her `fiancé' into the conversation so that he'd think she was already spoken for...     
11    Nothing to speak of means `hardly anything' or `only unimportant things'.  
to speak of      phrase   n PHR, with brd-neg  
They have no weaponry to speak of..., `Any fresh developments?'<emdash>`Nothing to speak of.'     
12    If you speak well of someone or speak highly of someone, you say good things about them. If you speak ill of someone, you criticize them.  
speak well/highly/ill of sb      phrase   V inflects, PHR n  
Both spoke highly of the Russian president..., It seemed she found it difficult to speak ill of anyone.     
13    You use so to speak to draw attention to the fact that you are describing or referring to something in a way that may be amusing or unusual rather than completely accurate.  
so to speak      phrase   PHR with cl  
I ought not to tell you but I will, since you're in the family, so to speak...     
14    If you are on speaking termswith someone, you are quite friendly with them and often talk to them.  
on speaking terms      phrase   usu v-link PHR, oft PHR with n  
For a long time her mother and her grandmother had hardly been on speaking terms.     
15   
    to speak your mind  
    mind  
    to speak volumes  
    volume   speak out      phrasal verb   If you speak out against something or in favour of something, you say publicly that you think it is bad or good.  
As tempers rose, he spoke out strongly against some of the radical ideas for selling off state-owned property...      V P prep  
Even then, she continued to speak out at rallies around the country.      V P   speak up  
1       phrasal verb   If you speak up, you say something, especially to defend a person or protest about something, rather than just saying nothing.  
Uncle Herbert never argued, never spoke up for himself...      V P for n  
2       phrasal verb   If you ask someone to speak up, you are asking them to speak more loudly.  
no cont  
I'm quite deaf<endash>you'll have to speak up.      V P  


-speak     
-speak is used to form nouns which refer to the kind of language used by a particular person or by people involved in a particular activity. You use -speak when you disapprove of this kind of language because it is difficult for other people to understand.      comb in n-uncount  
  (disapproval)   
Unfortunately, the simplicity of this message is almost lost within his constant management-speak.     

Translation English - Cobuild Collins Dictionary  

Collins

speak

  
1    articulate, communicate, converse, discourse, enunciate, express, make known, pronounce, say, state, talk, tell, utter, voice  
2    address, argue, declaim, deliver an address, descant, discourse, harangue, hold forth, lecture, plead, speechify, spiel     (informal)   spout  
3      (with)       of   advert to, allude to, comment on, deal with, discuss, make reference to, mention, refer to  


speak for     
act for or on behalf of, appear for, hold a brief for, hold a mandate for, represent  
speak out   , up  
1    make oneself heard, say it loud and clear, speak loudly  
2    have one's say, make one's position plain, sound off, speak one's mind, stand up and be counted  
speak to  
1    accost, address, apostrophize, direct one's words at, talk to  
2    admonish, bring to book, dress down     (informal)   lecture, rebuke, reprimand, scold, tell off     (informal)   tick off     (informal)   warn  

English Collins Dictionary - English synonyms & Thesaurus  

Collaborative Dictionary     English Cobuild
v.
to say, pronounce, speak
ex.: The child sounded out each word out loud as she read her book.
id.
def.: if you are too confident about yourself, something bad will happen to show you that you are not as good as you think you are

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"Collins Cobuild English Dictionary for Advanced Learners 4th edition published in 2003 © HarperCollins Publishers 1987, 1995, 2001, 2003 and Collins A-Z Thesaurus 1st edition first published in 1995 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995"