practice manager meaning, practice manager definition | English Cobuild dictionary

Collins

practice

  
  ( practices    plural  )
1       n-count   You can refer to something that people do regularly as a practice.  
Some firms have cut workers' pay below the level set in their contract, a practice that is illegal in Germany..., Gordon Brown has demanded a public inquiry into bank practices.     
2       n-var   Practice means doing something regularly in order to be able to do it better. A practice is one of these periods of doing something.  
usu supp N  
She was taking all three of her daughters to basketball practice every day..., The defending world racing champion recorded the fastest time in a final practice today.     
3       n-uncount   The work done by doctors and lawyers is referred to as the practice of medicine and law. People's religious activities are referred to as the practice of a religion.  
with supp  
...the practice of internal medicine..., I eventually realized I had to change my attitude toward medical practice.     
4       n-count   A doctor's or lawyer's practice is his or her business, often shared with other doctors or lawyers.  
The new doctor's practice was miles away from where I lived...     
5   
    practise  
6    What happens in practice is what actually happens, in contrast to what is supposed to happen.  
in practice      phrase   PHR with cl  
...the difference between foreign policy as presented to the public and foreign policy in actual practice..., In practice, workers do not work to satisfy their needs.     
7    If something such as a procedure is normal practice or standard practice, it is the usual thing that is done in a particular situation.  
normal practice/standard practice      phrase   v-link PHR  
It is normal practice not to reveal details of a patient's condition..., The transcript is full of codewords, which is standard practice in any army.     
8    If you are out of practice at doing something, you have not had much experience of it recently, although you used to do it a lot or be quite good at it.  
out of practice      phrase   v-link PHR  
`How's your German?'<emdash>`Not bad, but I'm out of practice.'     
9    If you put a belief or method into practice, you behave or act in accordance with it.  
put into practice      phrase   V inflects  
Now that he is back, the prime minister has another chance to put his new ideas into practice...     


code of practice        ( codes of practice    plural  ) A code of practice is a set of written rules which explains how people working in a particular profession should behave.      n-count  
The auctioneers are violating a code of practice by dealing in stolen goods.     
general practice        ( general practices    plural  )
1       n-uncount   When a doctor is in general practice, he or she treats sick people at a surgery or office, or visits them at home, and does not specialize in a particular type of medicine.  
In recent years, doctors have been trained specifically for general practice.     
      General practice is also a noun., n-count  
The sample was selected from the medical records of two general practices.     
2       n-uncount   When lawyers deal with all kinds of legal matters, rather than specializing in one kind of law, you can say they have a general practice or are in general practice.  
  (mainly AM)  
restrictive practice        ( restrictive practices    plural  ) Restrictive practices are ways in which people involved in an industry, trade, or profession protect their own interests, rather than having a system which is fair to the public, employers, and other workers.  
  (BRIT, BUSINESS)      n-count   usu pl  
The Act was introduced to end restrictive practices in the docks.     
sharp practice     
You can use sharp practice to refer to an action or a way of behaving, especially in business or professional matters, that you think is clever but dishonest.      n-uncount  
  (disapproval)   
He accused some solicitors of sharp practice.     
teaching practice     
Teaching practice is a period that a student teacher spends teaching at a school as part of his or her training.  
  (mainly BRIT)      n-uncount  
in AM, usually use practice teaching     
Translation English - Cobuild Collins Dictionary  
Collaborative Dictionary     English Cobuild
v.
to practice something excessively, to train too much
n.
The practice of restricting the amount of food a person eats (self-imposed starvation seen with anorexia nervosa) in order to consume greater amounts of alcohol or of purging (as seen with bulimia nervosa) to try to reduce caloric intake to offset the calories consumed in alcohol.
[Med.] "Drunkorexic" behaviors most often stem from the fear of weight gain from alcohol.
exp.
expression used to describe the practice of a company using internally the marketed products
[Bus.] expression originating from and widely used in software industry; the practice is also known as "dogfooding"
n.
a portmanteau of 'employer' and 'voyeurism'. signifies the act of searching for an employer or the practice of an employer when looking to fill positions. The term places an emphasis on the secretive connotation of the word 'voyeur', denoting a clandestine and thus superior form of employment search
[Tech.] Ex.: Employerism is what one must engage in, if one wishes to embark upon a more productive job hunt!
n.
A specific technical worksheet tool with performer's requirements. Excellent start of negotiations between performers, managers and contractors. (These requirements might include sound and light conditions for the show, food lodging and transportation of artistic talents)
n.
right granted to a general assembly to give an opinion on the salaries and bonuses of top managers
[Bus.]

head

Reverso Community

  • Create your own vocabulary list
  • Contribute to the Collaborative Dictionary
  • Improve and share your linguistic knowledge
Advertising
"Collins Cobuild English Dictionary for Advanced Learners 4th edition published in 2003 © HarperCollins Publishers 1987, 1995, 2001, 2003 and Collins A-Z Thesaurus 1st edition first published in 1995 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995"