not only but also meaning, not only but also definition | English Cobuild dictionary

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only

  

In written English, only is usually placed immediately before the word it qualifies. In spoken English, however, you can use stress to indicate what only qualifies, so its position is not so important.     
1       adv   You use only to indicate the one thing that is true, appropriate, or necessary in a particular situation, in contrast to all the other things that are not true, appropriate, or necessary.  
ADV with group, ADV before v  
Only the President could authorize the use of the atomic bomb..., Only here were the police visible in any strength at all..., 44-year-old woman seeks caring, honest male of similar age for friendship and fun. Genuine replies only..., A business can only be built and expanded on a sound financial base...     
2       adv   You use only to introduce the thing which must happen before the thing mentioned in the main part of the sentence can happen.  
ADV cl/prep  
The lawyer is paid only if he wins..., The Bank of England insists that it will cut interest rates only when it is ready...     
3       adj   If you talk about theonly person or thing involved in a particular situation, you mean there are no others involved in it.  
det ADJ  
She was the only woman in Shell's legal department..., My cat Gustaf was the only thing I had - the only company.     
4       adj   An only child is a child who has no brothers or sisters.  
ADJ n  
5       adv   You use only to indicate that something is no more important, interesting, or difficult, for example, than you say it is, especially when you want to correct a wrong idea that someone may get or has already got.  
ADV group, ADV before v   (=just)  
At the moment it is only a theory..., `I'm only a sergeant,' said Clements..., Don't get defensive, Charlie. I was only joking.     
6       adv   You use only to emphasize how small an amount is or how short a length of time is.  
ADV n/adv     (emphasis)    Child car seats only cost about £10 a week to hire., ...spacecraft guidance systems weighing only a few grams..., I've only recently met him.     
7       adv   You use only to emphasize that you are talking about a small part of an amount or group, not the whole of it.  
ADV n     (emphasis)    These are only a few of the possibilities..., Only a minority of the people supported the Revolution.     
8       adv   Only is used after `can' or `could' to emphasize that it is impossible to do anything except the rather inadequate or limited action that is mentioned.  
modal ADV inf     (emphasis)    For a moment I could say nothing. I could only stand and look..., The police can only guess at the scale of the problem.     
9       adv   You can use only in the expressions I only wish or I only hope in order to emphasize what you are hoping or wishing.  
ADV before v     (emphasis)    (=just)  
I only wish he were here now that things are getting better for me...     
10       conj   Only can be used to add a comment which slightly changes or limits what you have just said.  
INFORMAL  
(=but, except)  

It's just as dramatic as a film, only it's real..., Drop in and see me when you're ready. Only don't take too long about it.     
11       conj   Only can be used after a clause with `would' to indicate why something is not done.  
SPOKEN  
(=but)  

I'd invite you to come with me, only it's such a long way..., I'd be quite happy to go. Only I don't know what my kids would say about living there.     
12       adv   You can use only before an infinitive to introduce an event which happens immediately after one you have just mentioned, and which is rather surprising or unfortunate.  
ADV to-inf  
Ryle tried the Embassy, only to be told that Hugh was in a meeting..., He raced through the living room, only to find the front door closed.     
13       adv   You can use only to emphasize how appropriate a certain course of action or type of behaviour is.  
usu ADV adj, also ADV to-inf     (emphasis)    It's only fair to let her know that you intend to apply..., She appeared to have changed considerably, which was only to be expected.     
14       adv   You can use only in front of a verb to indicate that the result of something is unfortunate or undesirable and is likely to make the situation worse rather than better.  
ADV before v   (=just)  
The embargo would only hurt innocent civilians..., She says that legalising prostitution will only cause problems.     
15    If you say you only have to or have only to do one thing in order to achieve or prove a second thing, you are emphasizing how easily the second thing can be achieved or proved.  
have only to/only have to      phrase   V inflects, PHR inf     (emphasis)    Any time you want a babysitter, dear, you only have to ask..., We have only to read the labels to know what ingredients are in foods.     
16    You can say that something has only just happened when you want to emphasize that it happened a very short time ago.  
only just      phrase   PHR before v, PHR adv     (emphasis)    I've only just arrived..., The signs of an economic revival are only just beginning...     
17    You use only just to emphasize that something is true, but by such a small degree that it is almost not true at all.  
only just      phrase   usu PHR before v, PHR with cl/group     (emphasis)    For centuries farmers there have only just managed to survive..., I am old enough to remember the Blitz, but only just...     
18    You can use only too to emphasize that something is true or exists to a much greater extent than you would expect or like.  
only too      phrase   PHR adv/adj     (emphasis)    I know only too well that plans can easily go wrong..., When the new baby comes along it is only too easy to shut out the others.     
19    You can say that you are only too happy to do something to emphasize how willing you are to do it.  
only too      phrase   PHR adj     (emphasis)    I'll be only too pleased to help them out with any queries.     
20   
    if only  
    if  
    not only  
    not  
    the one and only  
    one  
Translation English - Cobuild Collins Dictionary  
Collaborative Dictionary     English Cobuild
id.
At a point where you know you have to make a decision that not only effects your life, not only the life of the objects you love but the ones that you consider as well. More than one crux will certainly cause an individual to have a dilemma or two.
exp.
have a powerful impact on someone; impress; generate an emotion (positive, but also negative)
it can be used to describe a feeling of fear or a positive emotion; e.g.: "This violin music gives me the chills" or "Being all alone in that old house after dark...it gave me the chills."
n.
business linked to the Internet but also to traditional economy
INTERNET
exp.
you only live once
[Fam.] acronym
exp.
non, pas encore
adj.
tending to repair (also reparatory)
exp.
absolutely not; not in this lifetime
Slang expression used mostly in 19th century
exp.
not an easy task
id.
expression meaning that one should not criticize someone else for a mistake that he/she also makes or a flaw that he/she also has
exp.
a humorous way of saying that someone doesn't like or love the speaker.
[Hum.] E.g.: You've seen the way she treated me last time we met. It's clear: she loves me not.
v.
A culture of internet only jobs has coined the phrase Wirk. Wirk simply means Internet Work. Internet work is defined by job opportunities that did not exist before the rise of the internet and furthermore the work is likely to be carried out over the internet and payment received for work undertaken via the internet. Wirk describes both full time and part time internet work. Because of the nature of Wirk and the ability for anyone that has internet connection to earn money from Wirk, it is currently more likely to be a part time occupation than full time. Paid Online Questionnaires, Content Writing, Search Marketing are all examples of Wirk.
This is a term rising in popularity
exp.
not right; out of order; not functioning properly
adj.
(about persons) not to be trusted; dangerous
exp.
be/not be interested in getting married and having a family
n.
restaurant; bar, pub, cafe that serves also food
[UK]
v.
not to include something
I want to try a diet that excludes dairy products.
n.
something not worthy; something of poor quality; a crap
[Slang] This book is a bag of wank, I am disappointed.
exp.
not matter; have no value or effect; be useless
n.
free time spent taking care also of work-related tasks
formed based on "work" and "leisure"
n.
The world's only vocabulary game that feeds the hungry! in association with World Food Programme. Play, learn and donate rice with every right answer!
Give free rice to hungry people by playing a simple game that increases your knowledge. freerice.com wfp.org
adj.
(about a product or service) meant to meet the customers' basic requirements; with no add-ons, including only the basic features
E.g: It's a no frills hotel, but very clean and with friendly staff.
n.
law of evolution, only the fittest survive, the ones that can adapt
exp.
to do two things at the same time using the effort needed to do only one
n.
Free On Board: A legal term meaning that when the seller loads merchandise for transportation, he bears full responsibility for it but if the merchandise is later lost or harmed, the buyer suffers the loss.
n.
A currency coin worth $1.00 in Canada. Bigger than a quarter but smaller than a tooney.
looney also can mean strange or weird. ex.He had always been a little bit looney.
n.
the complete opposite of a sugar daddy, one who tries, but is broke and fronting.
[Slang] salty mama
n.
this expression means 'he is very good at criticizing others but he can't accept criticism from others'

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"Collins Cobuild English Dictionary for Advanced Learners 4th edition published in 2003 © HarperCollins Publishers 1987, 1995, 2001, 2003 and Collins A-Z Thesaurus 1st edition first published in 1995 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995"
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