leap of faith meaning, leap of faith definition | English Cobuild dictionary

Collins

leap of faith

  
     ( leaps of faith    plural  ) If you take aleap of faith, you do something even though you are not sure it is right or will succeed.      n-count   a N in sing  
Take a leap of faith and trust them.     
Translation English - Cobuild Collins Dictionary  
Collins
leap     ( leaps    plural & 3rd person present)   ( leaping    present participle)   ( leaped    past tense)   ( leapt    past participle  )
British English usually uses the form leapt as the past tense and past participle. American English usually uses leaped.     
1       verb   If you leap, you jump high in the air or jump a long distance.   (=jump)  
He had leapt from a window in the building and escaped...      V prep/adv  
The man threw his arms out as he leapt.      V  
      Leap is also a noun., n-count  
Smith took Britain's fifth medal of the championships with a leap of 2.37 metres.     
2       verb   If you leap somewhere, you move there suddenly and quickly.  
The two men leaped into the jeep and roared off...      V prep/adv  
With a terrible howl, he leapt forward and threw himself into the water.      V prep/adv  
3       verb   If a vehicle leaps somewhere, it moves there in a short sudden movement.  
The car leapt forward.      V adv/prep  
4       n-count   A leap is a large and important change, increase, or advance.     (JOURNALISM)   oft N in n  
The result has been a giant leap in productivity., ...the leap in the unemployed from 35,000 to 75,000..., Contemporary art has taken a huge leap forward in the last five or six years.     
5       verb   If you leapto a particular place or position, you make a large and important change, increase, or advance.  
Warwicks leap to third in the table, 31 points behind leaders Essex.      V prep  
6       verb   If you leapat a chance or opportunity, you accept it quickly and eagerly.   (=jump)  
The post of principal of the theatre school became vacant and he leapt at the chance.      V at n  
7    You can use in leaps and bounds or by leaps and bounds to emphasize that someone or something is improving or increasing quickly and greatly.  
in leaps and bounds/by leaps and bounds      phrase   usu PHR after v     (emphasis)    He's improved in leaps and bounds this season..., The total number of species on the planet appears to be growing by leaps and bounds.     


leap of faith        ( leaps of faith    plural  ) If you take aleap of faith, you do something even though you are not sure it is right or will succeed.      n-count   a N in sing  
Take a leap of faith and trust them.     
leap year        ( leap years    plural  ) A leap year is a year which has 366 days. The extra day is the 29th February. There is a leap year every four years.      n-count  

Translation English - Cobuild Collins Dictionary  

Collins

leap

  

      vb  
1    bounce, bound, caper, cavort, frisk, gambol, hop, jump, skip, spring  
2      (figurative)   arrive at, come to, form hastily, hasten, hurry, jump, reach, rush  
3    clear, jump (over), vault  
4    advance, become prominent, escalate, gain attention, increase, rocket, soar, surge  
      n  
5    bound, caper, frisk, hop, jump, skip, spring, vault  
6    escalation, increase, rise, surge, upsurge, upswing  

English Collins Dictionary - English synonyms & Thesaurus  

See also:

leap year, leapt, lap, leapfrog

Collaborative Dictionary     English Cobuild
exp.
go for something, take one's chances
n.
a willingness to believe in the absence of sufficient evidence, or contrary to the evidence.
this could cover all instances of use of the word 'faith'.

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"Collins Cobuild English Dictionary for Advanced Learners 4th edition published in 2003 © HarperCollins Publishers 1987, 1995, 2001, 2003 and Collins A-Z Thesaurus 1st edition first published in 1995 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995"