leap of faith meaning, leap of faith definition | English Cobuild dictionary

Collins

leap of faith

  
     ( leaps of faith    plural  ) If you take aleap of faith, you do something even though you are not sure it is right or will succeed.      n-count   a N in sing  
Take a leap of faith and trust them.     
Translation English - Cobuild Collins Dictionary  
Collins
leap     ( leaps    plural & 3rd person present)   ( leaping    present participle)   ( leaped    past tense)   ( leapt    past participle  )
British English usually uses the form leapt as the past tense and past participle. American English usually uses leaped.     
1       verb   If you leap, you jump high in the air or jump a long distance.   (=jump)  
He had leapt from a window in the building and escaped...      V prep/adv  
The man threw his arms out as he leapt.      V  
      Leap is also a noun., n-count  
Smith took Britain's fifth medal of the championships with a leap of 2.37 metres.     
2       verb   If you leap somewhere, you move there suddenly and quickly.  
The two men leaped into the jeep and roared off...      V prep/adv  
With a terrible howl, he leapt forward and threw himself into the water.      V prep/adv  
3       verb   If a vehicle leaps somewhere, it moves there in a short sudden movement.  
The car leapt forward.      V adv/prep  
4       n-count   A leap is a large and important change, increase, or advance.     (JOURNALISM)   oft N in n  
The result has been a giant leap in productivity., ...the leap in the unemployed from 35,000 to 75,000..., Contemporary art has taken a huge leap forward in the last five or six years.     
5       verb   If you leapto a particular place or position, you make a large and important change, increase, or advance.  
Warwicks leap to third in the table, 31 points behind leaders Essex.      V prep  
6       verb   If you leapat a chance or opportunity, you accept it quickly and eagerly.   (=jump)  
The post of principal of the theatre school became vacant and he leapt at the chance.      V at n  
7    You can use in leaps and bounds or by leaps and bounds to emphasize that someone or something is improving or increasing quickly and greatly.  
in leaps and bounds/by leaps and bounds      phrase   usu PHR after v     (emphasis)    He's improved in leaps and bounds this season..., The total number of species on the planet appears to be growing by leaps and bounds.     


leap of faith        ( leaps of faith    plural  ) If you take aleap of faith, you do something even though you are not sure it is right or will succeed.      n-count   a N in sing  
Take a leap of faith and trust them.     
leap year        ( leap years    plural  ) A leap year is a year which has 366 days. The extra day is the 29th February. There is a leap year every four years.      n-count  

Translation English - Cobuild Collins Dictionary  

Collins

leap

  

      vb  
1    bounce, bound, caper, cavort, frisk, gambol, hop, jump, skip, spring  
2      (figurative)   arrive at, come to, form hastily, hasten, hurry, jump, reach, rush  
3    clear, jump (over), vault  
4    advance, become prominent, escalate, gain attention, increase, rocket, soar, surge  
      n  
5    bound, caper, frisk, hop, jump, skip, spring, vault  
6    escalation, increase, rise, surge, upsurge, upswing  

English Collins Dictionary - English synonyms & Thesaurus  

See also:

leap year, leapt, lap, leapfrog

Collaborative Dictionary     English Cobuild
n.
a willingness to believe in the absence of sufficient evidence, or contrary to the evidence.
this could cover all instances of use of the word 'faith'.
exp.
go for something, take one's chances

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"Collins Cobuild English Dictionary for Advanced Learners 4th edition published in 2003 © HarperCollins Publishers 1987, 1995, 2001, 2003 and Collins A-Z Thesaurus 1st edition first published in 1995 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995"