keep your breath to cool your porridge meaning, keep your... | English Cobuild dictionary

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balance

  
  ( balances    plural & 3rd person present)   ( balancing    present participle)   ( balanced    past tense & past participle  )
1       verb   If you balance something somewhere, or if it balances there, it remains steady and does not fall.  
I balanced on the ledge...      V prep/adv  
He balanced a football on his head.      V n prep/adv  
2       n-uncount   Balance is the ability to remain steady when you are standing up.  
The medicines you are currently taking could be affecting your balance.     
3       v-recip   If you balance one thing with something different, each of the things has the same strength or importance.  
Balance spicy dishes with mild ones...      V n with n  
The state has got to find some way to balance these two needs...      V pl-n  
Supply and demand on the currency market will generally balance.      pl-n V, Also V with n  
  balanced      adj   usu adv ADJ  
This book is a well balanced biography.     
4       n-sing   A balance is a situation in which all the different parts are equal in strength or importance.  
with supp, oft N between pl-n  
Their marriage is a delicate balance between traditional and contemporary values..., ...the ecological balance of the forest.     
5       n-sing   If you say that thebalance tips in your favour, you start winning or succeeding, especially in a conflict or contest.  
the N  
...a powerful new gun which could tip the balance of the war in their favour...     
6       verb   If you balance one thing against another, you consider its importance in relation to the other one.  
She carefully tried to balance religious sensitivities against democratic freedom.      V n against n  
7       verb   If someone balances their budget or if a government balances the economy of a country, they make sure that the amount of money that is spent is not greater than the amount that is received.  
He balanced his budgets by rigid control over public expenditure.      V n  
8       verb   If you balance your books or make them balance, you prove by calculation that the amount of money you have received is equal to the amount that you have spent.  
...teaching them to balance the books...      V n  
To make the books balance, spending must fall and taxes must rise.      V  
9       n-count   The balance in your bank account is the amount of money you have in it.  
usu with supp  
I'd like to check the balance in my account please.     
10       n-sing   Thebalance of an amount of money is what remains to be paid for something or what remains when part of the amount has been spent.  
the N   (=remainder)  
They were due to pay the balance on delivery.     
11   
    bank balance  
12    If something hangs in the balance, it is uncertain whether it will happen or continue.  
in the balance      phrase   PHR after v, v-link PHR  
The fate of a project which could revolutionise the use of computers in hospitals hangs in the balance.     
13    If you keep your balance, for example when standing in a moving vehicle, you remain steady and do not fall over. If you lose your balance, you become unsteady and fall over.  
keep your balance             phrase   V inflects  
14    If you are off balance, you are in an unsteady position and about to fall.  
off balance      phrase   PHR after v, v-link PHR  
A gust of wind knocked him off balance and he fell face down in the mud.     
15    If you are thrown off balance by something, you are surprised or confused by it.  
off balance      phrase   PHR after v  
She was trying to behave as if his visit hadn't thrown her off balance.     
16    You can say on balance to indicate that you are stating an opinion after considering all the relevant facts or arguments.  
on balance      phrase   PHR with cl  
On balance he agreed with Christine.      balance out      phrasal verb   If two or more opposite things balance out or if you balance them out, they become equal in amount, value, or effect.  
Outgoings and revenues balanced out...      V P  
The strenuous exercise undergone could balance out the increased calories.      V P n (not pron), Also V n P  
Translation English - Cobuild Collins Dictionary  
Collaborative Dictionary     English Cobuild
exp.
calm down!
exp.
expression used when referring to something that is unlikely to happen soon (not in the time interval that one can resist holding his breath)
E.g.: "Will the economy recover any soon?" - "Don't hold your breath."
exp.
sauve ton coeur
No idea what this means MJB
exp.
it's said for determining someone to calm down, be patient, control his/her reactions
id.
use your common sense or resourcefulness
n.
to support your family
exp.
expression used for catching the attention of an audience
exp.
absolutely not; not in this lifetime
Slang expression used mostly in 19th century
exp.
your best clothes that you wear on special occasions
exp.
expression used to encourage someone to share with you what's on his mind
exp.
= get your knickers in a twist/knot
US English, colloquial
adj.
cool
Slang for "excellent" "That is so coolio!" with the meaning "That is so excellent!"
exp.
keep informed of changes
"Please, keep me posted on your project`s progress."
exp.
to become very upset about something, usually something that is not important
Other expression: to get your knickers in a knot
adj.
cool, balanced, self-confident
e.g. a very together woman
n.
Couper le soufle/ Avoir le soufle coupé
the shock took my breath away
exp.
be kept waiting
n.
means a different approach or a welcome change to something. Ex.: anna has lots of wonderful ideas and motivation - she is a breath of fresh air.
[Fig.]
n.
attractive woman that you marry to show your success
n.
SEO solution in such a way that the search engines will crawl your website and ranked it well on the top position. SEO is the process of improving the search and quality of visitors to your website for targeted keywords.
v.
continue to have something; keep something
n.
in American English, 'dirt' is what British people call 'soil' ('put some dirt in a plant pot'). In British English, dirt has the connotation of being dirty ('you've got some dirt on your shoe')
n.
coffee shop used as an office especially using internet connection with your laptop computer
new term coined in 2010, not entered yet as "official"
n.
something that limits your freedom to do what you want
[US] constraints on spending have forced the company to rethink its plans.
n.
to concentrate and to sacrifice
exp.
when you are happy, people will want to be around you and share your happiness, but when you are sad, people will avoid you.

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"Collins Cobuild English Dictionary for Advanced Learners 4th edition published in 2003 © HarperCollins Publishers 1987, 1995, 2001, 2003 and Collins A-Z Thesaurus 1st edition first published in 1995 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995"
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