in tune with/out of tune with meaning, in tune with/out of tune with definition | English Cobuild dictionary

Collins

tune  

  ( tunes    plural & 3rd person present)   ( tuning    present participle)   ( tuned    past tense & past participle  )
1       n-count   A tune is a series of musical notes that is pleasant and easy to remember.   (=melody)  
She was humming a merry little tune.     
2       n-count   You can refer to a song or a short piece of music as a tune.  
She'll also be playing your favourite pop tunes.     
3       verb   When someone tunes a musical instrument, they adjust it so that it produces the right notes.  
`We do tune our guitars before we go on,' he insisted.      V n  
      Tune up means the same as tune., phrasal verb  
Others were quietly tuning up their instruments.      V P n (not pron)  
4       verb   When an engine or machine is tuned, it is adjusted so that it works well.  
usu passive  
Drivers are urged to make sure that car engines are properly tuned.      be V-ed  
      Tune up means the same as tune., phrasal verb  
The shop charges up to $500 to tune up a Porsche.      V P n (not pron)  
5       verb   If your radio or television is tunedto a particular broadcasting station, you are listening to or watching the programmes being broadcast by that station.  
usu passive  
A small colour television was tuned to an afternoon soap opera.      be V-ed to n  
6   
    fine-tune  
    signature tune  
    tuning fork  
7    If you say that a person or organization is calling the tune, you mean that they are in a position of power or control in a particular situation.  
call the tune      phrase   V inflects  
Who would then be calling the tune in Parliament?     
8    If you say that someone has changed their tune, you are criticizing them because they have changed their opinion or way of doing things.  
change one's tune      phrase   V inflects     (disapproval)    You've changed your tune since this morning, haven't you?...     
9    If you say that someone is dancing to someone else's tune, you mean that they are allowing themselves to be controlled by the other person.  
dance to sb's tune      phrase   V inflects     (disapproval)    The danger of commercialism is that the churches end up dancing to the tune of their big business sponsors.     
10    A person or musical instrument that is in tune produces exactly the right notes. A person or musical instrument that is out of tune does not produce exactly the right notes.  
in tune/out of tune      phrase   PHR after v, v-link PHR  
It was just an ordinary voice, but he sang in tune..., Many of the notes are out of tune...     
11    If you are in tune with a group of people, you are in agreement or sympathy with them. If you are out of tune with them, you are not in agreement or sympathy with them.  
in tune with/out of tune with             phrase   v-link PHR, PHR n  
Today, his change of direction seems more in tune with the times..., The peace campaigners were probably out of tune with most Britons.     
12    To the tune of a particular amount of money means to the extent of that amount.  
to the tune of      prep-phrase   PREP amount  
They've been sponsoring the World Cup to the tune of a million and a half pounds.     
13   
    he who pays the piper calls the tune  
    piper   tune in  
1       phrasal verb   If you tune in to a particular television or radio station or programme, you watch or listen to it.  
More than six million youngsters tune in to Blockbusters every day...      V P to n  
The idea that people plan their radio listening is nonsense; most tune in impulsively.      V P  
2       phrasal verb   If you tune into something such as your own or other people's feelings, you become aware of them.  
You can start now to tune in to your own physical, social and spiritual needs.      V P to n  
    tuned in   tune up      phrasal verb   When a group of musicians tune up, they adjust their instruments so that they produce the right notes.  
I could hear the sound of a band tuning up.      V P  
    tune 4  
Translation English - Cobuild Collins Dictionary  
Collins
tune     ( tunes    plural & 3rd person present)   ( tuning    present participle)   ( tuned    past tense & past participle  )
1       n-count   A tune is a series of musical notes that is pleasant and easy to remember.   (=melody)  
She was humming a merry little tune.     
2       n-count   You can refer to a song or a short piece of music as a tune.  
She'll also be playing your favourite pop tunes.     
3       verb   When someone tunes a musical instrument, they adjust it so that it produces the right notes.  
`We do tune our guitars before we go on,' he insisted.      V n  
      Tune up means the same as tune., phrasal verb  
Others were quietly tuning up their instruments.      V P n (not pron)  
4       verb   When an engine or machine is tuned, it is adjusted so that it works well.  
usu passive  
Drivers are urged to make sure that car engines are properly tuned.      be V-ed  
      Tune up means the same as tune., phrasal verb  
The shop charges up to $500 to tune up a Porsche.      V P n (not pron)  
5       verb   If your radio or television is tunedto a particular broadcasting station, you are listening to or watching the programmes being broadcast by that station.  
usu passive  
A small colour television was tuned to an afternoon soap opera.      be V-ed to n  
6   
    fine-tune  
    signature tune  
    tuning fork  
7    If you say that a person or organization is calling the tune, you mean that they are in a position of power or control in a particular situation.  
call the tune      phrase   V inflects  
Who would then be calling the tune in Parliament?     
8    If you say that someone has changed their tune, you are criticizing them because they have changed their opinion or way of doing things.  
change one's tune      phrase   V inflects     (disapproval)    You've changed your tune since this morning, haven't you?...     
9    If you say that someone is dancing to someone else's tune, you mean that they are allowing themselves to be controlled by the other person.  
dance to sb's tune      phrase   V inflects     (disapproval)    The danger of commercialism is that the churches end up dancing to the tune of their big business sponsors.     
10    A person or musical instrument that is in tune produces exactly the right notes. A person or musical instrument that is out of tune does not produce exactly the right notes.  
in tune/out of tune      phrase   PHR after v, v-link PHR  
It was just an ordinary voice, but he sang in tune..., Many of the notes are out of tune...     
11    If you are in tune with a group of people, you are in agreement or sympathy with them. If you are out of tune with them, you are not in agreement or sympathy with them.  
in tune with/out of tune with      phrase   v-link PHR, PHR n  
Today, his change of direction seems more in tune with the times..., The peace campaigners were probably out of tune with most Britons.     
12    To the tune of a particular amount of money means to the extent of that amount.  
to the tune of      prep-phrase   PREP amount  
They've been sponsoring the World Cup to the tune of a million and a half pounds.     
13   
    he who pays the piper calls the tune  
    piper   tune in  
1       phrasal verb   If you tune in to a particular television or radio station or programme, you watch or listen to it.  
More than six million youngsters tune in to Blockbusters every day...      V P to n  
The idea that people plan their radio listening is nonsense; most tune in impulsively.      V P  
2       phrasal verb   If you tune into something such as your own or other people's feelings, you become aware of them.  
You can start now to tune in to your own physical, social and spiritual needs.      V P to n  
    tuned in   tune up      phrasal verb   When a group of musicians tune up, they adjust their instruments so that they produce the right notes.  
I could hear the sound of a band tuning up.      V P  
    tune 4  


fine-tune        ( fine-tunes    3rd person present)   ( fine-tuning    present participle)   ( fine-tuned    past tense & past participle  ) If you fine-tune something, you make very small and precise changes to it in order to make it as successful or effective as it possibly can be.      verb  
We do not try to fine-tune the economy on the basis of short-term predictions...      V n  
  fine-tuning      n-uncount  
There's a lot of fine-tuning to be done yet.     
signature tune        ( signature tunes    plural  ) A signature tune is the tune which is always played at the beginning or end of a particular television or radio programme, or which people associate with a particular performer.  
  (mainly BRIT)      n-count  
Doesn't that sound like the signature tune from The Late Late Show?     
in AM, usually use theme song     

Translation English - Cobuild Collins Dictionary  

Collins

tune  


      n  
1    air, melody, melody line, motif, song, strain, theme  
2    agreement, concert, concord, consonance, euphony, harmony, pitch, sympathy, unison  
3    attitude, demeanour, disposition, frame of mind, mood  
4    call the tune      be in charge, be in command, be in control, call the shots     (slang)   command, dictate, govern, lead, rule, rule the roost  
5    change one's tune      change one's mind, do an about-face, have a change of heart, reconsider, take a different tack, think again  
      vb  
6    adapt, adjust, attune, bring into harmony, harmonize, pitch, regulate  
  
Antonyms     
,       n  
2    clashing, conflict, contention, disagreement, discord, discordance, disharmony, disunity, friction  

English Collins Dictionary - English synonyms & Thesaurus  

Collaborative Dictionary     English Cobuild
exp.
(lit., about sounds) disharmonious, dissonant; (fig.) out of order; dysfunctional

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"Collins Cobuild English Dictionary for Advanced Learners 4th edition published in 2003 © HarperCollins Publishers 1987, 1995, 2001, 2003 and Collins A-Z Thesaurus 1st edition first published in 1995 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995"