in the true sense (of the word) meaning, in the true sense (of the word) definition | English Cobuild dictionary

Collins

true  

  ( truer    comparative)   ( truest    superlative  )
1       adj   If something is true, it is based on facts rather than being invented or imagined, and is accurate and reliable.  
oft it v-link ADJ that  
Everything I had heard about him was true..., The film tells the true story of a group who survived in the Andes in sub-zero temperatures.     
2       adj   You use true to emphasize that a person or thing is sincere or genuine, often in contrast to something that is pretended or hidden.  
ADJ n     (emphasis)    (=real)  
I allowed myself to acknowledge my true feelings..., The true cost often differs from that which had first been projected...     
3       adj   If you use true to describe something or someone, you approve of them because they have all the characteristics or qualities that such a person or thing typically has.  
ADJ n     (approval)    (=real)  
Maybe one day you'll find true love..., The ability to work collaboratively is a true test of leadership..., I think he's a true genius.     
4       adj   If you say that a fact is trueof a particular person or situation, you mean that it is valid or relevant for them.  
v-link ADJ of/for n  
I accept that the romance may have gone out of the marriage, but surely this is true of many couples..., Expenditure on health in most of these countries has gone down, and the same is true for education.     
5       adj   If you are true to someone, you remain committed and loyal to them. If you are true to an idea or promise, you remain committed to it and continue to act according to it.  
v-link ADJ to n   (=faithful)  
David was true to his wife..., India has remained true to democracy..., She's been true to her word from day one.     
6    If a dream, wish, or prediction comes true, it actually happens.  
come true      phrase   V inflects  
Owning a place of their own is a dream come true for the couple.     
7    If a general statement holds true in particular circumstances, or if your previous statement holds true in different circumstances, it is true or valid in those circumstances.  
FORMAL  
hold true      phrase   V inflects, oft PHR for n  
This law is known to hold true for galaxies at a distance of at least several billion light years.     
8    If you say that something seems too good to be true, you are suspicious of it because it seems better than you had expected, and you think there may something wrong with it that you have not noticed.  
too good to be true      phrase   v-link PHR  
On the whole the celebrations were remarkably good-humoured and peaceful. Indeed, it seemed almost too good to be true.     
9    If you say that something such as a story or a film is true to life, you approve of it because it seems real.  
true to life      phrase   v-link PHR     (approval)    The opening scenes of this movie are just not true to life.     
10   
    true colours  
    colour  
    true to form  
    form  
    to ring true  
    ring  
    tried and true  
    tried  


true-blue   , true blue  
1       adj   If you describe someone as true-blue, you mean that they are right-wing in their ideas and opinions.  
  (BRIT)  
Her husband is a true blue Tory.     
2       adj   A true-blue supporter of something is someone who is very loyal and reliable.  
  (AM)  
Translation English - Cobuild Collins Dictionary  
Collaborative Dictionary     English Cobuild
n.
euphemism referring to the word "fuck"
n.
a portmanteau of 'employer' and 'voyeurism'. signifies the act of searching for an employer or the practice of an employer when looking to fill positions. The term places an emphasis on the secretive connotation of the word 'voyeur', denoting a clandestine and thus superior form of employment search
[Tech.] Ex.: Employerism is what one must engage in, if one wishes to embark upon a more productive job hunt!
id.
use your common sense or resourcefulness
n.
a new word formed by joining together two others and combining their meanings. Examples: brunch, camcorder, carjack, motel, greenwash, smog, workaholic.
v.
to say, pronounce, speak
ex.: The child sounded out each word out loud as she read her book.
n.
colloquial word for a dollar
n.
charver is another word for chav
If you lived in Newcastle you would know it. Common in NE England
n.
euphemism referring to the taboo word "nigger"
n.
The state of being acceptable or officially true; the statement that is powerful to convince someone something is right.
n.
the process of reaching a conclusion about something because of other things that you know to be true
[US] I often find my stuff by using deduction but sometimes it doesn't help at all.
n.
Something that you think is true because it is very likely
I had the presumption that my holiday is going to be great because I was planning to go back to Japan.
exp.
When sth sounds too good to be true and not as good as it seems to be and you suspect that there is a hidden problem
n.
euphemism used to refer to the taboo word "cunt"
id.
the phrase is uttered in an attempt to excuse the user of profanity or curses in the presence of those offended by it under the pretense of the words being part of a foreign language
Syn.: excuse my French
n.
set of words and word groups together with their definition, translation, grammar category or usage examples, and which can be searched through an index or a search engine
n.
a colloquial word meaning a bribe: policemen accepting bungs from journalists
adv.
A formal word that is put in the beginning of sentence that has a similar meaning to furthermore, therefore, and from now on
I like ice-cream; Hence, I have lots of ice-cream cups in my fridge
exp.
positive outburst of emotion; the final word in a string of lyrics by Michael Jackson.
n.
Lesewut is a German word for "reading craze" (literally) used to describe a specific period in the intellectual history of Germany from the late eighteenth century onward.
n.
a humorous and old-fashioned word that means a chamber pot
Comes from the fact that the chamber pot 'gazunder' (= goes under) the bed
o.
word used to describe the sound made by the wheels of a train
by extension, it can be applied to other rhythmic similar sounds (for example, the sound of a clock or of a typing machine)
exp.
act in accordance with what is set verbally; apply what one's preaching for; double words by action;
often used in combination with "talk the talk".

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"Collins Cobuild English Dictionary for Advanced Learners 4th edition published in 2003 © HarperCollins Publishers 1987, 1995, 2001, 2003 and Collins A-Z Thesaurus 1st edition first published in 1995 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995"
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