i guess so meaning, i guess so definition | English Cobuild dictionary

Collins

guess

  
  ( guesses    plural & 3rd person present)   ( guessing    present participle)   ( guessed    past tense & past participle  )
1       verb   If you guess something, you give an answer or provide an opinion which may not be true because you do not have definite knowledge about the matter concerned.  
The suit was faultless: Wood guessed that he was a very successful publisher or a banker...      V that  
You can only guess at what mental suffering they endure...      V at n/wh  
Paula reached for her camera, guessed distance and exposure, and shot two frames...      V n  
Guess what I did for the whole of the first week...      V wh  
If she guessed wrong, it meant twice as many meetings the following week.      V adv  
2       verb   If you guessthat something is the case, you correctly form the opinion that it is the case, although you do not have definite knowledge about it.  
By now you will have guessed that I'm back in Ireland...      V that  
He should have guessed what would happen...      V wh  
Someone might have guessed our secret and passed it on.      V n  
3       n-count   A guess is an attempt to give an answer or provide an opinion which may not be true because you do not have definite knowledge about the matter concerned.  
oft N that, N at n, N as to n/wh  
My guess is that the chance that these vaccines will work is zero..., He'd taken her pulse and made a guess at her blood pressure..., Well, we can hazard a guess at the answer.     
4    If you say that something is anyone's guess or anybody's guess, you mean that no-one can be certain about what is really true.  
INFORMAL  
anyone's guess/anybody's guess      phrase   v-link PHR  
Just when this will happen is anyone's guess...     
5    You say at a guess to indicate that what you are saying is only an estimate or what you believe to be true, rather than being a definite fact.  
at a guess      phrase   PHR with cl     (vagueness)    At a guess he's been dead for two days.     
6    You say I guess to show that you are slightly uncertain or reluctant about what you are saying.  
  (mainly AM)  
INFORMAL  
I guess             phrase   PHR with cl, PHR so/not     (vagueness)    I guess she thought that was pretty smart..., I guess he's right..., `I think you're being paranoid.'<emdash>`Yeah. I guess so.'     
7    If someone keeps you guessing, they do not tell you what you want to know.  
keep someone guessing      phrase   V inflects  
The author's intention is to keep everyone guessing until the bitter end...     
8    You say guess what to draw attention to something exciting, surprising, or interesting that you are about to say.  
INFORMAL  
guess what      convention  
Guess what, I just got my first part in a movie.     
Translation English - Cobuild Collins Dictionary  
Collaborative Dictionary     English Cobuild
n.
Phrase used when someone has brought all the evidences to support his point of view; "I'm done with explanations"
exp.
I can't understand it, I can't believe it, I can't accept it
n.
"It's a list of all the people and things I hate so much I want to hit them in the face with a shovel." Concept coming from the Marian Keyes novel, The Mystery of Mercy Close (2012).
n.
(british slang) "a strong drink" as in "i need a stiff whisky so pour me a real snorter", or (nautical slang) "a strong wind".
Slang
exp.
acronym of As Far As I Know, from the best of my knowledge, according to the information that I have
exp.
I have no idea; I don't have a clue
[Informal] E.g.: Why was she upset? - Beats me!
exp.
it occurred to me, I suddenly thought of it, I had an idea all of a sudden
E.g: I wondered all day long how to solve this problem and it suddenly hit me...I had to talk to Marry.
n.
To delibaretly make someone feel frightened especially so that they will do what you want ; scared and follow directions of yours or what you want thing to be ...
n.
activity involving dumping a bucket of ice water on your head and challenge other three friends to do so in order to promote awareness of the disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and encourage donations to research.
also called "ice water challenge", viral campaign on social media during July–August 2014
n.
to get so focused on the details or intricacies of something that you miss the big picture or the main point
His book subject is quite good, but he tends to miss the forest for the trees. (tending to get in too much detail and miss the essence).
n.
used to describe a person. i.e this is the qua am telling you about or he is a fantastic qua
n.
a false acronym created "backwards", i.e. from a phrase deliberately invented to generate the acronym, e.g. posh "port out starboard home".
n.
means a liquid is not clear: this tea's got bits in it, I don't like yogurt with bits in it
assez proche de l'idée de 'il y a à boire et à manger'

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"Collins Cobuild English Dictionary for Advanced Learners 4th edition published in 2003 © HarperCollins Publishers 1987, 1995, 2001, 2003 and Collins A-Z Thesaurus 1st edition first published in 1995 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995"