high ground meaning, high ground definition | English Cobuild dictionary


high ground

1       n-sing   If a person or organization has the high ground in an argument or dispute, that person or organization has an advantage.     (JOURNALISM)   the N, oft the adj N  
The President must seek to regain the high ground in the political debate...     
2    If you say that someone has taken themoral high ground, you mean that they consider that their policies and actions are morally superior to the policies and actions of their rivals.  
the moral high ground      phrase   PHR after v  
The Republicans took the moral high ground with the message that they were best equipped to manage the authority...     
Translation English Cobuild Collins Dictionary  



1    elevated, lofty, soaring, steep, tall, towering  
2    excessive, extraordinary, extreme, great, intensified, sharp, strong  
3    arch, big-time     (informal)   chief, consequential, distinguished, eminent, exalted, important, influential, leading, major league     (informal)   notable, powerful, prominent, ruling, significant, superior  
4    arrogant, boastful, bragging, despotic, domineering, haughty, lofty, lordly, ostentatious, overbearing, proud, tyrannical, vainglorious  
5    capital, extreme, grave, important, serious  
6    boisterous, bouncy     (informal)   cheerful, elated, excited, exhilarated, exuberant, joyful, light-hearted, merry, strong, tumultuous, turbulent  
7      (informal)   delirious, euphoric, freaked out     (informal)   hyped up     (slang)   inebriated, intoxicated, on a trip     (informal)   spaced out     (slang)   stoned     (slang)   tripping     (informal)   turned on     (slang)   zonked     (slang)  
8    costly, dear, exorbitant, expensive, high-priced, steep     (informal)   stiff  
9    acute, high-pitched, penetrating, piercing, piping, sharp, shrill, soprano, strident, treble  
10    extravagant, grand, lavish, luxurious, rich  
11    gamey, niffy     (Brit. slang)   pongy     (Brit. informal)   strong-flavoured, tainted, whiffy     (Brit. slang)  
12    high and dry      abandoned, bereft, destitute, helpless, stranded  
13    high and low      all over, everywhere, exhaustively, far and wide, in every nook and cranny  
14    high and mighty        (informal)   arrogant, cavalier, conceited, disdainful, haughty, imperious, overbearing, self-important, snobbish, stuck-up     (informal)   superior  
15    aloft, at great height, far up, way up  
16    apex, crest, height, peak, record level, summit, top  
17      (informal)   delirium, ecstasy, euphoria, intoxication, trip     (informal)  
1    dwarfed, low, short, stunted  
2    average, low, mild, moderate, reduced, restrained, routine, suppressed  
3    average, common, degraded, ignoble, inconsequential, insignificant, low, lowly, low-ranking, menial, routine, secondary, undistinguished, unimportant  
6    angry, dejected, depressed, gloomy, low, melancholy, sad  
9    alto, bass, deep, gruff, low, low-pitched  

A1 or A-one     (informal)   choice, classy     (slang)   elite, exclusive, first-rate, high-quality, high-toned, posh     (informal, chiefly Brit.)   ritzy     (slang)   select, superior, swish     (informal, chiefly Brit.)   tip-top, top-drawer, top-flight, tops     (slang)   U     (Brit. informal)   up-market, upper-class  
   cheap, cheapo     (informal)   common, inferior, mediocre, ordinary, run-of-the-mill  
elaborate, exaggerated, extravagant, florid, grandiose, high-falutin     (informal)   inflated, lofty, magniloquent, overblown, pretentious  
   down-to-earth, moderate, modest, practical, pragmatic, realistic, reasonable, restrained, sensible, simple, straightforward, unpretentious  
arbitrary, autocratic, bossy     (informal)   despotic, dictatorial, domineering, imperious, inconsiderate, oppressive, overbearing, peremptory, self-willed, tyrannical, wilful  
high jinks     
fun and games, horseplay, jollity, junketing, merrymaking, revelry, skylarking     (informal)   sport, spree  
elevated, ethical, fair, good, honourable, idealistic, magnanimous, moral, noble, principled, pure, righteous, upright, virtuous, worthy  
   dishonest, dishonourable, unethical, unfair  
integrity, probity, rectitude, scrupulousness, uprightness  
aggressive, driving, dynamic, effective, energetic, enterprising, fast-track, forceful, go-ahead, go-getting     (informal)   highly capable, high-octane     (informal)   vigorous  
high-pressure        (of salesmanship)  
aggressive, bludgeoning, coercive, compelling, forceful, high-powered, importunate, insistent, intensive, in-your-face     (slang)   persistent, persuasive, pushy     (informal)  
costly, dear, excessive, exorbitant, expensive, extortionate, high, steep     (informal)   stiff, unreasonable  
affected, artificial, bombastic, extravagant, flamboyant, florid, grandiloquent, grandiose, high-flown, imposing, magniloquent, ostentatious, overblown, pompous, pretentious, stilted, strained  
brisk, express, fast, hotted-up     (informal)   quick, rapid, souped-up     (informal)   streamlined, swift  
alive and kicking, animated, boisterous, bold, bouncy, daring, dashing, ebullient, effervescent, energetic, exuberant, frolicsome, full of beans     (informal)   full of life, fun-loving, gallant, lively, mettlesome, sparky, spirited, spunky     (informal)   vibrant, vital, vivacious  
high spirits     
abandon, boisterousness, exhilaration, exuberance, good cheer, hilarity, joie de vivre, rare good humour  

English Collins Dictionary - English synonyms & Thesaurus  

Collaborative Dictionary     English Cobuild
Ground Zero mosque
acronym coined in 2010 based on the controversy of building a mosque on the site where the Twin Towers were before 9/11
calcium carbonate
comfortably; extravagantly
finalize smth. successfully / in a positive manner
E.g.: The negotiations were tough, but they ended on a high note
get drunk or take drugs; get high
to make a hole in ground, with a spade for example
United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees also known as The UN Refugee Agency is a United Nations agency mandated to protect and support refugees at the request of a government or the UN itself and assists in their voluntary repatriation, local integration or resettlement to a third country.
In more than six decades, UNHCR has helped tens of millions of people restart their lives. The UNHCR has won two Nobel Peace Prizes. unhcr.org en.wikipedia.org/wiki/UNHCR
(in neomarxist thought) the second main exploitive social class: The bourgeoisie of formation. The members of the formoisie have human capital, receive high wages (the most frequently thanks to their diplomas) and consume more than the world GDP. (neologism 1993 Yanick Toutain)
[Hum. Sc.] The formoisie is the social class that created social-democracy and stalinism.
A small short-term loan, with very high interest rates, that the borrower promises to repay on or near the next payday. Used by wage earners who run short of cash before payday. Payday lending is an established form of lending in the US and Canada.
Also: payday advance, overnight loan.
an urban photography trend consisting in taking the pics from the top (and usually the edge) of high buildings
renewable energy obtainable on coasts based on the sea or ocean low and high tides
a form of workout based on the usage of high heels
also called legwork
expression referring to a high amount of effort, dedication, endurance for pursuing a cause, achieving a goal
He put blood, sweat and tears in making this movie
avoir les dents longues
à forte faim, il n'y a pas de pain dur
à la saint_andré, la terre retournée, le blé semé, il peut neiger
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"Collins Cobuild English Dictionary for Advanced Learners 4th edition published in 2003 © HarperCollins Publishers 1987, 1995, 2001, 2003 and Collins A-Z Thesaurus 1st edition first published in 1995 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995"