here we go again meaning, here we go again definition | English Cobuild dictionary

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here  

1       adv   You use here when you are referring to the place where you are.  
be ADV, ADV after v, prep ADV     (Antonym: there)    I'm here all by myself and I know I'm going to get lost..., Well, I can't stand here chatting all day., ...the growing number of skiers that come here...     
2       adv   You use here when you are pointing towards a place that is near you, in order to draw someone else's attention to it.  
ADV after v, prep ADV, be ADV  
...if you will just sign here..., Come and sit here, Lauren...     
3       adv   You use here in order to indicate that the person or thing that you are talking about is near you or is being held by you.  
n ADV, ADV after v  
My friend here writes for radio...     
4       adv   If you say that you are hereto do something, that is your role or function.  
be ADV to-inf  
I'm not here to listen to your complaints.     
5       adv   You use here in order to draw attention to something or someone who has just arrived in the place where you are, or to draw attention to the place you have just arrived at.  
ADV with be, ADV before v  
`Mr Cummings is here,' she said, holding the door open...     
6       adv   You use here to refer to a particular point or stage of a situation or subject that you have come to or that you are dealing with.  
it v-link ADV that, ADV with v, ADV with cl  
The book goes into recent work in greater detail than I have attempted here...     
7       adv   You use here to refer to a period of time, a situation, or an event that is present or happening now.  
ADV before v, ADV with be  
Here is your opportunity to acquire a luxurious one bedroom home.     
8       adv   You use here at the beginning of a sentence in order to draw attention to something or to introduce something.  
ADV be n/wh  
Now here's what I want you to do...     
9       adv   You use here when you are offering or giving something to someone.  
ADV be n  
Here's some letters I want you to sign..., Here's your cash.     
10    You say `here we are' or `here you are' when the statement that you are making about someone's character or situation is unexpected.  
here sb is      phrase   V inflects, PHR with cl  
Here you are, saying these terrible things...     
11    You say `here we are' when you have just found something that you have been looking for.  
here we are      convention  
I rummaged through the drawers and came up with Amanda's folder. `Here we are.'     
12    You say `here goes' when you are about to do or say something difficult or unpleasant.  
here goes      convention  
Dr Culver nervously muttered `Here goes,' and gave the little girl an injection.     
13    You use expressions such as `here we go' and `here we go again' in order to indicate that something is happening again in the way that you expected, especially something unpleasant.  
INFORMAL  
here we go again      phrase  
At first, he was told he was too young and I thought, `Oh, boy, here we go again.'...     
14    You use here and now to emphasize that something is happening at the present time, rather than in the future or past, or that you would like it to happen at the present time.  
here and now      phrase  
  (emphasis)   
I'm a practicing physician trying to help people here and now...     
15    If something happens here and there, it happens in several different places.  
here and there      phrase   PHR with cl, PHR after v  
I do a bit of teaching here and there...     
16    You use expressions such as `here's to us' and `here's to your new job' before drinking a toast in order to wish someone success or happiness.  
here's to sth      convention  
  (formulae)   
Tony smiled and lifted his glass. `Here's to you, Amy.'     
Translation English - Cobuild Collins Dictionary  
Collaborative Dictionary     English Cobuild
id.
expression used to show full agreement on smth.
exp.
go crazy about something, get enthusiastic
v.
to be lost
he went missing my dog went missing for three days
exp.
to lose one's temper
very familiar
exp.
face a specific situation; act in a certain way
E.g.: John went out of rehab a few days ago and he is determined to not go down that road again.
exp.
go to the extreme; do everything that could be done; exhaust all possibilities and resources
n.
endearment phrase used for someone we find sweet
[Fam.] syn.: sweetie, pumpkin, cutie, cutesy pie
exp.
deteriorate very quickly
exp.
go crazy; get angry; lose self-control
E.g.: I will lose it if we keep listening to this song.
exp.
go for something, take one's chances
exp.
go out in the street to protest
n.
someone to whom everybody is turning when they need advice, help
[Fam.]
n.
a person you can go to for help, advice or information
exp.
neighborhood considered dangerous, where it's not recommended to go, especially as an outsider
exp.
do not take into account, disregard, ignore on purpose, avoid, dismiss
E.g: His boss asked him for a report, but he gave it the go-by.
exp.
from the outset, from the beginning
n.
A steep hill rises at a very sharp angle and is difficult to go up.
exp.
let the time go by without doing something important, relax, waste time
E.g.: It was a quite evening: we sat around chatting and watching TV.
exp.
go away idiot, fool ; leave me alone idiot, fool ; fuck you idiot, fool ; fuck off idiot, fool.
[Slang];[Vulg.]

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"Collins Cobuild English Dictionary for Advanced Learners 4th edition published in 2003 © HarperCollins Publishers 1987, 1995, 2001, 2003 and Collins A-Z Thesaurus 1st edition first published in 1995 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995"
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