freight bill meaning, freight bill definition | English Cobuild dictionary

Collins

freight

  
  ( freights    3rd person present)   ( freighting    present participle)   ( freighted    past tense & past participle  )
1       n-uncount   Freight is the movement of goods by lorries, trains, ships, or aeroplanes.  
France derives 16% of revenue from air freight.     
2       n-uncount   Freight is goods that are transported by lorries, trains, ships, or aeroplanes.  
90% of managers wanted to see more freight carried by rail.     
3       verb   When goods are freighted, they are transported in large quantities over a long distance.  
usu passive  
From these ports the grain is freighted down to Addis Ababa.      be V-ed adv/prep  


freight car        ( freight cars    plural  ) On a train, a freight car is a large container in which goods are transported.  
  (mainly AM)      n-count  
freight train        ( freight trains    plural  ) A freight train is a train on which goods are transported.      n-count  
Translation English Cobuild Collins Dictionary  
Collaborative Dictionary     English Cobuild
exp.
cuddle
used also as an adjective to suggest that something is suitable for a romantic experience: bill and coo hotel; bill and coo restaurant
n.
booklet, brochure, catalogue, details of bill
adj.
The ridiculous character of a religious concept or doctrine; formed from "religion" and "ridiculous", popularized by Bill Maher.
[Hum.];[Iron.];[Pej.];[Rel.] Word formed from "religion" and "ridiculous", popularized by Bill Maher: "The concepts of vicarious redemption and sacrifice are religulous."
To add entries to your own vocabulary, become a member of Reverso community or login if you are already a member. It's easy and only takes a few seconds:
Or sign up in the traditional way

head
  • Create your own vocabulary list
  • Contribute to the Collaborative Dictionary
  • Improve and share your linguistic knowledge
Advertising
"Collins Cobuild English Dictionary for Advanced Learners 4th edition published in 2003 © HarperCollins Publishers 1987, 1995, 2001, 2003 and Collins A-Z Thesaurus 1st edition first published in 1995 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995"