every action has a reaction meaning, every action has a reaction definition | English Cobuild dictionary

Collins

every

  
1       det   You use every to indicate that you are referring to all the members of a group or all the parts of something and not only some of them.  
DET sing-n  
Record every expenditure you make., ...recipes for every occasion.     
      Every is also an adjective., adj   poss ADJ n  
His every utterance will be scrutinized...     
2       det   You use every in order to say how often something happens or to indicate that something happens at regular intervals.  
We were made to attend meetings every day..., A burglary occurs every three minutes in London..., They meet here every Friday morning.     
3       det   You use every in front of a number when you are saying what proportion of people or things something happens to or applies to.  
out of/in/for DET amount  
Two out of every three Britons already own a video recorder..., About one in every 20 people have clinical depression...     
4       det   You can use every before some nouns, for example `sign', `effort', `reason', and `intention' in order to emphasize what you are saying.  
DET sing-n     (emphasis, Antonym: no)    The Congressional Budget Office says the federal deficit shows every sign of getting larger..., I think that there is every chance that you will succeed..., Every care has been taken in compiling this list.     
5       adj   If you say that someone's every whim, wish, or desire will be satisfied, you are emphasizing that everything they want will happen or be provided.  
poss ADJ n     (emphasis)    Dozens of servants had catered to his every whim.     
6    You use every in the expressions every now and then, every now and again, every once in a while, and every so often in order to indicate that something happens occasionally.  
every now and then etc      phrase   PHR after v, PHR with cl  
Stir the batter every now and then to keep it from separating..., Every so often the horse's heart and lungs are checked.     
7    If something happens every other day or every second day, for example, it happens one day, then does not happen the next day, then happens the day after that, and so on. You can also say that something happens every third week, every fourth year, and so on.  
every other day/every second day etc      phrase   PHR after v, PHR with cl  
I went home every other week...     
8   
    every bit as good as  
    bit  
    every which way  
    way  
Translation English - Cobuild Collins Dictionary  
Collaborative Dictionary     English Cobuild
exp.
it sounds interesting or attractive
adv.
A formal word that is put in the beginning of sentence that has a similar meaning to furthermore, therefore, and from now on
I like ice-cream; Hence, I have lots of ice-cream cups in my fridge
n.
verification conducted by police to find out if a person has a criminal record or not.
Usually requested by an individual for new employment, citizenship applications, name changes, etc.
n.
Total loss of reaction to the light of Pupillas , It means thar Brain is no more reactive. It means Cardiac Arrest, Cereabral Death or f the subject is conscient action of a Mydriatic Drug.
exp.
expression used to describe a lost opportunity or something that is unlikely to happen in the current circumstances
v.
the action of expanding, broaden something
n.
The study of human action and conduct.
n.
an Internet business which has failed
n.
a text or graphic element meant to prompt the user to click on a link
[Tech.] the most common call-to-actions are buttons or banners
n.
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Give free rice to hungry people by playing a simple game that increases your knowledge. freerice.com wfp.org
n.
Patient that has lost reactivity , reactions to stimulations, reflexes (Areflexia) = Dead or Comatous
v.
A culture of internet only jobs has coined the phrase Wirk. Wirk simply means Internet Work. Internet work is defined by job opportunities that did not exist before the rise of the internet and furthermore the work is likely to be carried out over the internet and payment received for work undertaken via the internet. Wirk describes both full time and part time internet work. Because of the nature of Wirk and the ability for anyone that has internet connection to earn money from Wirk, it is currently more likely to be a part time occupation than full time. Paid Online Questionnaires, Content Writing, Search Marketing are all examples of Wirk.
This is a term rising in popularity
adj.
A vain attempt or action is One that fails to achieve what was
n.
A simple, undefined reply when an ignorant comment or action is made. Source:
n.
The ability to make decisions and take action without waiting for someone to tell you what to do
I showed my initiative when I became a group leader in class.
n.
Cybercrime is criminal action of commission or omission with intent to harm targeting humans or machines using any telecommunication device via internet online or offline
[Leg.];[Tech.] cybercrime means hacking, bullying, identity theft
adj.
1. [Comp.] a device that once plugged in is automatically recognized by the system and launches the expected process without any action on the user's side; 2. [Bus.] a new employee who is able to start work without too much induction and training
[Comp.];[Bus.] can be used as both noun and adjective: plug and play device; plug and play employee or simply plug and play (noun)
exp.
act in accordance with what is set verbally; apply what one's preaching for; double words by action;
often used in combination with "talk the talk".
exp.
take an action that will complicate things; do something with a negative impact
n.
in American English, 'dirt' is what British people call 'soil' ('put some dirt in a plant pot'). In British English, dirt has the connotation of being dirty ('you've got some dirt on your shoe')
n.
an affectionate slang name for a penis, similar to tadger, which is a more common used term. Used especially in the North of England, Todger has also been used as a nickname, particularly for males called Tom and Todd
n.
Bookish knowledge; knowledge obtained through hearsay, has no sound basis
n.
sigle of "Air Launched Cruise Missile" that can find his target electronically by his own means at a long distance according to a memorized map of the landscape he has to pass over
can also be launched from the soil or the sea. they can be reprogrammed or destroyed during the fly by the "sender"
n.
a body part is a part of a human body, usually one that has been cut or torn from the body in a violent incident (such as an accident, an explosion, etc)
exp.
expression used to describe something that is in decline or has lost the qualities that made it popular, appealing, successful
used originally in media to describe a show or a movie that is declining in popularity. E.g: I loved their ads, but with the last ones they just jump the shark.
n.
Phrase used when someone has brought all the evidences to support his point of view; "I'm done with explanations"
n.
(in an auction, negotiation or other business competition) the situation in which the winning party has overrated the pursued object
[Bus.]
n.
is a test process that is performed after the software has been changed in order to verify if the changes didn't affect other software parts
n.
a patient who lost is tracheal reflexes by general anesthesia or Coma ; state whos trache has been protected by a tube that permits artificial ventilation.
Medical term
n.
unconventional monetary policy used by central banks to stimulate the national economy when conventional monetary policy has become ineffective.
exp.
it's said when someone has done things in the wrong order

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"Collins Cobuild English Dictionary for Advanced Learners 4th edition published in 2003 © HarperCollins Publishers 1987, 1995, 2001, 2003 and Collins A-Z Thesaurus 1st edition first published in 1995 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995"
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