english people don't often shake hands meaning, english p... | English Cobuild dictionary



1       adj   English means belonging or relating to England, or to its people or language. It is also often used to mean belonging or relating to Great Britain, although many people object to this.  
      The English are English people., n-plural   the N  
2       n-uncount   English is the language spoken by people who live in Great Britain and Ireland, the United States, Canada, Australia, and many other countries.  

English breakfast        ( English breakfasts    plural  ) An English breakfast is a breakfast consisting of cooked food such as bacon, eggs, sausages, and tomatoes. It also includes toast and tea or coffee.  
  (BRIT)      n-count  
Translation English Cobuild Collins Dictionary  
Collaborative Dictionary     English Cobuild
expression used when referring to something that is unlikely to happen soon (not in the time interval that one can resist holding his breath)
E.g.: "Will the economy recover any soon?" - "Don't hold your breath."
abbr. acron.
I don't give a fuck
relative to people who are attached but don't want to be too intimate with someone on whom they are dependent
I have no idea; I don't have a clue
[Informal] E.g.: Why was she upset? - Beats me!
consider that two parties don't owe anything to each other
means a liquid is not clear: this tea's got bits in it, I don't like yogurt with bits in it
assez proche de l'idée de 'il y a à boire et à manger'
term used for describing the lifestyle of married or unmarried long-term couples who don't live under the same roof
[Psych.] acronym: LAT. e.g LAT couples, LAT relationships
çà ne me dit pas grand_chose
if you can't be arsed to do something, you can't be bothered to do it (you are too lazy to do it)
colloquial, British, very common
I can't understand it, I can't believe it, I can't accept it
Slang; used as written abbreviation
to be likely to do something
banks set to miss lending targets
drinking out of a can or a bottle without touching it with the lips, by pouring the content from distance
leave without paying (in a restaurant for example)
[Slang] aka: dine and dash
in American English, 'dirt' is what British people call 'soil' ('put some dirt in a plant pot'). In British English, dirt has the connotation of being dirty ('you've got some dirt on your shoe')
a technology item that a young person no longer uses and hands over to an older person, after having purchased a last generation product
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"Collins Cobuild English Dictionary for Advanced Learners 4th edition published in 2003 © HarperCollins Publishers 1987, 1995, 2001, 2003 and Collins A-Z Thesaurus 1st edition first published in 1995 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995"