cut down on meaning, cut down on definition | English Cobuild dictionary

Collins

cut  

  ( cuts    plural & 3rd person present)   ( cutting    present participle  )
The form cut is used in the present tense and is the past tense and past participle.     
1       verb   If you cut something, you use a knife or a similar tool to divide it into pieces, or to mark it or damage it. If you cut a shape or a hole in something, you make the shape or hole by using a knife or similar tool.  
Mrs. Haines stood nearby, holding scissors to cut a ribbon...      V n  
The thieves cut a hole in the fence...      V n prep/adv  
Mr. Long was now cutting himself a piece of the pink cake...      V n n  
You can hear the saw as it cuts through the bones.      V through n  
...thinly cut cucumber sandwiches.      V-ed  
      Cut is also a noun., n-count  
The operation involves making several cuts in the cornea.     
2       verb   If you cutyourself or cut a part of your body, you accidentally injure yourself on a sharp object so that you bleed.  
Johnson cut himself shaving...      V pron-refl  
I started to cry because I cut my finger...      V n  
Blood from his cut lip trickled over his chin.      V-ed  
      Cut is also a noun., n-count  
He had sustained a cut on his left eyebrow., ...cuts and bruises.     
3       verb   If you cut something such as grass, your hair, or your fingernails, you shorten them using scissors or another tool.  
The most recent tenants hadn't even cut the grass...      V n  
You've had your hair cut, it looks great...      have n V-ed  
She had dark red hair, cut short.      V-ed  
      Cut is also a noun., n-sing  
Prices vary from salon to salon, starting at £17 for a cut and blow-dry.     
4       verb   The way that clothes are cut is the way they are designed and made.  
usu passive  
...badly cut blue suits.      V-ed  
5       verb   If you cut across or through a place, you go through it because it is the shortest route to another place.  
He decided to cut across the Heath, through Greenwich Park.      V across/through n  
    short cut  
6       verb   If you cut something, you reduce it.   (=reduce)  
The first priority is to cut costs...      V n  
The UN force is to be cut by 90%.      V n by amount  
...a deal to cut 50 billion dollars from the federal deficit.      V amount from/off n  
      Cut is also a noun., n-count   with supp, oft N in n  
The economy needs an immediate 2 per cent cut in interest rates., ...the government's plans for tax cuts.     
7       verb   If you cut a text, broadcast, or performance, you shorten it. If you cut a part of a text, broadcast, or performance, you do not publish, broadcast, or perform that part.  
The audience wants more music and less drama, so we've cut some scenes.      V n  
      Cut is also a noun., n-count  
It has been found necessary to make some cuts in the text.     
8       verb   To cut a supply of something means to stop providing it or stop it being provided.  
They used pressure tactics to force them to return, including cutting food and water supplies.      V n  
      Cut is also a noun., n-count   with supp, usu N in n  
The strike had already led to cuts in electricity and water supplies in many areas.     
9       verb   If you cut a pack of playing cards, you divide it into two.  
Place the cards face down on the table and cut them.      V n  
10       convention   When the director of a film says `cut', they want the actors and the camera crew to stop filming.  
11       verb   When a singer or band cuts a CD, they make a recording of their music.  
She eventually cut her own album.      V n  
12       verb   When a child cuts a tooth, a new tooth starts to grow through the gum.  
Many infants do not cut their first tooth until they are a year old.      V n  
13       verb   If a child cuts classes or cuts school, they do not go to classes or to school when they are supposed to.  
  (mainly AM)   (=skip)  
Cutting school more than once in three months is a sign of trouble.      V n  
14       verb   If you tell someone to cut something, you are telling them in an irritated way to stop it.  
  (mainly AM)  
INFORMAL, feelings   Why don't you just cut the crap and open the door.      V n  
15       n-count   A cut of meat is a piece or type of meat which is cut in a particular way from the animal, or from a particular part of it.  
with supp  
Use a cheap cut such as spare rib chops.     
16       n-sing   Someone's cut of the profits or winnings from something, especially ones that have been obtained dishonestly, is their share.  
INFORMAL   oft poss N   (=share)  
The lawyers, of course, take their cut of the little guy's winnings.     
17       n-count   A cut is a narrow valley which has been cut through a hill so that a road or railroad track can pass through.  
  (AM)  
in BRIT, use cutting     
18   
    cutting  
19    If you say that someone or something is a cut above other people or things of the same kind, you mean they are better than them.  
INFORMAL  
a cut above             phrase   v-link PHR n  
Joan Smith's detective stories are a cut above the rest.     
20    If you say that a situation or solution is cut and dried, you mean that it is clear and definite.  
cut and dried      phrase   v-link PHR, PHR n   (=clear-cut)  
Unfortunately, things cannot be as cut and dried as many people would like..., We are aiming for guidelines, not cut-and-dried answers.     
21    If you say that someone can't cut it, you mean that they do not have the qualities needed to do a task or cope with a situation.  
INFORMAL  
cut it      phrase   usu with broad neg  
He doesn't think English-born players can cut it abroad.     
22    If you talk about thecut and thrustof an activity, you are talking about the aspects of it that make it exciting and challenging.  
cut and thrust      phrase  
...cut-and-thrust debate between two declared adversaries.     
23    If you say that something cuts both ways, you mean that it can have two opposite effects, or can have both good and bad effects.  
to cut both ways      phrase   V inflects  
This publicity cuts both ways. It focuses on us as well as on them.     
24   
    to cut something to the bone  
    bone  
    to cut corners  
    corner  
    to cut the mustard  
    mustard  
    to cut someone to the quick  
    quick  
    to cut a long story short  
    story  
    to cut your teeth on something  
    tooth   cut across      phrasal verb   If an issue or problem cuts across the division between two or more groups of people, it affects or matters to people in all the groups.  
The problem cuts across all socioeconomic lines and affects all age groups...      V P n   cut back      phrasal verb   If you cut back something such as expenditure or cut backon it, you reduce it.  
They will be concerned to cut back expenditure on unnecessary items...      V P n (not pron)  
The Government has cut back on defence spending...      V P on n  
We have been cutting back a bit: we did have thirteen horses, but now it's nine.      V P, Also V n P  
    cutback   cut down  
1       phrasal verb   If you cut downon something or cut down something, you use or do less of it.  
He cut down on coffee and cigarettes, and ate a balanced diet...      V P on n  
Car owners were asked to cut down travel...      V P n (not pron)  
If you spend more than your income, can you try to cut down?      V P, Also V n P  
2       phrasal verb   If you cut down a tree, you cut through its trunk so that it falls to the ground.   (=chop down)  
A vandal with a chainsaw cut down a tree.      V P n (not pron), Also V n P   cut in      phrasal verb   If you cut inon someone, you interrupt them when they are speaking.   (=break in)  
Immediately, Daniel cut in on Joanne's attempts at reassurance...      V P on n  
`Not true,' the Duchess cut in.      V P with quote, Also V P   cut off  
1       phrasal verb   If you cut something off, you remove it with a knife or a similar tool.  
Mrs Kreutz cut off a generous piece of the meat...      V P n (not pron)  
He cut me off a slice...      V n P n (not pron)  
He threatened to cut my hair off.      V n P  
2       phrasal verb   To cut someone or something off means to separate them from things that they are normally connected with.   (=isolate)  
One of the goals of the campaign is to cut off the elite Republican Guard from its supplies...      V P n (not pron) from n  
The storm has cut us off.      V n P  
  cut off      adj  
Without a car we still felt very cut off.     
3       phrasal verb   To cut off a supply of something means to stop providing it or stop it being provided.  
The rebels have cut off electricity from the capital...      V P n (not pron)  
Why cut the money off?      V n P  
4       phrasal verb   If you get cut off when you are on the telephone, the line is suddenly disconnected and you can no longer speak to the other person.   (=disconnect)  
When you do get through, you've got to say your piece quickly before you get cut off...      get/be V-ed P  
I'm going to cut you off now because we've got lots of callers waiting.      V n P  
5       phrasal verb   If you cut someone off when they are speaking, you interrupt them and stop them from speaking.  
`But, sir, I'm under orders to<endash>' Clark cut him off. `Don't argue with me.'      V n P, Also V P n (not pron)  
6   
    cut-off  
    to cut off your nose to spite your face  
    spite   cut out  
1       phrasal verb   If you cut something out, you remove or separate it from what surrounds it using scissors or a knife.  
Cut out the coupon and send those cheques off today...      V P n (not pron)  
I cut it out and pinned it to my studio wall.      V n P  
2       phrasal verb   If you cut out a part of a text, you do not print, publish, or broadcast that part, because to include it would make the text too long or unacceptable.   (=cut, omit)  
I listened to the programme and found they'd cut out all the interesting stuff...      V P n (not pron)  
Her editors wanted her to cut out the poetry from her novel...      V P n (not pron) from/of n  
3       phrasal verb   To cut out something unnecessary or unwanted means to remove it completely from a situation. For example, if you cut out a particular type of food, you stop eating it, usually because it is bad for you.   (=eliminate)  
I've simply cut egg yolks out entirely...      V n P  
A guilty plea cuts out the need for a long trial.      V P n (not pron)  
4       phrasal verb   If you tell someone to cut something out, you are telling them in an irritated way to stop it.  
INFORMAL, feelings  
(=stop)  

Do yourself a favour, and cut that behaviour out...      V n P  
`Cut it out, Chip,' I said...      V it P  
He had better cut out the nonsense.      V P n (not pron)  
5       phrasal verb   If you cut someone outof an activity, you do not allow them to be involved in it. If you cut someone outof a will, you do not allow them to share in it.   (=exclude)     (Antonym: include)    Environmentalists say this would cut them out of the debate over what to do with public lands...      V n P of n  
`Cut her out of your will,' urged his nephew...      V n P of n  
He felt that he was being cut out.      be V-ed P, Also V P n (not pron)  
6       phrasal verb   If an object cuts out the light, it is between you and the light so that you are in the dark.  
The curtains were half drawn to cut out the sunlight.      V P n (not pron)  
7       phrasal verb   If an engine cuts out, it suddenly stops working.  
The helicopter crash landed when one of its two engines cut out.      V P  
8   
    cut out  
    cut-out  
    to have your work cut out  
    work   cut up  
1       phrasal verb   If you cut something up, you cut it into several pieces.  
He sits in his apartment cutting up magazines...      V P n (not pron)  
Halve the tomatoes, then cut them up coarsely.      V n P  
    cut up  
2       phrasal verb   If one driver cuts another driver up, the first driver goes too close in front of the second one, for example after passing them.  
They were crossing from lane to lane, cutting everyone up.      V n P  
Translation English - Cobuild Collins Dictionary  
Collins

cut down  

1    fell, hew, level, lop, raze  
2      (sometimes with)       on   decrease, lessen, lower, reduce  
3    blow away     (slang, chiefly U.S.)   dispatch, kill, massacre, mow down, slaughter, slay     (archaic)   take out     (slang)  
4    cut (someone) down to size      abash, humiliate, make (someone) look small, take the wind out of (someone's) sails  

English Collins Dictionary - English synonyms & Thesaurus  

See also:

down, down, down, down

Collaborative Dictionary     English Cobuild
n.
very short haircut
n.
to release sth that is tied up
exp.
relax, calm down
said to make someone temper his nerves or enthusiasm. E.g.: Chill out, I didn't take your car!
exp.
(in an organization) set up a more informal structure/workflow/environment; give up on communication protocols between departments
[Bus.]
exp.
calm down!
exp.
face a specific situation; act in a certain way
E.g.: John went out of rehab a few days ago and he is determined to not go down that road again.
exp.
metaphoric expression for getting married
exp.
to take OR bring somebody down a notch means to make them behave less arrogantly or proudly.
exp.
to take OR turn OR bring something down a notch means to decrease its intensity
n.
a body part is a part of a human body, usually one that has been cut or torn from the body in a violent incident (such as an accident, an explosion, etc)
adj.
something that is top-down comes from the top of a hierarchy and is passed down to the lower ranking members
n.
A moulding commonly used in framing oil paintings. The liner is fixed inside the frame and appears between the image and the outer frame. Generally made out of wood or some other hard material, the liner may have fabric glued down to it. Liners are to canvases what a mat/mount is to a print on paper
[Artwork framing] Polystyrene or wood liner. Fabric-covered liner. Linen liner. Gold liner.
v.
to look for or expose information about a person's past, usually bad, and to therefore bring that person down or put them in a bad light
exp.
it's said for determining someone to calm down, be patient, control his/her reactions
n.
participant-driven meeting with no predefined agenda as opposed to high-price, top-down and formal conferences

head

Reverso Community

  • Create your own vocabulary list
  • Contribute to the Collaborative Dictionary
  • Improve and share your linguistic knowledge
Advertising
"Collins Cobuild English Dictionary for Advanced Learners 4th edition published in 2003 © HarperCollins Publishers 1987, 1995, 2001, 2003 and Collins A-Z Thesaurus 1st edition first published in 1995 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995"
Advertising