count me in! meaning, count me in! definition | English Cobuild dictionary

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count

  
  ( counts    plural & 3rd person present)   ( counting    present participle)   ( counted    past tense & past participle  )
1       verb   When you count, you say all the numbers one after another up to a particular number.  
He was counting slowly under his breath...      V  
Brian counted to twenty and lifted his binoculars.      V to num  
2       verb   If you count all the things in a group, you add them up in order to find how many there are.  
I counted the money. It was more than five hundred pounds...      V n  
I counted 34 wild goats grazing...      V num  
With more than 90 percent of the votes counted, the Liberals should win nearly a third of the seats.      V-ed, Also V  
      Count up means the same as count., phrasal verb  
Couldn't we just count up our ballots and bring them to the courthouse?      V P n (not pron), Also V n P  
  counting      n-uncount   usu the N of n  
The counting of votes is proceeding smoothly.     
3       n-count   A count is the action of counting a particular set of things, or the number that you get when you have counted them.  
usu supp N  
The final count in last month's referendum showed 56.7 per cent in favour...     
4       n-count   You use count when referring to the level or amount of something that someone or something has.  
n N  
A glass or two of wine will not significantly add to the calorie count...     
    blood count  
    pollen count  
5       n-sing   You use count in expressions such as a count of three or a count of ten when you are measuring a length of time by counting slowly up to a certain number.  
N of num  
Hold your breath for a count of five, then slowly breathe out...     
6       verb   If something or someone countsfor something or counts, they are important or valuable.   (=matter)  
Surely it doesn't matter where charities get their money from: what counts is what they do with it...      V  
When I first came to college I realised that brainpower didn't count for much...      V for amount  
7       verb   If something counts or is countedas a particular thing, it is regarded as being that thing, especially in particular circumstances or under particular rules.  
No one agrees on what counts as a desert...      V as n/-ing/adj  
Two of the trucks were stopped because they had tents in them, and under the commanders' definition of humanitarian aid, that didn't count...      V  
They can count it as a success.      V n as n  
8       verb   If you count something when you are making a calculation, you include it in that calculation.   (=include)  
It's under 7 percent only because statistics don't count the people who aren't qualified to be in the work force...      V n  
The years before their arrival in prison are not counted as part of their sentence.      be V-ed as n, Also V n as n  
9       n-count   You can use count to refer to one or more points that you are considering. For example, if someone is wrong on two counts, they are wrong in two ways.  
on supp N  
`You drink Scotch,' she said. `All Republicans drink Scotch.'<emdash>`Wrong on both counts. I'm a Democrat, and I drink bourbon.'     
10       n-count   In law, a count is one of a number of charges brought against someone in court.  
usu N of n  
He was indicted by a grand jury on two counts of murder.     
11    If you keep countof a number of things, you note or keep a record of how many have occurred. If you lose countof a number of things, you cannot remember how many have occurred.  
keep count/lose count      phrase   V inflects, oft PHR of n  
The authorities say they are not able to keep count of the bodies still being found as helicopters search the area..., She'd lost count of the interviews she'd been called for.     
12    If someone is out for the count, they are unconscious or very deeply asleep.  
INFORMAL  
out for the count      phrase   v-link PHR  
13    If you say that someone should stand up and be counted, you mean that they should say publicly what they think, and not hide it or be ashamed of it.  
to stand up and be counted      phrase  
Those involved and benefiting from the scandal must be prepared to stand up and be counted.     
14   
    to count your blessings  
    blessing   count against      phrasal verb   If something counts against you, it may cause you to be rejected or punished, or cause people to have a lower opinion of you.  
He is highly regarded, but his youth might count against him.      V P n   count in      phrasal verb   If you tell someone to count you in, you mean that you want to be included in an activity.  
usu imper     (Antonym: count out)    She shrugged. `You can count me in, I guess.'      V n P   count on   , count upon  
1       phrasal verb   If you count on something or count upon it, you expect it to happen and include it in your plans.  
The government thought it could count on the support of the trades unions...      V P n/-ing  
2       phrasal verb   If you count on someone or count upon them, you rely on them to support you or help you.  
Don't count on Lillian...      V P n  
I can always count on you to cheer me up...      V P n to-inf   count out  
1       phrasal verb   If you count out a sum of money, you count the notes or coins as you put them in a pile one by one.  
Mr. Rohmbauer counted out the money and put it in an envelope.      V P n (not pron), Also V n P  
2       phrasal verb   If you tell someone to count you out, you mean that you do not want to be included in an activity.  
usu imper     (Antonym: count in)    If this is the standard to which I have to drop to gain membership, then count me out!      V n P   count towards      phrasal verb  
in AM, usually use count toward      If something counts towards or counts toward an achievement or right, it is included as one of the things that give you the right to it.  
In many courses, work from the second year onwards can count towards the final degree.      V P n   count up  
    count 2   count upon  
    count on  


blood count        ( blood counts    plural  ) Your blood count is the number of red and white cells in your blood. A blood count can also refer to a medical examination which determines the number of red and white cells in your blood.      n-count  
Her blood count was normal..., We do a blood count to ensure that all is well.     
Count     ( Counts    plural  ) A Count is a European nobleman with the same rank as an English earl.      n-count; n-title; n-voc  
Her father was a Polish Count.     
count noun        ( count nouns    plural  ) A count noun is a noun such as `bird', `chair', or `year' which has a singular and a plural form and is always used after a determiner in the singular.      n-count   (=countable noun)  
head count        ( head counts    plural  ) If you do a head count, you count the number of people present. You can also use head count to talk about the number of people that are present at an event, or that an organization employs.      n-count  
pollen count        ( pollen counts    plural  ) The pollen count is a measure of how much pollen is in the air at a particular place and time. Information about the pollen count is given to help people who are made ill by pollen.      n-count  
Avoid trips to the country while the pollen count is high.     
Translation English - Cobuild Collins Dictionary  
Collaborative Dictionary     English Cobuild
exp.
not matter; have no value or effect; be useless
exp.
polite expression offering to do something for someone
exp.
I have no idea; I don't have a clue
[Informal] E.g.: Why was she upset? - Beats me!
exp.
it occurred to me, I suddenly thought of it, I had an idea all of a sudden
E.g: I wondered all day long how to solve this problem and it suddenly hit me...I had to talk to Marry.
n.
a technology item that a young person no longer uses and hands over to an older person, after having purchased a last generation product
[Bus.];[Tech.]
exp.
expression used for catching the attention of an audience
exp.
expression used for pointing out that, if you love someone, you accept also things and people dear to the person you love
exp.
a humorous way of saying that someone doesn't like or love the speaker.
[Hum.] E.g.: You've seen the way she treated me last time we met. It's clear: she loves me not.
exp.
acronym for Let Me Know, as to ask the other party to get back to you
n.
(british slang) "a strong drink" as in "i need a stiff whisky so pour me a real snorter", or (nautical slang) "a strong wind".
Slang
exp.
go away idiot, fool ; leave me alone idiot, fool ; fuck you idiot, fool ; fuck off idiot, fool.
[Slang];[Vulg.]

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"Collins Cobuild English Dictionary for Advanced Learners 4th edition published in 2003 © HarperCollins Publishers 1987, 1995, 2001, 2003 and Collins A-Z Thesaurus 1st edition first published in 1995 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995"