bring along meaning, bring along definition | English Cobuild dictionary

Collins

bring

  
  ( brings    3rd person present)   ( bringing    present participle)   ( brought    past tense & past participle  )
1       verb   If you bring someone or something with you when you come to a place, they come with you or you have them with you.  
Remember to bring an apron or an old shirt to protect your clothes...      V n  
Come to my party and bring a girl with you...      V n  
Someone went upstairs and brought down a huge kettle...      V n with adv  
My father brought home a book for me.      V n for n with adv, Also V n n with adv, V n prep  
2       verb   If you bring something somewhere, you move it there.  
Reaching into her pocket, she brought out a cigarette...      V n with adv  
Her mother brought her hands up to her face.      V n with adv, Also V n prep  
3       verb   If you bring something that someone wants or needs, you get it for them or carry it to them.  
He went and poured a brandy for Dena and brought it to her...      V n to/for n  
The stewardess kindly brought me a blanket.      V n n, Also V n  
4       verb   To bring something or someone to a place or position means to cause them to come to the place or move into that position.  
I told you about what brought me here...      V n prep/adv  
Edna Leitch survived a gas blast which brought her home crashing down on top of her.      V n -ing  
5       verb   If you bring something new to a place or group of people, you introduce it to that place or cause those people to hear or know about it.  
...the drive to bring art to the public.      V n to n  
6       verb   To bring someone or something into a particular state or condition means to cause them to be in that state or condition.  
He brought the car to a stop in front of the square...      V n prep  
His work as a historian brought him into conflict with the political establishment...      V n prep  
They have brought down income taxes.      V n with adv  
7       verb   If something brings a particular feeling, situation, or quality, it makes people experience it or have it.  
He called on the United States to play a more effective role in bringing peace to the region...      V n to/on/from n  
Banks have brought trouble on themselves by lending rashly...      V n to/on/from n  
He brought to the job not just considerable experience but passionate enthusiasm...      V to n n  
Her three children brought her joy.      V n n  
8       verb   If a period of time brings a particular thing, it happens during that time.  
For Sandro, the new year brought disaster...      V n  
We don't know what the future will bring.      V n  
9       verb   If you bring a legal action against someone or bring them to trial, you officially accuse them of doing something illegal.  
He campaigned relentlessly to bring charges of corruption against former members of the government...      V n against n  
The ship's captain and crew may be brought to trial and even sent to prison.      be V-ed to n  
10       verb   If a television or radio programme is broughtto you by an organization, they make it, broadcast it, or pay for it to be made or broadcast.  
  (mainly BRIT)  
You're listening to Science in Action, brought to you by the BBC World Service...      be V-ed to n by n  
We'll be bringing you all the details of the day's events.      V n n  
in AM, usually use sponsor     
11       verb   When you are talking, you can say that something brings you to a particular point in order to indicate that you have now reached that point and are going to talk about a new subject.  
And that brings us to the end of this special report from Germany.      V n to n  
12       verb   If you cannot bringyourself to do something, you cannot do it because you find it too upsetting, embarrassing, or disgusting.  
with brd-neg  
It is all very tragic and I am afraid I just cannot bring myself to talk about it at the moment.      V pron-refl to-inf  
13   
    to bring something alive  
    alive  
    to bring something to bear  
    bear  
    to bring the house down  
    house  
    to bring up the rear  
    rear   bring about      phrasal verb   To bring something about means to cause it to happen.   (=cause)  
The only way they can bring about political change is by putting pressure on the country.      V P n (not pron), Also V n P   bring along      phrasal verb   If you bring someone or something along, you bring them with you when you come to a place.  
They brought along Laura Jane in a pram...      V P n (not pron)  
Dad brought a notebook along to the beach, in case he was seized by sudden inspiration.      V n P   bring back  
1       phrasal verb   Something that brings back a memory makes you think about it.  
Your article brought back sad memories for me...      V P n (not pron)  
Talking about it brought it all back.      V n P  
2       phrasal verb   When people bring back a practice or fashion that existed at an earlier time, they introduce it again.   (=revive)  
The House of Commons is to debate once again whether to bring back the death penalty.      V P n (not pron), Also V n P   bring down  
1       phrasal verb   When people or events bring down a government or ruler, they cause the government or ruler to lose power.   (=topple)  
They were threatening to bring down the government by withdrawing from the ruling coalition...      V P n (not pron)  
His challenge to Mrs Thatcher brought her down.      V n P  
2       phrasal verb   If someone or something brings down a person or aeroplane, they cause them to fall, usually by shooting them.  
Military historians may never know what brought down the jet.      V P n (not pron), Also V n P   bring forward  
1       phrasal verb   If you bring forward a meeting or event, you arrange for it to take place at an earlier date or time than had been planned.   (=put forward)     (Antonym: put back)    He had to bring forward an 11 o'clock meeting so that he could get to the funeral on time...      V P n (not pron), Also V n P  
2       phrasal verb   If you bring forward an argument or proposal, you state it so that people can consider it.   (=put forward)  
The Government will bring forward several proposals for legislation.      V P n (not pron), Also V n P   bring in  
1       phrasal verb   When a government or organization brings in a new law or system, they introduce it.   (=introduce)  
The government brought in a controversial law under which it could take any land it wanted.      V P n (not pron), Also V n P  
2       phrasal verb   Someone or something that brings in money makes it or earns it.  
I have three part-time jobs, which bring in about £14,000 a year.      V P n (not pron), Also V n P  
3       phrasal verb   If you bring in someone from outside a team or organization, you invite them to do a job or join in an activity or discussion.   (=call in)  
The firm decided to bring in a new management team.      V P n (not pron), Also V n P   bring off      phrasal verb   If you bring off something difficult, you do it successfully.   (=pull off)  
They were about to bring off an even bigger coup...      V P n (not pron)  
He thought his book would change society. But he didn't bring it off.      V n P   bring on      phrasal verb   If something brings on an illness, pain, or feeling, especially one that you often suffer from, it causes you to have it.  
Severe shock can bring on an attack of acne...      V P n (not pron)  
Bob died of a heart attack, brought on by his lifestyle.      V-ed P, Also V n P   bring out  
1       phrasal verb   When a person or company brings out a new product, especially a new book or CD, they produce it and put it on sale.  
A journalist all his life, he's now brought out a book.      V P n (not pron), Also V n P  
2       phrasal verb   Something that brings out a particular kind of behaviour or feeling in you causes you to show it, especially when it is something you do not normally show.  
He is totally dedicated and brings out the best in his pupils.      V P n (not pron), Also V n P   bring up  
1       phrasal verb   When someone brings up a child, they look after it until it is an adult. If someone has been brought up in a certain place or with certain attitudes, they grew up in that place or were taught those attitudes when they were growing up.   (=raise)  
She brought up four children...      V P n (not pron)  
His grandmother and his father brought him up...      V n P  
We'd been brought up to think that borrowing money was bad...      be V-ed P to-inf  
I was brought up a Methodist.      be V-ed P n  
2       phrasal verb   If you bring up a particular subject, you introduce it into a discussion or conversation.   (=raise)  
He brought up a subject rarely raised during the course of this campaign...      V P n (not pron)  
Why are you bringing it up now?      V n P  
3       phrasal verb   If someone brings up food or wind, food or air is forced up from their stomach through their mouth.  
It's hard for the baby to bring up wind.      V P n (not pron)  


bring-and-buy sale        ( bring-and-buy sales    plural  ) A bring-and-buy sale is an informal sale to raise money for a charity or other organization. People who come to the sale bring things to be sold and buy things that other people have brought.  
  (BRIT)      n-count  
Translation English - Cobuild Collins Dictionary  
Collins
bring     ( brings    3rd person present)   ( bringing    present participle)   ( brought    past tense & past participle  )
1       verb   If you bring someone or something with you when you come to a place, they come with you or you have them with you.  
Remember to bring an apron or an old shirt to protect your clothes...      V n  
Come to my party and bring a girl with you...      V n  
Someone went upstairs and brought down a huge kettle...      V n with adv  
My father brought home a book for me.      V n for n with adv, Also V n n with adv, V n prep  
2       verb   If you bring something somewhere, you move it there.  
Reaching into her pocket, she brought out a cigarette...      V n with adv  
Her mother brought her hands up to her face.      V n with adv, Also V n prep  
3       verb   If you bring something that someone wants or needs, you get it for them or carry it to them.  
He went and poured a brandy for Dena and brought it to her...      V n to/for n  
The stewardess kindly brought me a blanket.      V n n, Also V n  
4       verb   To bring something or someone to a place or position means to cause them to come to the place or move into that position.  
I told you about what brought me here...      V n prep/adv  
Edna Leitch survived a gas blast which brought her home crashing down on top of her.      V n -ing  
5       verb   If you bring something new to a place or group of people, you introduce it to that place or cause those people to hear or know about it.  
...the drive to bring art to the public.      V n to n  
6       verb   To bring someone or something into a particular state or condition means to cause them to be in that state or condition.  
He brought the car to a stop in front of the square...      V n prep  
His work as a historian brought him into conflict with the political establishment...      V n prep  
They have brought down income taxes.      V n with adv  
7       verb   If something brings a particular feeling, situation, or quality, it makes people experience it or have it.  
He called on the United States to play a more effective role in bringing peace to the region...      V n to/on/from n  
Banks have brought trouble on themselves by lending rashly...      V n to/on/from n  
He brought to the job not just considerable experience but passionate enthusiasm...      V to n n  
Her three children brought her joy.      V n n  
8       verb   If a period of time brings a particular thing, it happens during that time.  
For Sandro, the new year brought disaster...      V n  
We don't know what the future will bring.      V n  
9       verb   If you bring a legal action against someone or bring them to trial, you officially accuse them of doing something illegal.  
He campaigned relentlessly to bring charges of corruption against former members of the government...      V n against n  
The ship's captain and crew may be brought to trial and even sent to prison.      be V-ed to n  
10       verb   If a television or radio programme is broughtto you by an organization, they make it, broadcast it, or pay for it to be made or broadcast.  
  (mainly BRIT)  
You're listening to Science in Action, brought to you by the BBC World Service...      be V-ed to n by n  
We'll be bringing you all the details of the day's events.      V n n  
in AM, usually use sponsor     
11       verb   When you are talking, you can say that something brings you to a particular point in order to indicate that you have now reached that point and are going to talk about a new subject.  
And that brings us to the end of this special report from Germany.      V n to n  
12       verb   If you cannot bringyourself to do something, you cannot do it because you find it too upsetting, embarrassing, or disgusting.  
with brd-neg  
It is all very tragic and I am afraid I just cannot bring myself to talk about it at the moment.      V pron-refl to-inf  
13   
    to bring something alive  
    alive  
    to bring something to bear  
    bear  
    to bring the house down  
    house  
    to bring up the rear  
    rear   bring about      phrasal verb   To bring something about means to cause it to happen.   (=cause)  
The only way they can bring about political change is by putting pressure on the country.      V P n (not pron), Also V n P   bring along      phrasal verb   If you bring someone or something along, you bring them with you when you come to a place.  
They brought along Laura Jane in a pram...      V P n (not pron)  
Dad brought a notebook along to the beach, in case he was seized by sudden inspiration.      V n P   bring back  
1       phrasal verb   Something that brings back a memory makes you think about it.  
Your article brought back sad memories for me...      V P n (not pron)  
Talking about it brought it all back.      V n P  
2       phrasal verb   When people bring back a practice or fashion that existed at an earlier time, they introduce it again.   (=revive)  
The House of Commons is to debate once again whether to bring back the death penalty.      V P n (not pron), Also V n P   bring down  
1       phrasal verb   When people or events bring down a government or ruler, they cause the government or ruler to lose power.   (=topple)  
They were threatening to bring down the government by withdrawing from the ruling coalition...      V P n (not pron)  
His challenge to Mrs Thatcher brought her down.      V n P  
2       phrasal verb   If someone or something brings down a person or aeroplane, they cause them to fall, usually by shooting them.  
Military historians may never know what brought down the jet.      V P n (not pron), Also V n P   bring forward  
1       phrasal verb   If you bring forward a meeting or event, you arrange for it to take place at an earlier date or time than had been planned.   (=put forward)     (Antonym: put back)    He had to bring forward an 11 o'clock meeting so that he could get to the funeral on time...      V P n (not pron), Also V n P  
2       phrasal verb   If you bring forward an argument or proposal, you state it so that people can consider it.   (=put forward)  
The Government will bring forward several proposals for legislation.      V P n (not pron), Also V n P   bring in  
1       phrasal verb   When a government or organization brings in a new law or system, they introduce it.   (=introduce)  
The government brought in a controversial law under which it could take any land it wanted.      V P n (not pron), Also V n P  
2       phrasal verb   Someone or something that brings in money makes it or earns it.  
I have three part-time jobs, which bring in about £14,000 a year.      V P n (not pron), Also V n P  
3       phrasal verb   If you bring in someone from outside a team or organization, you invite them to do a job or join in an activity or discussion.   (=call in)  
The firm decided to bring in a new management team.      V P n (not pron), Also V n P   bring off      phrasal verb   If you bring off something difficult, you do it successfully.   (=pull off)  
They were about to bring off an even bigger coup...      V P n (not pron)  
He thought his book would change society. But he didn't bring it off.      V n P   bring on      phrasal verb   If something brings on an illness, pain, or feeling, especially one that you often suffer from, it causes you to have it.  
Severe shock can bring on an attack of acne...      V P n (not pron)  
Bob died of a heart attack, brought on by his lifestyle.      V-ed P, Also V n P   bring out  
1       phrasal verb   When a person or company brings out a new product, especially a new book or CD, they produce it and put it on sale.  
A journalist all his life, he's now brought out a book.      V P n (not pron), Also V n P  
2       phrasal verb   Something that brings out a particular kind of behaviour or feeling in you causes you to show it, especially when it is something you do not normally show.  
He is totally dedicated and brings out the best in his pupils.      V P n (not pron), Also V n P   bring up  
1       phrasal verb   When someone brings up a child, they look after it until it is an adult. If someone has been brought up in a certain place or with certain attitudes, they grew up in that place or were taught those attitudes when they were growing up.   (=raise)  
She brought up four children...      V P n (not pron)  
His grandmother and his father brought him up...      V n P  
We'd been brought up to think that borrowing money was bad...      be V-ed P to-inf  
I was brought up a Methodist.      be V-ed P n  
2       phrasal verb   If you bring up a particular subject, you introduce it into a discussion or conversation.   (=raise)  
He brought up a subject rarely raised during the course of this campaign...      V P n (not pron)  
Why are you bringing it up now?      V n P  
3       phrasal verb   If someone brings up food or wind, food or air is forced up from their stomach through their mouth.  
It's hard for the baby to bring up wind.      V P n (not pron)  


bring-and-buy sale        ( bring-and-buy sales    plural  ) A bring-and-buy sale is an informal sale to raise money for a charity or other organization. People who come to the sale bring things to be sold and buy things that other people have brought.  
  (BRIT)      n-count  

Translation English - Cobuild Collins Dictionary  

Collins

bring

  
1    accompany, bear, carry, conduct, convey, deliver, escort, fetch, gather, guide, import, lead, take, transfer, transport, usher  
2    cause, contribute to, create, effect, engender, inflict, occasion, produce, result in, wreak  
3    compel, convince, dispose, force, induce, influence, make, move, persuade, prevail on or upon, prompt, sway  
4    command, earn, fetch, gross, net, produce, return, sell for, yield  


bring about     
accomplish, achieve, bring to pass, cause, compass, create, effect, effectuate, generate, give rise to, make happen, manage, occasion, produce, realize  
bring down     
abase, cut down, drop, fell, floor, lay low, level, lower, overthrow, overturn, pull down, reduce, shoot down, undermine, upset  
bring in     
accrue, bear, be worth, fetch, gross, produce, profit, realize, return, yield  
bring off     
accomplish, achieve, bring home the bacon     (informal)   bring to pass, carry off, carry out, crack it     (informal)   cut it     (informal)   discharge, execute, perform, pull off, succeed  
bring up  
1    breed, develop, educate, form, nurture, raise, rear, support, teach, train  
2    advance, allude to, broach, introduce, mention, move, propose, put forward, submit  

English Collins Dictionary - English synonyms & Thesaurus  

Collaborative Dictionary     English Cobuild
id.
put a stop to something
exp.
used to point out that small problems or unpleasant events can in the end help things get better
adj.
inclined to bring forward small faults; made to confuse in argument
n.
underaged girl looking mature, that can thus bring somebody to jail if he is caught in a relationship with her
made with Jail and Bait
v.
to look for or expose information about a person's past, usually bad, and to therefore bring that person down or put them in a bad light
exp.
to take OR bring somebody down a notch means to make them behave less arrogantly or proudly.
exp.
to take OR turn OR bring something down a notch means to decrease its intensity

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"Collins Cobuild English Dictionary for Advanced Learners 4th edition published in 2003 © HarperCollins Publishers 1987, 1995, 2001, 2003 and Collins A-Z Thesaurus 1st edition first published in 1995 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995"