(get your) money's worth meaning, (get your) money's worth definition | English Cobuild dictionary

Collins

money

  
  ( monies    plural)   ( moneys    plural  )
1       n-uncount   Money is the coins or bank notes that you use to buy things, or the sum that you have in a bank account.  
A lot of the money that you pay at the cinema goes back to the film distributors..., Players should be allowed to earn money from advertising..., ...discounts and money saving offers.     
2       n-plural   Monies is used to refer to several separate sums of money that form part of a larger amount that is received or spent.  
FORMAL   We drew up a schedule of payments for the rest of the monies owed.     
3   
    blood money  
    pocket money  
4    If you say that someone has money to burn, you mean that they have more money than they need or that they spend their money on things that you think are unnecessary.  
have money to burn      phrase   V inflects  
He was a high-earning broker with money to burn.     
5    If you are in the money, you have a lot of money to spend.  
INFORMAL  
in the money      phrase   usu v-link PHR  
If you are one of the lucky callers chosen to play, you could be in the money.     
6    If you make money, you obtain money by earning it or by making a profit.  
make money      phrase   V inflects  
...the only bit of the firm that consistently made money.     
7    If you say that you want someone to put their money where their mouth is, you want them to spend money to improve a bad situation, instead of just talking about improving it.  
put your money where your mouth is      phrase   V inflects  
The government might be obliged to put its money where its mouth is to prove its commitment.     
8    If you say that thesmart money is on a particular person or thing, you mean that people who know a lot about it think that this person will be successful, or this thing will happen.     (JOURNALISM)  
smart money      phrase  
With England not playing, the smart money was on the Germans...     
9    If you say that money talks, you mean that if someone has a lot of money, they also have a lot of power.  
money talks      phrase  
The formula in Hollywood is simple<endash>money talks.     
10    If you say that someone is throwing money at a problem, you are critical of them for trying to improve it by spending money on it, instead of doing more thoughtful and practical things to improve it.  
throw money at      phrase   V inflects, PHR n     (disapproval)    The Australian government's answer to the problem has been to throw money at it.     
11    If you say that someone is throwing good money after bad, you are critical of them for trying to improve a bad situation by spending more money on it, instead of doing more thoughtful or practical things to improve it.  
throw good money after bad      phrase   V inflects     (disapproval)    Further heavy intervention would be throwing good money after bad.     
12    If you get your money's worth, you get something which is worth the money that it costs or the effort you have put in.  
(get your) money's worth             phrase   PHR after v  
The fans get their money's worth.     
13   
    to be rolling in money  
    rolling  
    money for old rope  
    rope  
    to give someone a run for their money  
    run  
Translation English - Cobuild Collins Dictionary  
Collins
your  
Your is the second person possessive determiner. Your can refer to one or more people.     
1       det   A speaker or writer uses your to indicate that something belongs or relates to the person or people that they are talking or writing to.  
Emma, I trust your opinion a great deal..., I left all of your messages on your desk..., If you are unable to obtain the information you require, consult your telephone directory.     
2       det   In spoken English and informal written English, your is sometimes used to indicate that something belongs to or relates to people in general.  
Pain-killers are very useful in small amounts to bring your temperature down..., I then realized how possible it was to overcome your limitations.     
3       det   In spoken English, a speaker sometimes uses your before an adjective such as `typical' or `normal' to indicate that the thing referred to is a typical example of its type.  
Stan Reilly is not really one of your typical Brighton Boys...     


in-your-face      , in-yer-face  
Someone who has an in-your-face attitude seems determined to behave in a way that is unusual or shocking, and does not care what people think of them.  
INFORMAL      adj   usu ADJ n  
It's in-your-face feminism, and it's meant to shock.     

Translation English - Cobuild Collins Dictionary  

Collaborative Dictionary     English Cobuild
exp.
= get your knickers in a twist/knot
US English, colloquial
exp.
to become very upset about something, usually something that is not important
Other expression: to get your knickers in a knot
n.
monetary and ethical value of digital assets
[Tech.]
exp.
have everything together; have all things settled/organized
E.g.: Just when I had got all my ducks in a row and I was ready to go, I received a call and had to cancel my trip.
exp.
easily gained money
n.
eMoney is electronic money exchangeable electronically via cyber digital device.
[Tech.] eMoney is electronic money exchangeable electronically via cyber digital device as cell phone
o.
eMoney is electronic money exchangeable electronically for good and services via cyber digital device.
[Tech.] eMoney is electronic money exchangeable electronically via cyber digital device as cell phone
exp.
get rid of a strong feeling towards something or someone
[Informal] If you have done something wrong, tell him and get it out of your system. After the break up, it took him some while to get her out of his system.
v.
used for saying that you think someone is spending too much money on things they do not need
exp.
get drunk or take drugs; get high
v.
be exactly right
[Fam.] Ex.: Her guess was right on the money.
exp.
sauve ton coeur
No idea what this means MJB
id.
use your common sense or resourcefulness
exp.
it's said for determining someone to calm down, be patient, control his/her reactions
n.
something easy to get
v.
launch the process, launch the project, make sure that progress is under way
idiom
exp.
get seriously involved in a relationship
n.
to support your family
exp.
calm down!
exp.
expression used for catching the attention of an audience
exp.
absolutely not; not in this lifetime
Slang expression used mostly in 19th century
n.
buy one, get one free
It's a common form of sales promotion. This marketing technique is universally known in the marketing industry by the acronym BOGOF.
exp.
expression used when referring to something that is unlikely to happen soon (not in the time interval that one can resist holding his breath)
E.g.: "Will the economy recover any soon?" - "Don't hold your breath."
exp.
your best clothes that you wear on special occasions
exp.
expression used to encourage someone to share with you what's on his mind

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"Collins Cobuild English Dictionary for Advanced Learners 4th edition published in 2003 © HarperCollins Publishers 1987, 1995, 2001, 2003 and Collins A-Z Thesaurus 1st edition first published in 1995 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995"
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